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Extinction Rebellion activists hijack the cenotaph on Memorial Day in protest against climate change


Extinction Rebellion activists hijacked the cenotaph on Remembrance Day in a "really shameful" stunt of climate change.

Eco-warriors trampled over wreaths and unveiled a banner at 8am at the memorial in Whitehall in central London that read "Honor your sacrifice, climate change means war".

Former soldier Donald Bell led the protest when he was silent for two minutes before hanging his own wreath with the words "Climate change means war, act now".

City police, who later shot down and recorded the message, were seen parked near the cenotaph but did nothing to stop the demonstrators.

This was in stark contrast to Sunday, when officials knocked Scottish Guard veteran bagpiper Ben Buckland to the ground as he marched past the police barricade guarding the memorial.

It comes as homes across the UK fell silent on Armistice Day in memory of the Nation's War Day when the coronavirus pandemic curtailed public commemorations.

The public were asked not to gather at the cenotaph on Memorial Day to stop the spread of Covid-19, but the brazen XR protesters ignored the request.

The move has been deemed "cowardly" and "disrespected" by veterans and social media users who adhered to government restrictions.

Extinction Rebellion activists hijacked the cenotaph on Remembrance Day in a "really shameful" stunt of climate change

Eco-warriors unveiled a banner reading "Honor your sacrifice, climate change means war" at the Whitehall memorial in central London at 8am

Eco warriors unveiled a banner reading "Honor your sacrifice, climate change means war" at the Whitehall memorial in central London at 8am

The 64-year-old said he wanted to highlight how climate change could cause more wars.

The 64-year-old said he wanted to highlight how climate change could cause more wars.

Mr Bell (right) said: “I took action today because I knew I would be criticized. I knew I would be accused of being disrespectful and hated by many for speaking up that way. & # 39;

Mr Bell (right) said, “I took action today because I knew I would be criticized. I knew I would be accused of being disrespectful and hated by many for speaking up that way. & # 39;

City police later stepped forward and removed the protest from the Whitehall memorial

City police later stepped forward and removed the protest from the Whitehall memorial

Veteran who survived the 1974 IRA car bomb: the XR activist behind controversial protest against the cenotaph

Former infantryman Donald Bell

Former infantryman Donald Bell

As a young infantryman in the British Army, he was hit by shrapnel from an IRA car bomb that killed two other soldiers in Stewartstown in 1974.

Mr. Bell made four missions with the Royal Anglican Regiment.

These days he is fighting against climate change.

In February, he was seen digging the lawn at Trinity College, Cambridge, and was later arrested after being glued to a police car. He told reporters that he had written letters to the government for nearly 50 years but was always ignored.

He said, “We had to be more disruptive. I just felt compelled to do something for my children and grandchildren. & # 39;

Mr Bell, 64, said he wanted to highlight how climate change could cause more wars.

He said, “I took action today because I knew I would be criticized. I knew that if I spoke up that way, I would be accused of being disrespectful and hated by many.

“Memorial Day is never an easy time for veterans, and it has not been an easy decision for me.

“But I've served this country, I've served the people of this country, and the actions I have taken today are just that.

“Uncontrolled climate change means returning to a world at war. I can't watch and let that happen. It is my duty to act.

"This administration's own climate advisor, the Climate Change Committee, said last year that they are taking a 'dad's army' approach to protecting the UK population from the effects of climate change.

& # 39; Your report from June this year showed that the government has not achieved all but two of the 31 milestones it has set to reduce emissions.

“This government is criminally negligent and young people today will pay the price for their failure.

& # 39; I've done four tours in Northern Ireland. I was in a conflict. I saw good friends – my comrades with whom I served – die.

“Many of the people who attend the memorial service have never seen the horrors of war. I hope you never have to.

"However you feel about the action today, I want people to take up that message. If we don't deal with this climate emergency now, it will lead to war."

XR said in a post on its website: & # 39; The action aims to highlight the link between rising global temperatures and an increase in conflicts and wars.

"Research commissioned by the Defense Ministry in June this year suggests a growing understanding that climate change can exacerbate existing threats to international peace and security."

XR said in a post on its website: "The action aims to highlight the link between rising global temperatures and an increase in conflicts and wars."

Pictured: The protest today

XR said in a post on its website: "The action aims to highlight the link between rising global temperatures and an increase in conflicts and wars."

The three strong protesters bow their heads during their demonstration in the cenotaph today

The three strong protesters bow their heads during their demonstration in the cenotaph today

How did DID climate anarchists cost the taxpayer £ 15 million in one year?

APRIL 1

Around 12 protesters were arrested after undressing and taping on glass during a debate on Brexit in the gallery of the House of Commons.

APRIL 15th

Thousands gathered in Oxford Circus, Marble Arch, Waterloo Bridge and around Parliament Square.

Five activists, including XR co-founder Simon Bramwell, were arrested for criminal harm when targeting Shell's headquarters near Waterloo.

APRIL 16

On the second day of action on Waterloo Bridge, police began arresting people at 12:40 p.m. but stopped a few hours later when the force ran out of cells.

By the end of the day, an estimated 500,000 people had been affected and 290 activists had been arrested in London.

17TH APRIL

Two activists climbed onto the roof of a Docklands Light Railway train at Canary Wharf station while another stuck to its side and disrupted rail traffic.

Major police marched into Parliament Square, arrested people and partially removed roadblocks before protesters retook it later that night.

APRIL 18

Around 428 people had been arrested at the time.

APRIL 19TH

A dozen teenagers, some ages 13 and 14, walked out with a banner that read, "Are we the last generation?" To the Healthrow access road. They were surrounded by the police.

By late evening, 682 people had been arrested in London during the demonstrations.

APRIL 25

The London Stock Exchange is blocked by protesters who have glued themselves to the entrance with LED signs.

Four protesters boarded a Docklands Light Railway train in Canary Wharf.

Activists gathered in Hyde Park to end the eleven day protest.

JULY 13-14

A weekend of protest in east London included a mass bike ride, traffic blockades and talks in London Fields.

SEPTEMBER 14

London Fashion Week focused on Victoria Beckham's show, which was interrupted by a swarm of protesters.

SEPTEMBER 15

200 people gathered for a "funeral march" from an H&M in Trafalgar Square to a fashion week venue in The Strand.

SEPTEMBER 21st

Tried to block the port of Dover by marching on the A20.

OCTOBER 3

A fire engine was used to spray fake blood around the Treasury in central London.

OCTOBER 6

Thousands of demonstrators attended the opening ceremony at Marble Arch.

OCTOBER 7

Thousands of people blocked the center of London with various demonstrations.

DECEMBER 4

Half a dozen activists in yellow and black bee clothes held an action during the Liberal Democrats' election campaign in Streatham, south London.

9TH OF DECEMBER

Activists blocked a street in central London to demand that the next government tackle air pollution in London.

FEBRUARY 17

Members of the University of Cambridge's Extinction Rebellion gathered to dig a lawn outside Trinity College.

It added: “Today's action calls on the government to take action to stave off the rise in unrest, conflict and war anticipated by the Defense Department report.

& # 39; The Climate Change Committee, which advises the government on reducing emissions and reports on its progress, announced in June this year that the government had only reached two of its 31 milestones and with only four of the 21 in the EU identified indicators on track was the path to zero emissions.

"The action indicates that, in this context, it is an act of remembrance to speak about the consequences of an untested warning."

The XR protesters put up banners and wreaths without being challenged by the police.

It was in stark contrast to Remembrance Sunday when Scottish Guard veteran bagpiper Ben Buckland, 47, a veteran from Romford, east London, was filmed marching onto the police barricade guarding the cenotaph

He was seen stumbling backwards before falling to the ground, causing an uproar among other members of the public who stood with him at the police line.

However, a separate video has since appeared in which the piper brags, "Sometimes you have to create something to get what you want," as he admits that "I actually did it". I provoked them. & # 39;

Police confirmed that Mr. Buckland, who worked in security and heads an anti-poaching unit, was arrested on suspicion of a joint attack on a rescue worker.

XR's most recent stunt came as homes across the UK fell silent on Armistice Day commemorating the Nation's War Day when the coronavirus pandemic curtailed public commemorations.

People were encouraged to take a break at the front door or window for the traditional two-minute silence at 11am on Wednesday.

Covid-19 restrictions on gatherings and travel have disrupted memorial events this year, forcing the memorial service at the cenotaph to be scaled back last weekend.

XR's stunt met with anger among veterans and on the internet when social media users described the group as "really shameful".

One person wrote: "Really shameful: Extinction rebellions have put a wreath" Climate change means war "on the cenotaph.

"These privileged fools seem to be doing whatever it takes to turn public opinion against them."

Another person added, 'There's a place and a time … and it's not.

"If it hadn't been for those who fought and died … this self-righteous" bright "rebellion wouldn't even see light or day!

& # 39; IT'S EASY! Hence … "NO RESPECT". "

Another person wrote, “Extinction Rebellion really knows how to lose support for their cause.

& # 39; Your members are now being scrapped. You need a new PR representative. & # 39;

Jake Wright wrote: "I bet the London police will do nothing at all about the disgusting behavior the Extinction Rebellion is doing today with its protest at the London cenotaph and protests in London."

One woman said, “Extinction Rebellion activists hijack the cenotaph on Memorial Day in protest against climate change. Are you serious. No Memorial Day for the rest of us, but is that allowed? You disgust me, be ashamed. & # 39;

Another said, "I can't believe the Extinction Rebellion civic group" hung this "Climate Change is War" banner on the cenotaph on Memorial Day. No respect at all. You should be ashamed of yourself. & # 39;

One report commented: & # 39; Cowardly scum. Extinction Rebellion activists hijack the cenotaph on Memorial Day in protest against climate change. & # 39;

Another said online: "Can you imagine more insults to the nation and the victims of the dead than the action of these spoiled brats?)) Extinction Rebellion activists hijack the cenotaph on Memorial Day in protest against climate change."

Brian Higginson added, "Really shameful: Extinction rebellions have put a wreath" Climate change means war "on the cenotaph. Pure scum."

Due to the restrictions of the coronavirus, veterans had to spend Armistice Day at home today.

An invitation-only service scheduled for Wednesday at Westminster Abbey in London marked the 100th anniversary of the Unknown Warrior's funeral.

The television service, which the Prince of Wales and the Duchess of Cornwall will attend, will commemorate the funeral of an unknown British soldier whose body was brought back from northern France.

He was buried on November 11, 2020 at the western end of the abbey nave to depict all those who lost their lives in World War I, but whose place of death was unknown or whose bodies were never found.

The poet award winner Simon Armitage has written a new poem entitled "The Bed", which commemorates the 100th anniversary of this funeral.

The poem shows how the fallen soldier is transported from "broken and rough asleep in a grave" to "among sleepy poets and dozing saints".

It concludes, "All of this for a soul, with no name or rank or age or home because you are the son we have lost and your rest is ours."

Every year the two-minute silence on the day of the armistice marks the end of this four-year conflict after an agreement between Germany and the Allies came into force on the "11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month" of 1918.

The service and silence will be broadcast live on BBC One starting at 10:30 am and will be hosted by the Dean of Westminster, The Very Reverend Dr. David Hoyle, directed.

It will also include a talk by the Archbishop of Canterbury, The Most Reverend and Rt Hon Justin Welby.

General Sir Nick Carter, Chief of Defense Staff, the professional chief of the armed forces, said: “The funeral of the Unknown Warrior a hundred years ago was a defining moment for the British people.

To many of those who stood in silence or made pilgrimages to Westminster he was not at all unknown.

His anonymity meant that he was the father, husband, son, or brother who never came home from the war.

"Today the Tomb of the Unknown Warrior reminds us that war is costly and that we should never forget those who sacrificed their lives for our free and open way of life."

Wednesday also marks 100 years since the inauguration of the permanent version of the cenotaph memorial in Whitehall in central London.

A troop of the household cavalry pays their respects in the cenotaph early in the morning

A troop of the household cavalry pays their respects in the cenotaph early in the morning

Defense Secretary Ben Wallace said: “The centenary of the unveiling of the cenotaph and the burial of the Unknown Warrior are poignant reminders of the scale of the casualties in World War I and the continuing importance of coming together as a nation to remember all those who who sacrificed their lives for this country & # 39;

Defense Secretary Ben Wallace said: “The 100th anniversary of the unveiling of the cenotaph and the burial of the Unknown Warrior are a poignant reminder of the scale of the casualties in World War I and the continuing importance of coming together as a nation to remember all those who who sacrificed their lives for this country & # 39;

Elsewhere, more than 100 wreaths of poppies will be brought on board the early morning trains to London on Wednesday

On Wednesday, more than 100 poppy wreaths will be brought to London on board the early morning trains elsewhere

Wednesday also marks 100 years since the inauguration of the permanent version of the cenotaph memorial in Whitehall in central London

Wednesday also marks 100 years since the inauguration of the permanent version of the cenotaph memorial in Whitehall in central London

Mounted police pass the cenotaph with wreaths in Whitehall in central London today

Mounted police pass the cenotaph with wreaths in Whitehall in central London today

A troop of household cavalry pays their respects in the cenotaph this early morning

A troop of household cavalry pays their respects in the cenotaph this early morning

Defense Secretary Ben Wallace said: “The 100th anniversary of the unveiling of the cenotaph and the burial of the Unknown Warrior are a poignant reminder of the scale of the casualties in World War I and the continuing importance of coming together as a nation to remember all those who who sacrificed their lives for this country. & # 39;

On Wednesday, more than 100 wreaths of poppies will be brought on board the early morning trains to London elsewhere.

The Great Western Railway has partnered with military charities, local government agencies and military bases for the Poppies to Paddington operation, which will include nine trains and more than 60 stations.

Upon arrival at Paddington Station, the wreaths will be placed on the platform on the platform at 11 a.m. sharp on their war memorial.

Towards the end of the day, people are also encouraged to gaze up at the night sky from home in another collective moment of remembrance.

The Commonwealth War Graves Commission (CWGC), which oversees war memorials and cemeteries around the world, urges the public to take a moment at 7 p.m. to look up at the stars.

Last month, XR was beaten up for going home to Sir David Attenborough's house before being turned away by his daughter, who said they were protecting themselves from Covid-19.

Eco-warriors delivered a letter and "gifts" including an olive tree to the naturalist's home in Richmond yesterday after he warned protesters not to break the law

Eco-warriors yesterday delivered a letter and "gifts" including an olive tree to the naturalist's home in Richmond after he warned protesters not to break the law

Extinction Rebellion protesters are blocking access to a print shop in Broxbourne, Hertfordshire, and leaving the shelves of some newsagents empty Saturday morning

Extinction Rebellion protesters are blocking access to a print shop in Broxbourne, Hertfordshire, and leaving the shelves of some newsagents empty Saturday morning

They delivered a "civil disobedience starter kit" to his home in Richmond, west London, after he warned them not to break the law.

They said the 94-year-old's influence and comments "are helping to eradicate the voices and victims of front-line earth protectors around the world".

The four women and two men said they were hoping to deliver the delivery in person, so it "came across as a friend of a friend who wanted to reach him where he lives".

But Sir David's daughter Susan told them he would not open the door amid the coronavirus pandemic.

In September protesters blocked printing plants for national newspapers, one of the protesters blocking the British media was worse than the Nazis.

More than 100 protesters turned against newspaper printers in Broxbourne, Hertfordshire and Knowsley near Liverpool and blocked the newspapers.

Donnachadh McCarthy, 61, emerged as one of the group's leaders, justifying the attack by saying, “It's like World War II, and you (the newspapers) are on the other side. That's how we see it.

“It puts you on the side of the existential threat. It's a different existential threat, but a bigger one than the Nazis. & # 39;

What is Extinction Rebellion and what do they want?

"Extinction Rebellion is an international movement that uses nonviolent civil disobedience to stop mass extinction and the risk of social collapse," the About page on its website said.

The environmental protest group held its first demonstration in Parliament Square on October 31, 2018.

The worldwide group wants to change the power structure in order to remove the authority of the central governments.

The website states: "We understand that we need to organize ourselves to meet our own needs. This, in the context of the Extinction Rebellion, means that we are working to balance power by destroying the usual pillars of power, that determine our life. "

The environmental protest group held its first demonstration in Parliament Square on October 31, 2018

The environmental protest group held its first demonstration in Parliament Square on October 31, 2018

Since 2018, members of the group have gathered at London Fashion Week, the House of Commons and various other locations in central London.

On Wednesday morning, April 17, 2019, two activists climbed onto the roof of a Docklands Light Railway train at Canary Wharf station while another stuck to one side and disrupted rail traffic.

The following day, the three activists were charged with blocking trains. After pleading not guilty, they were sent to jail for four weeks without bail until they waited for their next hearing.

On February 17, 2020, members of the University of Cambridge's Extinction Rebellion dug a lawn in front of Trinity College in protest of their investment in oil and gas companies. The excavated mud was later taken to a local Halifax office.

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