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Fears that millions of new homes will be toppled in the major government restructuring


Experts fear that mass developments could be accelerated without extensive local consultation in the wake of the government's radical revision of the current planning system.

Boris Johnson plans to revolutionize the process through a "one-off" reform that divides the country into three types of land: areas intended for "growth", areas for "renewal" and others for "protection" & # 39 ;.

In "growth areas", new homes, hospitals, schools, shops and offices are automatically approved for development.

However, experts fear that the reforms could override the public consultation or deter developers as a whole if they try to understand the new, complex rules.

Housing secretary Robert Jenrick said the current "complex and slow" system used by developers and homeowners to get planning permission has been "an obstacle to building affordable homes where families can raise children and build their lives" .

Housing secretary Robert Jenrick said the current "complex and slow" planning system used by developers and homeowners to get planning permission has been an obstacle to building affordable homes where families want to raise children and build their lives.

James Jamieson, chairman of the Local Government Association, told The Mirror: "It is important that all reforms provide the right protection so that residents have the power to shape the area they live in."

More than a million properties have not yet been built, even though they have been granted building permits in the past ten years.

Around 90 percent of the properties are approved, he added, suggesting that planning applications don't hold back developers.

Boris Johnson plans to process the process as part of a

Boris Johnson plans to revolutionize the process through a "one-off" reform that divides the country into three types of land: areas intended for "growth", areas for "renewal" and others for "protection" & # 39 ;

Mark Crane of the District Council Network said: "We cannot compromise on the quality of new homes and locations and override the public consultation that we fear will result from the reforms."

Polly Neate, managing director of Shelter, said: "Home builders risk insecurity if they try to understand the new system and what it means for their plans – just as the construction industry faces an enormous economic downturn."

The reforms are the backbone of the Prime Minister's promise to "build, build, build" to restart the economy as the country tries to get out of the block.

Jenrick wrote in the Sunday Telegraph ahead of a consultation due to start next week and unveiled plans for a "digital transformation" that would allow residents to check plans for their area using online maps instead of "clues to lampposts" display.

Experts, the reforms could override the public consultation or deter developers all together when trying to understand the new, complex rules (file image)

Experts, the reforms could override the public consultation or deter developers all together when trying to understand the new, complex rules (file image)

At the moment it can take five years for a standard housing estate to be given the green light "before a spade is even in the ground," he said.

Mr. Jenrick believes that this process can be shortened to two years.

He claimed that the new reforms would also create thousands of new jobs in construction and architecture. Mr. Jenrick also claimed that bureaucracy delayed the construction of new hospitals and schools and road improvements.

As part of the new system, residents are asked to give their opinion on which land to grow, renew or protect before the councils make their final decision.

As part of the new system, residents are asked to give their opinion on which land to grow, renew or protect before the councils make their final decision

As part of the new system, residents are asked to give their opinion on which land to grow, renew or protect before the councils make their final decision

Areas that are intended for renewal have a basic approval approach. This means that builds can still be done quickly after reviewing.

Most of these areas will be urban areas and fallow areas.

Protected land includes the “Green Belt, areas of exceptional natural beauty and rich heritage,” wrote Jenrick.

He admitted that people would be concerned after "streets with identikit," Anywheresville "houses have become the norm", but stressed that the new plan "takes quality and design into account more than ever and deviates from the idea of Design codes and patterns inspire books & # 39 ;.

A number of standards will ensure that new homes are built in the same style as others in the region.

As part of a strategy paper called "Planning for the Future," which is due to be released next week, key workers should have priority access to housing through their local councils, the Sunday Times reports.

The developers' funds are also being misused to enable the locals to get discounts on property prices – to bring more people to the property managers.

Those who want to build their own houses from scratch will be helped by the new reforms to find local land.

A Conservative Party source told the paper: “Once a local plan is approved and zoning is complete, it is much more difficult to block new developments.

"But the downside is that the house in question has to conform to local designs and have facilities for schools and doctors that create these attractive places to live and don't burden existing public services."

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