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"Fauci flattens the curve": Dr. Anthony Fauci opens the 2020 MLB season with a first pitch


"Fauci is finally making the curve flatter": Dr. Anthony Fauci opens the 2020 MLB season with a wild ceremonial first pitch – but the well-known Nationals fan practiced social distancing, wore a mask, and even bumped elbows with Washington players

  • Dr. Anthony Fauci, the nation's leading infectious disease expert, opened the 2020 pandemic-delayed MLB season by throwing out ceremonial first place before the Nationals hosted the visiting Yankees
  • Fauci's bad luck stayed behind the plate and was a little outside. It was clocked at 17 mph on the radar gun per ESPN
  • In accordance with the health guidelines, Fauci then hit the elbows with Nationals' pitcher Sean Doolittle
  • American university professor Matt Winkler was spotted outside the baseball stadium in a Fauci replica jersey
  • According to Johns Hopkins University, there were more than 3.9 million confirmed cases of COVID-19, the disease caused by the virus, and more than 142,000 deaths in the United States

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The Major League Baseball received from Dr. Anthony Fauci, the country's best infectious disease expert, a clean health certificate. He kicked out first place at the season opener on Thursday evening between defending champion Washington Nationals and visiting New York Yankees.

Fauci's bad luck fell behind the plate and was a few feet outside the strike zone. According to the ESPN, the pitch was measured with the radar gun at only 27 km / h.

"Fauci has finally flattened the curve," joked Will Brinson of CBS Sports on Twitter.

In accordance with the health guidelines, Fauci then hit the elbows with Nationals' pitcher Sean Doolittle

At least one fan, American University professor Matt Winkler, wore a & # 39; Fauci & # 39; s replica jersey before the game outside the park Nationals.

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Dr. Anthony Fauci opened the 2020 MLB season on Thursday evening by throwing a wild ceremonial first place that ricocheted off the plate and a few feet outside the strike zone.

CBS Sports' Will Brinson was one of many social media users who joked about Fauci's pitch on Thursday

CBS Sports' Will Brinson was one of many social media users who joked about Fauci's pitch on Thursday

Dr. Anthony Fauci's bad luck fell behind the plate and was a few feet outside the strike zone

Dr. Anthony Fauci's bad luck fell behind the plate and was a few feet outside the strike zone

Thursday's game was an obvious departure from a typical opening day, traditionally held in late March or early April. It is often the president who throws the ceremonial first pitch on a Nationals or Baltimore Orioles game, but this tradition has not continued under Donald Trump.

Instead, in the midst of the coronavirus outbreak that reduced the MLB schedule to 60 games, Fauci was given the honor of starting the 2020 pandemic delayed season.

Fauci was a New York native who played basketball at the city's Regis High School before attending Holy Cross in 1958. He is a former minor league baseball player and a die-hard Nationals fan who has lived in the Washington area for many years.

Dr. Anthony Fauci watches from the stands after kicking out the ceremonial first place

Dr. Anthony Fauci watches from the stands after kicking out the ceremonial first place

With & # 39; BLM & # 39; on the hill Dr. Anthony Fauci's ceremonial first pitch on Thursday out of the strike zone

With & # 39; BLM & # 39; on the hill Dr. Anthony Fauci's ceremonial first pitch on Thursday out of the strike zone

American University professor Matt Winkler wears a Washington Nationals jersey referring to the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Anthony Fauci, on the terrace of a restaurant outside of National Park

American University professor Matt Winkler wears a Washington Nationals jersey referring to the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Anthony Fauci, on the terrace of a restaurant outside of National Park

Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, has become the government's most visible face in the fight against the virus, and surveys show that he is also the most trustworthy authority. This is in sharp contrast to Trump, who receives poor grades from the public after giving up much of the U.S. response to the nation's governors, leading to an inconsistent jumble of restrictions and a resurgence of the disease in many states.

Fauci and two other senior public health officials will testify next week to a House subcommittee that is examining the federal response to a coronavirus pandemic that is still inflicting an unrelenting toll on Americans.

The July 31 hearing will focus on the "urgent need for a comprehensive national plan" to fight the virus, Committee officials said in a statement announcing the meeting.

According to Johns Hopkins University, there were more than 3.9 million confirmed cases of COVID-19, the disease caused by the virus, and more than 142,000 deaths in the United States.

Fauci speaks to Sean Doolittle after kicking out ceremonial first place in Washington on Thursday

Fauci speaks to Sean Doolittle after kicking out ceremonial first place in Washington on Thursday

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