ENTERTAINMENT

Excessive training causes 74% of heat stroke cases in dogs


Dog owners should not take their beloved pets for a walk in hot weather, as excessive exercise is responsible for almost three quarters (74 percent) of all dog heat stroke cases.

The researchers found that warm weather alone was responsible for 13 percent of cases, while driving in or leaving hot vehicles accounted for another 5 percent.

Researchers from Nottingham Trent University and the Royal Veterinary College analyzed cases of heat stroke in dogs treated by British veterinarians.

Other triggers for the disease were treatment in veterinary surgeries or nursing salons, storage in hot buildings and being locked up under blankets.

Heat stroke – which can easily prove fatal to dogs – is a disease that veterinarians more often expect as global temperatures rise.

Dogs may experience heat stroke from physical activity on cooler days, the researchers warned.

Veterinarian Emily Hall says that walking a dog in hot weather can be as fatal as leaving it in a locked car.

She advises either to skip walks completely during the heat waves or to venture early in the morning when the temperatures are lower.

The advice comes as Britain is expected to swell again this week and temperatures are expected to exceed 30 ° C by Friday.

According to a study, 74% of heat stroke cases in dogs are responsible for excessive exercise when walking and playing. The warm weather alone was responsible for 13 percent of the cases, while driving in or leaving in hot vehicles accounted for another 5 percent.

KNOW THE SIGNS OF HEATSTROKE IN DOGS

Signs of heat stroke in dogs are:

  • Panting,
  • Red or dark gums / tongue,
  • Confusion and uncertainty,
  • To collapse,
  • Diarrhea or vomiting,
  • Seizure that can lead to coma.

Fast treatment is essential.

Heat stroke can occur all year round, but is most common in the UK between May and August.

In the study, the researchers analyzed anonymized clinical records of more than 900,000 dogs from across the UK and found that 1,222 had received heat stroke veterinary treatment at a certain point in their lives.

The team found that 14.2 percent of these canines died of the disease.

"When the world gets hotter, we have to involve our dogs in our strategies to stay cool, because if we don't protect them, they can have fatal consequences," said Dr. Hall.

"It seems that people are hearing the message about the dangers of hot vehicles, but campaigns to raise public awareness of heat-related diseases in dogs must emphasize that dogs don't just die in hot cars."

"Walking or walking with a dog in hot weather can be just as fatal, so think about whether you want to avoid walking in the heatwaves, or take dogs early in the morning while it's cool."

"We hope that our work will help educate people about the causes of dog heat stroke and provide key information to owners and veterinarians that can help identify the most vulnerable dogs."

Male or younger dogs are most susceptible to heat stroke from exercise. Susceptible breeds are Chow Chow, Bulldog, French Bulldog, Greyhound, English Springer Spaniel, Kavalier King Charles Spaniel and Staffordshire Bull Terrier.

Older dogs and those with flat faces – such as bulldogs and boobs – are now at an increased risk of heat stroke if they sit outside in hot weather.

Flat-faced dogs or brachycephaly are particularly at risk of developing heat stroke when left in hot cars.

This latest study builds on the researchers' previous work showing that brachycephalic dog breeds are at particular risk of heat stroke – and that parked cars can get hot enough from spring to fall to endanger a dog's health.

This latest study builds on the researchers' previous work showing that brachycephalic dog breeds are at particular risk of heat stroke - and that parked cars can get hot enough from spring to fall to endanger a dog's health

This latest study builds on the researchers' previous work showing that brachycephalic dog breeds are at particular risk of heat stroke – and that parked cars can get hot enough from spring to fall to endanger a dog's health

"Britain is currently in an unhappy love affair with flat-faced dogs," said Royal Veterinary College paper author and epidemiologist Dan O'Neill.

"The demand for breeds such as the French Bulldog, the Pug and the British Bulldog increased during the COVID-19 ban."

"I appeal to owners to put the dog's needs ahead of their own desire to have something that looks cute."

"Flat-faced dogs have a limited ability to stay cool by nature, and therefore often suffer terribly from hot weather, exercise, or even a short drive."

"Please think before you buy a dog with a flat face," he warned.

The full results of the study were published in the journal Animals.

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