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Facebook bans Trump's account after the president caused the MAGA mob to storm the U.S. Capitol


President Trump's Facebook and Instagram accounts will remain on hold until at least January 20 amid fears it will lead to more violence after his supporters stormed the U.S. Capitol in Washington DC on Wednesday.

In an exceptional contribution, Facebook boss Mark Zuckerberg accused Trump of using the platform to "incite violent uprisings against a democratically elected government".

The decision was announced in a blog post by Zuckerberg on Thursday and is likely to put pressure on Twitter, Trump's most popular social media platform, to do the same after being banned for 12 hours on Wednesday night.

Zuckerberg said the president used his Facebook page to "condone rather than condemn the actions of his supporters in the Capitol," and that it would be too risky for him to post freely in the last 13 days of his term could.

"The shocking events of the past 24 hours clearly show that President Donald Trump intends to use his remaining term in office to undermine the peaceful and lawful transfer of power to his elected successor, Joe Biden," wrote Zuckerberg.

DailyMail.com has asked the White House for a comment.

Twitter suspended Trump's account for 12 hours on Wednesday and deleted his tweets for the first time after praising the mob that stormed Congress and saying they "loved" her.

His Twitter account should go back online on Thursday.

Trump was allegedly angry about being blocked by Twitter and complained to aides that he couldn't send messages to his followers, sources told the Daily Beast.

He allegedly claimed his ban was an example of big tech firms trying to silence him.

In September 2019, Trump posted a photo shaking hands with Zuckerberg during a meeting in the Oval Office. "Nice meeting with Mark Zuckerberg from Facebook today in the Oval Office," wrote the then president

In an exceptional post, Zuckerberg accused Trump of using Facebook to

In an exceptional post, Zuckerberg accused Trump of using Facebook to "instigate violent uprisings against a democratically elected government."

Four people died on Wednesday after a crowd of Trump supporters stormed the barricades and breached the U.S. Capitol in Washington, DC when a joint congressional session was convened to confirm President-elect Joe Biden's victory

Four people died on Wednesday after a crowd of Trump supporters stormed the barricades and breached the U.S. Capitol in Washington, DC when a joint congressional session was convened to confirm President-elect Joe Biden's victory

Trump was told by Twitter that the only way to continue using his personal Twitter account was to delete three controversial posts about the violence on Capitol Hill.

The president has reportedly followed suit and will be using his account again, according to The Wall Street Journal.

Snapchat blocked Trump on Wednesday morning before shooting the video. The platform said their account suspension was perpetual.

DailyMail.com has reached out to Twitter for a comment on whether it intends to follow Facebook's lead.

It was also revealed Thursday that YouTube, owned by Google, has banned all videos that "contain content that makes false claims that widespread fraud, error or interference altered the outcome of past US presidential elections."

In the 13 days of his presidency, Trump will not be able to communicate with his 35.2 million+ followers on Facebook.

The president is also being blocked from his 24.6 million followers on Instagram, a property of Facebook.

"His decision to use his platform to condone rather than condemn the actions of his supporters in the Capitol has rightly worried people in the US and around the world," the Zuckerberg statement read.

“We removed these statements yesterday because we assessed that their effect – and probably their intent – is to provoke further violence.

“Now that the election results have been confirmed by Congress, it must be a priority for the whole country to ensure that the remaining 13 days and the days after the inauguration are peaceful and in accordance with established democratic norms.

“Over the past few years, we've allowed President Trump to use our platform according to our own rules, sometimes removing content or flagging his posts if it violates our guidelines.

In the 13 days of his presidency, Trump will not be able to communicate with his 35.2 million+ followers on Facebook

In the 13 days of his presidency, Trump will not be able to communicate with his 35.2 million+ followers on Facebook

“We did this because we believe the public has a right to the widest possible access to political and even controversial language.

"But the current context is radically different now and includes using our platform to instigate violent uprisings against a democratically elected government."

Zuckerberg concluded, “We believe the risk that the president will continue to use our ministry during this time is just too great.

"That is why we are extending the block that we have placed on his Facebook and Instagram accounts indefinitely and for at least the next two weeks until the peaceful change of power is complete."

Zuckerberg's relationship with Trump has seen its ups and downs.

The Facebook boss has been heavily criticized both by his own employees and by large parts of the public for not cracking down on the president's most controversial contributions.

Facebook boss Mark Zuckerberg

President Trump

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg (left) announced Thursday that President Trump's (right) accounts on Facebook and Instagram will be banned until at least January 20

In September 2019, Trump posted a photo shaking hands with Zuckerberg during a meeting in the Oval Office.

"Nice meeting with Mark Zuckerberg from Facebook today in the Oval Office," wrote the then president.

Zuckerberg and Trump had dinner at the White House in the fall of 2019. Billionaire Peter Thiel joined the two men.

Thiel, one of Trump's earliest supporters, was also one of Facebook's earliest investors. He remains a member of the company's Board of Directors.

Zuckerberg met with Trump and other Republican lawmakers, as well as prominent Conservative commentators, in recent years to address concerns about censorship.

Facebook critics have accused Zuckerberg of doing Trump a favor to stave off potential regulatory action by the federal government regarding the company's business practices.

Facebook and other tech giants like Google, Amazon, Microsoft and Apple have been accused of too much power by lawmakers on both sides of the aisle as well as by consumer advocates.

Last month, the Trump administration and 48 states and districts sued Facebook, accusing it of abusing its market power on social networks to destroy smaller competitors.

The FTC fined Facebook $ 5 billion in 2019 for data breaches and introduced new oversight and restrictions on its business.

The fine was the highest the agency has ever imposed on a tech company, although it had no visible impact on Facebook's business.

Facebook is the world's largest social network, with 2.7 billion users and a company valued at nearly $ 800 billion, whose CEO Zuckerberg is the fifth richest individual in the world and the most public face of Big Tech Swagger.

The measures taken by Zuckerberg's company and other social media platforms to limit Trump for the last 13 days of his presidency are likely to rekindle suspicions of an anti-conservative tendency among the big technology companies.

Trump's social media posts and videos following the violence in the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday were criticized for their seemingly mixed messaging when the president refused to condemn the mob that violated the congressional campus.

One of the deleted tweets reads: “These are the things and events that happen when a holy landslide election victory is so unceremoniously and viciously deprived of great patriots who have been treated badly and unfairly for so long. Go home with love and in peace. Remember that day forever! & # 39;

Donald Trump finally addressed his supporters in a video on Wednesday in which he continued to claim the election was stolen.

Donald Trump finally addressed his supporters in a video on Wednesday in which he continued to claim the election was stolen.

In the deleted video, he poured more fuel on the fire, claimed the election was "stolen" and told the rioters that he "loved" it.

Facebook also banned its employees from discussing the riots on Capitol Hill on internal message boards demanding that tech company employees be permanently banned from the site.

In his video, Trump said to the seditious supporters: “I know your pain. I know that you are hurt We had a choice that was stolen from us.

“It was a landslide election and everyone knows it, especially the other side, but you have to go home now. We must have peace. We must have law and order. We must respect our great people in law and order. We don't want anyone to get hurt. & # 39;

Trump said it was "a very difficult time", highlighting his personal loss.

“There has never been a time like this when something like this happened, when they could take it away from all of us, me, you, our country.

“This was a fraudulent choice, but we cannot play into the hands of these people. We must have peace. So go home

& # 39; We love you. You are something special. You saw what happened. You see how others are treated who are so bad and so angry. I know how you feel. But go home and go home in peace. & # 39;

In a shocking tweet on Wednesday, Donald Trump sent mixed messages about Washington anarchy, saying, "Remember that day forever!" and call the rioters "great patriots"

In a shocking tweet on Wednesday, Donald Trump sent mixed messages about Washington anarchy, saying, "Remember that day forever!" and call the rioters "great patriots"

In the third tweet deleted from Twitter, Trump attacked Mike Pence for lack of courage.

In the third tweet deleted from Twitter, Trump attacked Mike Pence for lack of courage.

The third deleted tweet, posted a few hours before the others, attacked Mike Pence for failing to stop certifying Joe Biden's victory.

“Mike Pence did not have the courage to do what should have been done to protect our country and our Constitution, and gave states the opportunity to confirm a corrected set of facts, not the fraudulent or inaccurate ones they have had to certify beforehand. & # 39; he tweeted.

"USA demands the truth!"

The video and tweets were removed on Wednesday evening.

Twitter showed a picture that said, "This tweet is no longer available" and linked back to its page explaining why tweets are being blocked or warned.

Police used tear gas on protesters who refused to move from barriers outside the White House

Police used tear gas on protesters who refused to move from barriers outside the White House

Twitter said it removed the tweets for violating the Civic Integrity Policy.

"Due to the unprecedented and ongoing violent situation in Washington, DC, we had to remove three @ realDonaldTrump tweets that were released today for repeated and serious violations of our Civic Integrity Policy," the social media company said.

& # 39; This means that @realDonaldTrump's account will be suspended for 12 hours after removing these Tweets. If the tweets are not removed, the account will remain suspended. & # 39;

A Facebook spokesperson said, "We have assessed two policy violations against President Trump's page that will result in a 24-hour function block, which means he will no longer be able to post on the platform during that time."

Adam Mosseri, head of Instagram, said: "We are also blocking President Trump's Instagram account for 24 hours."

Andy Stone, another Facebook spokesman, previously told CNN Business: "The violent protests at today's Capitol are a shame."

He added: “We prohibit incitement and encourage violence on our platform. We actively review and remove content that violates these rules. & # 39;

Farshad Shadloo, YouTube spokesperson, said in an email to Insider: & # 39; We removed a video posted on Donald Trump's channel this afternoon that violates our guidelines regarding content that allegedly alleged widespread fraud or error contain.

"We allow copies of this video if it is uploaded with additional context and sufficient educational, documentary, scientific or artistic value (EDSA)."

And Rachel Racusen told The Information that Trump's Snapchat account was also banned.

"We can confirm that earlier today we blocked President Trump's Snapchat account," she said in a statement.

Paramedics and protesters work together to move a wounded man onto a barrier near the Capitol

Paramedics and protesters work together to move a wounded man onto a barrier near the Capitol

The mostly maskless crowd flooded the Capitol halls with little resistance from the Capitol Police

The mostly maskless crowd flooded the Capitol halls with little resistance from the Capitol Police

A protester walks through Congress with Nancy Pelosi's lectern after storming the Capitol

A protester walks through Congress with Nancy Pelosi's lectern after storming the Capitol

The DC National Guard was dispatched to the streets to enforce a 6 p.m. curfew

The DC National Guard was dispatched to the streets to enforce a 6 p.m. curfew

He won't be able to share any new content until Snap decides to lift the restriction, she said, noting that his account was suspended on Wednesday before he posted the video about the "stolen" elections.

Twitter, Facebook, and YouTube have flagged content previously posted by the president with warnings from last year, specifically his allegations about election fraud and COVID-19.

During the 2020 presidential election, the platforms tagged dozen of Trump's tweets making false or misleading claims of election fraud.

However, this appears to be the first time Twitter has flagged a tweet as "risk of violence".

Amid the violence, Facebook employees were surprised that the company had frozen at least three chat threads on the internal workplace messaging network, according to BuzzFeed News.

Some of the staff at the Menlo Park, California-based social network expressed anger at Trump over the violence and discussed the next steps the company needs to take, including removing his account.

"Donald Trump directly triggered a terrorist attack on Capitol Hill," wrote a Facebook employee in a chat that was later frozen.

“We have to close his account now. This is not a moment for half measures. "

No explanation was given to staff as to why the chat threads were frozen. DailyMail.com has asked Facebook for a comment.

Facebook's internal dissatisfaction reflects greater outrage over the tech giant, as well as its competitors, who are being asked to ban Trump entirely.

During the Trump presidency, Facebook employees complained about what they felt was CEO Mark Zuckerberg's hands-off approach.

In June, staff were outraged by Zuckerberg's refusal to remove a post that the president spoke of "looting and shooting" during the protests that broke out in Minneapolis following the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis.

On May 29, as riots hit Minneapolis and riots spread to other parts of the country, the president used social media to write, “I can't stand back and watch this happen in a large American city, Minneapolis. A complete lack of guidance.

Either the very weak radical left mayor Jacob Frey brings his act together and brings the city under control, or I will send in the National Guard and do the job properly.

"These RACKS dishonor the memory of George Floyd and I will not let that happen."

I've just spoken to Governor Tim Walz and told him the military is with him all the way.

"Any difficulty and we'll take control, but when the looting begins, the shooting begins."

Twitter has banned the president from its platform for 12 hours

Twitter has banned the president from its platform for 12 hours

Facebook has banned Trump for 24 hours

Instagram, owned by Facebook, followed suit

Facebook and Instagram have banned Trump from their platforms for 24 hours

& # 39; Thank you! & # 39;

Trump's tweet was tagged with a disclaimer by Twitter, flagging the president for violating company rules to glorify violence.

The phrase "when the looting begins, the shooting begins" was made famous by Walter Headley, Miami's chief of police, who was known as a racist and used it to describe attempts to quell race riots in the late 1960s.

Trump told reporters that he was unaware of the racially charged history of the sentence.

Trying to clear up, the president later tweeted, "Looting leads to shootings, and that's why a man was shot in Minneapolis Wednesday night – or see what just happened to 7 people in Louisville."

"I don't want this to happen, and that's what the phrase that came out last night means …"

“It was spoken as a fact, not a statement.

"It's very simple, nobody should have a problem with it except the haters and those who want to cause problems on social media."

"Honor the memory of George Floyd!"

Unlike Facebook, Twitter has also released a disclaimer for another tweet from Trump – this one about his claim that email voting initiatives are prone to election fraud.

In response, Trump signed an executive order threatening to prevent the removal of the legal protections that prevent social media companies from being sued over content posted by third parties.

Several Facebook employees resigned in protest of the decision not to remove the "Loot and Shoot" post, and internal emails showed that most voted in a poll that the company no longer allows free speech on its platform .

In a virtual town hall with employees, Zuckerberg defended the decision not to dismiss the post.

He said he didn't think the post would be "read as a dog whistle for self-help supporters to take justice into their own hands".

The CEO said it was decided to leave the post because "people need to know if the government plans to use force".

During the bipartisan Trump era, Facebook has come under fire from both liberals, who accuse the social network of helping the president in the 2016 election, and conservatives.

Liberals argue that Facebook allows disinformation to spread, which creates unrest and violence, while conservatives have accused the platform of censoring their views.

On Wednesday morning, Snapchat banned the president from its website indefinitely

On Wednesday morning, Snapchat banned the president from its website indefinitely

A woman died on Wednesday when a crowd of angry Trump supporters broke through the Capitol and entered the chambers of the House and Senate.

The Senate was evacuated at 2:30 p.m.

There are more than 2,000 Capitol Police officers with special jurisdiction on the Capitol Grounds. But they were overrun when protesters pounded through a window and entered the building.

The Capitol Police were seen by Trump supporters on the first floor of the Capitol building absorbing violent lunges.

Police from neighboring Montgomery County, Maryland, were also brought near the Capitol, CNN reported.

Washington DC Mayor Muriel Bowser had mobilized National Guard troops, dubbed the "Stop the Steal Event," ahead of the pro-Trump rally, despite the fact that this coincided with the legislative efforts of Congress to count the votes University.

The entire DC National Guard should be activated within hours, the Washington Post reported, after Bowser on duty asked to be sent to the Capitol.

Bowser also imposed a 6 p.m. curfew on Washington.

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