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Facebook, Messenger and Instagram crash


Facebook, Messenger, and Instagram are crashing and thousands of users are unable to log into social media websites

  • Facebook, Messenger, and Instagram have stopped working for some users
  • DownDetector logged thousands of complaints shortly after 9:30 a.m. UK time
  • Thousands of people across the UK were unable to send messages

Facebook, Messenger, and Instagram all stopped working for some users this morning.

Facebook's social media apps went down around 9:30 a.m. GMT, according to the Downdetector website, which monitors online outages.

Users can't send messages and they get an error stating that the app is waiting for the network.

More than half (52 percent) of reported problems with Messenger are related to sending and receiving messages, while the largest reported problem on the main Facebook site is total blackout, which accounts for 41 percent of the problems.

It is currently unknown what is causing the problem and how long it will last.

Downdetector shows thousands of people reported problems with Facebook Messenger. More than half (52 percent) of the reported problems with Messenger are related to sending and receiving messages

This heat map shows the concentration of user complaints posted online related to Facebook Messenger issues. Problems are concentrated in Europe, with some problems also coming from East Asia and Australia

This heat map shows the concentration of user complaints posted online related to Facebook Messenger issues. Problems are concentrated in Europe, with some problems also coming from East Asia and Australia

"We are aware that some people have problems sending messages via Messenger, Instagram and Workplace Chat," a Facebook spokesman told MailOnline.

"We are working to get things back to normal as soon as possible."

Facebook's private messaging app, Messenger, appears to be facing its major issues. Most of the reports come from the UK and Europe.

Instagram and Facebook have hundreds of complaints, but Messenger suffers from thousands, according to Downdetector.

Downdetector also saw a surge in users reporting issues with Facebook's Messenger app

The Instagram map (pictured) shows a Europe-centric issue, but there are some complaints worldwide (light yellow) including the US in Brazil, India and Russia. Australia and Japan appear to be facing significant problems similar to those of Europe

The Instagram map (pictured) shows a Europe-centric issue, but there are some complaints worldwide (light yellow) including the US in Brazil, India and Russia. Australia and Japan appear to be facing significant problems similar to those of Europe

Instagram has also seen a significant increase in the number of people reporting issues, but it has been in the hundreds, rather than thousands

The biggest reported problem on the Facebook website is total blackout, which accounts for 41 percent of the problems. Formed the site of most of the complaints related to Facebook

The biggest reported problem on the Facebook website is total blackout, which accounts for 41 percent of the problems. Formed the site of most of the complaints related to Facebook

Frustrated users have visited Twitter, the last remnant of mainstream social media media that Mark Zuckerberg doesn't own, to share their anger.

One user wrote: & # 39; Either the Facebook messenger is down on my phone or my WiFi is extremely bad this morning. Let me write back to my friends! & # 39;

Others quipped that because of the wide reach of Facebook's own apps, they were cut off and had nothing to talk to.

WhatsApp, which is also owned by Facebook, does not appear to be affected.

A Twitter user named "I'mChicken" said, "I'm here on Twitter because Facebook and Messenger are their own #fcebookmessengerdown."

Another historian named Mike Covell said, "#FacebookDown If you need me, send a carrier pigeon."

Sophie Hughes used Twitter to joke that the apps might force her to call people offline. "How am I going to deal with this?" She adds.

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