ENTERTAINMENT

Fairytale of New York & # 39; alternative version & # 39; defended by BBC Radio 1


BBC Radio 1 insiders have defended the decision to play the "alternate version" of Fairytale of New York to avoid offending younger viewers who are "particularly sensitive" to derogatory terms of gender and sexuality.

The broadcaster decided to use the words & # 39; f *** ot & # 39; and & # 39; sl * t & # 39; from the track sung in 1987 by Pogues frontman Shane MacGowan and Kirsty MacColl.

The lyrics appear in the 2019 version of Radio 1, but an older version is played this year with MacColl singing "haggard" rather than "f *** ot". The word & # 39; sl * t & # 39; is muted.

BBC Radio 1 decided to use the words & # 39; f **** t & # 39; and & # 39; sl * t & # 39; from the track sung in 1987 by Pogues frontman Shane MacGowan and Kirsty MacColl. Image: Kirsty MacColl and Shane MacGowan who played the track

Insiders told MailOnline the move was a response to concerns that the words "sl * t" and "f *** ot" on BBC Radio 1 were not meeting listeners' expectations.

Another source told The Sun, “The feeling is that Radio 1 listeners are younger and may not be that familiar with this song. It was therefore decided to edit the texts. This Christmas only the new version will be broadcast on Radio 1. & # 39;

BBC Radio 2 has chosen to broadcast the original version of the title, while Radio 6 presenters have a choice of either.

Radio 1's decision sparked a backlash today.

Spiked employee Fraser Myers, 29, told MailOnline, "When the BBC talks about" young people, "it is referring to a tiny minority of middle-class vocalists.

“Last time I checked, normal young people are still into sex, drugs, and drill music and aren't offended by the PC-less language.

Defending the use of language in the song, Shane Macgowan said in 2017, “The word was used by the character because it suited the way she would speak and her character.

“She's not supposed to be a nice or even healthy person. She is a woman of a certain generation at a certain time in history and she is lucky and desperate. & # 39;

The broadcaster's unedited use of Fairytale of New York has been a source of controversy in recent years. A performance of the title in last year's Gavin and Stacey Christmas special received 866 complaints.

The one-off episode was seen by 11.6 million viewers when it aired, but some were upset when the arc & # 39; f **** t & # 39; was not omitted in Nessa and Bryn's rendering.

However, the BBC defended the expletive's use at the time, claiming when The Pogues wrote the song in 1987 the word was not associated with homosexuality.

The BBC decided to use the words & # 39; f **** t & # 39; and & # 39; sl * t & # 39; from the title published in 1987 by The Pogues and Kirsty MacColl, to avoid getting offended during the holiday season

The BBC decided to use the words & # 39; f **** t & # 39; and & # 39; sl * t & # 39; from the title published in 1987 by The Pogues and Kirsty MacColl, to avoid getting offended during the holiday season

In the updated version, the word & # 39; f **** t & # 39; in & # 39; haggard & # 39; changed and & # 39; sl * t & # 39; is muted

In the updated version, the word & # 39; f **** t & # 39; in & # 39; haggard & # 39; changed and & # 39; sl * t & # 39; is muted

A spokesman said: “The lineage of their relationship is reflected in the increasingly abusive and offensive terms they use to address one another. Insults intended to reflect the language such characters may have used during that time.

& # 39; The origin of the word includes a definition describing it as a despicable and antiquated word for laziness, and the song's author cited this conclusion behind his inclusion of that line.

& # 39; While the word & # 39; f **** t & # 39; is now widely classified as offensive, the song never suggests or implies that this is or was an appropriate way to address another person, nor does it link it to homosexuality. & # 39;

In December last year, 57-year-old DJ Alex Dyke scolded BBC listeners that he was "no longer comfortable" when he had the "nasty" Pogues hit on his playlist.

Before hosting a show on BBC Radio Solent, Dyke tweeted that he wanted to ban the song – which was consistently voted the nation's most popular Christmas number – and share some of the lyrics that offended him.

A BBC spokesperson commented: "This was Alex's decision. There is no prohibition. We have a strict music policy that we are likely to adhere to. & # 39;

The BBC used an old recording of British singer MacColl to edit the line "You're cheap lousy" to "You're cheap and you're gaunt".

The BBC used an old recording of British singer MacColl to edit the line "You're cheap lousy" to "You're cheap and you're lean".

Fairytale of New York has sold nearly 1.5 million copies and is officially the UK's most played Christmas carol.

In 2007, BBC Radio 1 cut the controversial words out of the song.

But the broadcaster quickly traced the decision back after a reaction from the audience.

The BBC said today, "We know the song is considered a Christmas classic and we will continue to play it this year. Our radio stations will choose the version of the song that is most relevant to their audience."

Radio 2 said, & # 39; We checked this topic very carefully and decided to play the original song. As always, we will continue to monitor our listeners' views on the lyrics of this very popular Christmas carol. & # 39;

And 6 Music added, & # 39; The New York fairy tale was changed in a moment of time and times. Since we are a radio station for every music lover, we have provided an edited version as well as the original so that the moderators can choose. & # 39;