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Experts urge ministers not to overreact to rising coronavirus cases


Ministers do not need to panic yet as coronavirus cases are increasing in the UK. Leading experts insisted today after it became known that Boris Johnson feared a second wave could begin in 14 days.

A senior government source told the mail that the prime minister was "extremely concerned" about outbreaks that "blew up" both at home and across Europe. An increase in infections across Spain prompted the decision at the last minute to include the vacation hotspot in the quarantine of the UK.

But Professor Paul Hunter, an infectious disease specialist at the University of East Anglia, tried to calm the nation today and said, "Give us a couple of weeks before we panic." He said MailOnline cases in the UK are increasing but not escalating quickly, and said it is possible that we could endure August without new blanket measures to prevent another crisis.

Dr. Gail Carson, director of ISARIC, the International Consortium for Severe Acute Respiratory and New Infections, added: "We knew the virus was not being cleared and we should learn to live with it."

The blockade imposed on March 23 has paralyzed the economy and caused thousands of job losses, as fears that Britain is on the way to the worst recession in 300 years. Businesses have already warned that businesses "can be put down once, but not twice," and said today that "health and business go hand in hand."

Top scientists warned that the block would be lifted when millions of Brits flocked to pubs earlier this month to celebrate "Super Saturday" and to enjoy their first taste of freedom in the 15-week boiling pan and it'll just overflow ".

Although the number of cases in the UK is relatively small, increases have been recorded every day for the first time since the peak in April last week. The seven-day average is almost 700 – 28 percent more than three weeks ago.

Ministers have warned of a possible second wave of the pandemic this winter, but fear that it may occur earlier. During a visit to Nottingham yesterday, Mr. Johnson said the British should not be on guard.

He added: "The important thing is that everyone in all communities follows the advice, follows the advice, does not accidentally spread it, and puts it down properly, and we will be able to relax restrictions across the country.

"But I'm afraid we are now clearly facing the risk of a second wave in other parts of Europe and we just have to be vigilant."

It comes after a leading virologist warned Germany – where infections almost doubled from week to week – that a second block cannot be avoided if it is struck by a second wave of coronavirus cases.

In other corona virus developments today:

  • Ministers warned that there is no silver bullet to save the summer vacation abroad, claiming that Belgium, Luxembourg and Croatia could soon be added to the UK travel quarantine list.
  • Number 10 signed a contract with pharmaceutical giants GlaxoSmithKline and Sanofi Pasteur for 60 million doses of a fourth experimental Covid-19 vaccine – although it has not yet been tested on humans.
  • Nursing homes were "blamed on the wolves" during the pandemic and government measures were "at times negligent," the MPs said in a damning report.
  • The cost of Number 10's vacation program has exceeded £ 30 billion this week – but won't prevent unemployment from rising above 10 percent, a leading think tank warned.
  • Oldham is the youngest place to see stricter corona virus restrictions after Leicester was overhauled to be the second most affected area in England, with an increase of nearly 200 percent in cases in the past week.

A senior government source told Mail that the Prime Minister (who is jogging today on a public footpath near Checkers with his dog Dilyn near Checkers) is "extremely concerned" about outbreaks that are "bubbling up" both at home and across Europe.

Professor Paul Hunter, an infectious disease specialist at the University of East Anglia, said:

Professor Paul Hunter, an infectious disease specialist at the University of East Anglia, said: "Give us a couple of weeks before we panic."

Mr Johnson is said to have been startled by the resurgence of the virus in parts of the United States and Europe after the blockade was loosened.

Cases in Spain doubled last week, while the Belgian government warned of a second "complete block" unless the outbreaks get under control.

The head of the German health authority said yesterday that he was "very concerned" about rising infection rates.

A Downing Street source said, "The Prime Minister is extremely concerned about what he sees abroad and fears that we could see the same thing here in a fortnight.

“People have to realize that we are still in the middle of a pandemic. He wants to open things up and get people back to work, but he knows that if something goes wrong it will be his head on the block. & # 39;

It comes after a World Health Organization official said last night that any peaks in cases are not a sign of a second wave and revealed that the pandemic is only turning into a "big wave".

Margaret Harris of the UN agency said, "The best thing is to plate it and turn it into something that is at your feet."

BELGIUM, LUXEMBOURG AND CROATIA "ADD TO UK TRAVEL QUARANTINE LIST"

Ministers today warned that there is no silver bullet to save the summer vacation abroad and claim that Belgium, Luxembourg and Croatia could soon be added to the UK travel quarantine list.

The British government announced on Saturday that it would ban all non-essential travel to Spain. Travelers returning to the UK have to isolate themselves for 14 days.

This decision sparked a diplomatic dispute with Madrid, but Mr. Johnson insisted that the United Kingdom reserve the right to impose restrictions to prevent domestic increases in some cases.

It is now believed that Belgium and Luxembourg could be removed from the safe travel list tomorrow. In the meantime, ministers are expected to monitor the situation in Croatia closely, but according to The Times, action against this country is not expected to be imminent.

The travel industry urges the government to shorten the 14-day quarantine period to make travel abroad more practical in the face of these uncertainties. The head of Heathrow Airport suggests border tests could be the answer. But Minister of Culture Oliver Dowden poured cold water on the plan today, saying that there is currently no "viable alternative to 14-day quarantine".

Professor Linda Bauld, a public health expert at the University of Edinburgh, told The Guardian: "The second wave is currently not a term we would use (in epidemiology) because the virus has not disappeared."

"It is in our population, it has spread to 188 countries so far, and what we are seeing now are essentially localized peaks or a localized return of a large number of cases."

Professor Hunter spoke about the reappearance of the virus in the UK and told MailOnline: “I don't care what you call it, there is no really correct definition that is generally accepted, what is a second wave and what is not.

"However, the reality is that the number of cases is increasing again in several European countries." One of the great things we are seeing right now is that most areas in the UK are still infection free.

& # 39; And most of the increase is in a relatively small part of the UK area. This seems to be the case in Spain and probably in other countries as well. & # 39;

When asked how to deal with an increase in infections, he added: “You can really see local increases and apply local locks, or you can reintroduce national restrictions that we recently relaxed.

“At the moment it is going so fast, but not so fast (maybe) that we could survive August – but then really tough decisions have to be made in September or October.

"If it increases like in Spain, difficult decisions will have to be made very soon." He added that he was hopeful but not confident that the current whack-a-mole-style strategy was sufficient to combat local flare-ups.

Apocalyptic forecasts by the Bank of England and others have already shown that Britain is on the way to the worst recession in 300 years when the Great Frost conquered Europe due to the closure.

Chancellor Rishi Sunak has warned that there will be "unprecedented pain" while the prestigious IFS think tank has described the impending collapse as a "mega-recession" or "recession to end all recessions".

The number of people receiving unemployment benefits rose a record-high from 856,500 to 2.1 million in the first month of Coronavirus blocking, despite the vacation program, in which millions remain formally in work.

Matthew Fell, chief executive of the Confederation of British Industry in the UK, told MailOnline today: & # 39; Many companies are gradually and safely reopening after a long hibernation.

“During the pandemic, companies knew that health and business go hand in hand.

& # 39; Companies are committed to making their full contribution to minimizing the risk of further increases and following government guidelines to ensure that their jobs are Covid-safe.

"Working safely is the best way to get the economy back on its feet while protecting jobs and livelihoods."

Whitehall sources confirmed yesterday that Mr. Johnson's caution was reflected in the controversial decision to extend Spain's travel ban to the country's Balearic and Canary Islands, where the number of cases is lower.

The decision triggered a diplomatic conflict with Spain and the nation Prime Minister Pedro Sanchez described the travel restrictions as "mistakes" and Tourists in most regions would be safer than in the UK.

Boris Johnson introduced himself yesterday when he visited Nottingham, where he expressed fears of a second attack on Covid-19

Boris Johnson introduced himself yesterday when he visited Nottingham, where he expressed fears of a second attack on Covid-19

The latest figures show that the number of new cases in Spain is increasing rapidly. At the weekend, 6,361 new cases were announced, compared to 4,581 the previous year. France announced 2,551 new coronavirus cases on Monday

The latest figures show that the number of new cases in Spain is increasing rapidly. At the weekend, 6,361 new cases were announced, compared to 4,581 the previous year. France announced 2,551 new coronavirus cases on Monday

GERMANY IS NOT ABLE TO AVOID ANOTHER LOCKDOWN IF THE SECOND WAVE HITS, EXPERT WARNED

Germany will not be able to avoid a second blockage if it is hit by a second wave of coronavirus cases, a leading virologist has warned.

Jonas Schmidt-Chanasit said that "drastic measures" would be on the table again if the German health system were overwhelmed by virus cases – a nightmare scenario that Germany has avoided so far.

Fear of a second wave is increasing in Germany after an increase of 4,127 new cases last week compared to 2,385 two weeks ago.

Experts are concerned because the virus spreads across the country and is not limited to a handful of local clusters. The R rate is now regularly above 1.0.

Schmidt-Chanasit from the University of Hamburg told ARD yesterday evening that "the situation is still manageable" but warned that it could "get out of control very quickly".

When asked about a possible second ban, he said: "In the worst case, if we really get a second wave – I define it as overwhelming our healthcare system – we won't be able to avoid very dramatic, very drastic measures. But that's exactly what we want to avoid. & # 39;

Germany has suffered four daily jumps from 600 or more coronavirus cases in the past six days after not seeing any since the end of June

Germany has suffered four daily jumps from 600 or more coronavirus cases in the past six days after not seeing any since the end of June

Transport Minister Grant Shapps and Foreign Minister Dominic Raab are both said to have spoken out against the extension of the travel ban to the Spanish islands, which the Prime Minister overruled on Monday.

Ministers decided to quarantine Spain again after it was found that 10 British coronaviruses had returned from the country, and Professor Chris Whitty said "doing nothing is not an option" was announced yesterday.

As the ministers warned today, there is no silver bullet to save the summer vacation abroad, and claims that Belgium and Luxembourg could soon be added to the UK travel quarantine list.

In the meantime, ministers are expected to monitor the situation in Croatia closely, but according to The Times, action against this country is not expected to be imminent.

A Whitehall source said: “The Prime Minister was determined to ensure that we have a clear and consistent message about Spain, regardless of the situation in each region.

"That's fair enough, but you can see why Spain is upset because it treats the whole country as if it were as bad as the worst region."

The government source – which was not mentioned – added: "If other countries did this to us, they would judge the whole country according to the situation in Leicester."

The figures released yesterday show that the rolling 7-day average of cases continued to increase over the month, from 546 cases on July 5 to 697 on July 25 – an increase of 28 percent.

Downing Street admitted last night that the prime minister was concerned about the situation abroad, but downplayed the idea that the risk of an upturn in Britain was imminent.

There are no immediate plans to reinstate restrictions nationwide. A # 10 source said, "We haven't seen a sharp rise yet, but we're concerned.

“We don't want to know what some other countries are experiencing, and it would be a thorn in our side if we weren't looking for steps to prevent it.

“That means we have to make sure that we don't import cases from abroad. But it also means that people here have to be vigilant and maintain social distance.

"The virus didn't migrate for the summer and we always said that if we have to, we'll put the handbrake back on."

It is believed that Professor Whitty is concerned about the risk of the virus being "sown" by vacationers returning from abroad, especially since many people who get the virus show no symptoms.

He also monitors about a dozen boroughs that have been put on an “watch list” because of high or rapidly increasing infection rates, including Peterborough, Northampton, Luton, Leicester, Rochdale and Bradford.

Spanish Prime Minister Pedro Sanchez has claimed that tourists in his country are safer than in the UK. These are the worst coronavirus hotspots in each country and the number of coronavirus cases per 100,000 people

Spanish Prime Minister Pedro Sanchez has claimed that tourists in his country are safer than in the UK. These are the worst coronavirus hotspots in each country and the number of coronavirus cases per 100,000 people

OLDHAM TAKES OVER LEICESTER TO BE THE SECOND WORST AREA IN ENGLAND – WHERE ARE THE CURRENT HOTSPOTS?

Oldham is the youngest place to see stricter corona virus restrictions after Leicester was overhauled to be the second most affected area in England, with an increase of nearly 200 percent in cases in the past week.

Official NHS statistics show that 128 people were diagnosed with Covid-19 in the Greater Manchester city over the seven days to July 26. This corresponds to a rate of 54.3 cases per 100,000 people.

By comparison, the rate in Leicester – the only place in the UK affected by a local blockage – is 53.2. Blackburn with Darwen is the current hotspot at a rate of 85.9.

Oldham's council chairmen yesterday urged all of the district's 235,000 residents not to let visitors into their home for at least two weeks to "prevent a strict local ban from being imposed."

It puts Oldham in conflict with the rest of England after the blockade rules were finally relaxed earlier this month so people could stay with loved ones after not being allowed to go to other homes for months.

Anyone living in the Greater Manchester area was asked to be two meters from friends and family when they saw them outside. Current government recommendations for the rest of the nation recommend a one-meter-plus rule – but people should be two meters apart if possible.

Which areas currently have the highest infection rates?

Blackburn with Darwen

Oldham

Leicester

Bradford

Trafford

Rochdale

Sandwell

Calderdale

Manchester

Kirklees

85.9 – plus 6%

54.3 – plus 191%

53.2 – minus 27%

45.1 – plus 6%

36.8 – plus 235%

32.7 – 31% less

30.9 – plus 33%

28.6 – plus 22%

22.1 – plus 55%

19.8 – minus 29%

Source: NHS. Data refer to cases registered between July 20-26, the latest available numbers

GOVERNMENT SIGNED £ 500MILL OFFER WITH GSK AND SANOFI FOR 60MILLION CAN OF FOURTH FOUR COVID-19 VACCINE

Ministers today signed a contract with pharmaceutical giants GlaxoSmithKline and Sanofi Pasteur for 60 million doses of another potential Covid-19 vaccine.

Number 10 has now secured four different types of unproven coronavirus shocks, giving the UK access to a total of 250 million doses – enough to give everyone four in the UK if they work.

Scientists have not yet tested the GSK / Sanofi vaccine on humans, and studies showing that it works won't start until September.

The Department of Enterprise, Energy and Industry Strategy said the vaccine – supposedly costing £ 500m – could be given to high-risk Britons in the first half of next year if studies show it works.

The UK has started to support experimental jabs around the world in its spread bet approach last month, hoping that at least one of them will pay off.

The health leaders hope that the Oxford University vaccine they bought – one of the frontrunners in the scientific race to end the pandemic – will be ready before the end of the year.

Oldham is the youngest place to see stricter corona virus restrictions after Leicester was overhauled to be the second most affected area in England, with an increase of nearly 200 percent in cases in the past week.

Official NHS statistics show that 128 people were diagnosed with Covid-19 in the Greater Manchester city over the seven days to July 26. This corresponds to a rate of 54.3 cases per 100,000 people.

By comparison, the rate in Leicester – the only place in the UK affected by a local blockage – is 53.2. Blackburn with Darwen is the current hotspot at a rate of 85.9.

Oldham's council chairmen yesterday urged all of the district's 235,000 residents not to let visitors into their home for at least two weeks to "prevent a strict local ban from being imposed."

It puts Oldham in conflict with the rest of England after the blockade rules were finally relaxed earlier this month so people could stay with loved ones after not being allowed to go to other homes for months.

Anyone living in the Greater Manchester area was asked to be two meters from friends and family when they saw them outside. Current government recommendations for the rest of the nation recommend a one-meter-plus rule – but people should be two meters apart if possible.

It comes after the Royal Bank of Scotland ordered more than 50,000 employees last week to work from home by next year, and was considering the possibility of a second wave in the decision, the Times reported.

The NatWest owner, one of the UK's largest employers, informed employees in a memo that they could work from home by 2021.

The next boss, Simon Wolfson, said: “There is still a lot of uncertainty and our central scenario cannot be trusted with the confidence that our leadership would normally have at this time of year.

"The duration of the rules for social distancing, consumer behavior after the ban, income, unemployment and, above all, the question of whether the second wave will be blocked are not known."

Josh Hardie, deputy director general of the Confederation of British Industry, said last month: “Any plan to return to work must ensure employee safety. Companies have made tremendous efforts to protect their workforce. However, concerns about infections remain high.

“Due to the low demand and the low number of visitors on many main roads, companies are struggling and increasing unemployment. Companies know that returning to the office must not risk a spike in infection. Firms can be knocked down once, not twice. & # 39;

Dozens of companies, including London-based construction company Bouygues UK, have changed their operations in the event of a further increase.

Rob Bradley, its managing director, told Construction News: "We have now prepared to work in a Covid environment when we had not done so in March." Nobody had heard of social distancing; nobody had heard of vacation.

"We invested a lot in planning the work in a Covid environment, so we were able to put our locations back into operation." (If there is a second wave) I'm glad that we as a company have gone to the right level to protect our people and employees on our websites.

"What I cannot prescribe is when the government says:" We will block the streets, close London or stop public transport. "

"If something like this happens, there is of course nothing I can do about it, but as far as we can control health and safety on our construction sites and in our offices (…) in a second wave, we have probably significantly reduced the risks. & # 39;

A Ryanair spokesman said: “It is impossible to predict how long the Covid 19 pandemic will last, and a second wave of Covid 19 cases across Europe in late autumn is currently our greatest fear.

“Hopefully, by introducing effective track and tracing systems and EU citizens by following recommended face masks, strict hand hygiene and other measures, EU governments will avoid the need for further barriers or restrictions on flights within the EU.

"It is important that European economies begin the recovery process this summer to minimize the damage caused by the Covid 19 pandemic. This recovery can only be triggered by air travel within the EU, which is the engine of growth and growth Economic activity of the EU. "

Ministers were informed today that UK companies need more support because of concerns that a second wave of corona viruses could appear within 14 days.

The gaps for workers in support programs, worker protection and poor corporate behavior during the crisis were highlighted by a Commons committee.

There are concerns about how long it could take for sectors like hospitality and aviation to recover, especially given the fact that a second wave of the pandemic may now be on its way.

In a letter to Secretary of Commerce Alok Sharma, the Westminster Committee on Business, Energy and Industry Strategy identified a number of areas for the government to address.

Labor MP Darren Jones said the government should now rethink its approach to providing sectoral support in the wake of the pandemic.

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