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Essex declares "serious incident" over rising Covid cases


Essex today declared a "major incident" as the number of coronavirus cases threatens to overwhelm hospitals and ambulances queuing outside of A&E across the country due to the lack of beds and staff, MailOnline today may determine.

UK hospitals are running out of manpower, ward space and even pillows. Patients are treated by doctors in ambulances as they waited up to six hours to be admitted. In some cases, people were later diverted more than 100 miles away while some overcrowded London intensive care units asked major Yorkshire hospitals if they would accept some of their Covid patients.

On the day the UK vaccine Oxford / AstraZeneca was approved for use, Essex declared a "major incident" in its six hospitals that allowed patients to move patients to another location, expedite discharge, additional staff consult and cancel non-emergency treatments and operations. The Department of Health and Welfare is expected to set out today what assistance the Essex Government will provide.

Doctors in areas worst hit by the rising number of coronavirus cases have said they are "extremely fearful" and just days away from making "terrible decisions" about who to treat and who will die got to.

The chaos has been attributed to dwindling oxygen supplies, and NHS bosses say staff absenteeism is twice normal due to illness and self-isolation. Some hospitals are asking nurses to return early from the Christmas vacation, and the January leave is now being banned by some trusts.

Social media footage showed ambulance queues lined up outside Royal London Hospital in Whitechapel and Queen & # 39; s Hospital in Romford, both in east London and Kent, when NHS Providers' deputy general manager, Saffron Cordery, warned of pressure on the NHS "rising at an unsustainable rate".

There have also been reports of delays in hospitals in East Anglia, South Wales and Birmingham where doctors Punith Kempegowda tweeted: & # 39;I'm just getting out of an & e after another long day. Almost all of these ambulances wait more than 3 hours with patients in them because there is no place in the hospital to bring them in.

The increasing pressure on hospitals was as follows:

  • Critical Oxford / AstraZeneca Jab sealed UK medical regulator approval this morning. The injections are scheduled to start on Monday.
  • AstraZeneca's executive director has promised the company can deliver 2 million weekly doses of Oxford University's coronavirus vaccine.
  • Another 13 million people in England are expected to be immersed in Tier 4 today despite the vaccine breakthrough.
  • Secondary schools are expected to close on January 11th at the earliest – but academics want them to close by February. Boris Johnson will make the final decision today;

Southend: Essex hospitals are struggling under the weight of Covid cases (Southend University Hospital pictured today) resulting in a major incident being reported in the county that allows them to reroute patients and get government assistance

Queens Hospital, Romford: Doctors at PSA care for patients in ambulance parking lots as sources report shortages of A&E beds and oxygen

Queens Hospital, Romford: Doctors at PSA care for patients in ambulance parking lots as sources report shortages of A&E beds and oxygen

East London: Ambulances piled up outside the Royal London Hospital in Whitechapel today as hospitals battled for hospital care

East London: Ambulances piled up outside the Royal London Hospital in Whitechapel today as hospitals battled for hospital care

Birmingham: A doctor said ambulances waited for hours to admit patients at Queen Elizabeth Hospital in England's second largest city

Birmingham: A doctor said ambulances waited for hours to admit patients at Queen Elizabeth Hospital in England's second largest city

East Anglia: A doctor tweeted this picture refuting a sarcastic message that hospitals are not full

East Anglia: A doctor tweeted this picture refuting a sarcastic message that hospitals are not full

Romford: The queue continued at the hospital, which is in a London borough but is also part of the Essex Resilience Forum, which has been classified as a "serious incident".

Romford: The queue continued at the hospital, which is in a London borough but is also part of the Essex Resilience Forum, which has been classified as a "serious incident".

Bridgend: Yesterday afternoon, nine ambulances lined up outside the Princess of Wales Hospital in South Wales

Bridgend: Yesterday afternoon, nine ambulances lined up outside the Princess of Wales Hospital in South Wales

The Oxford Covid vaccine is approved for use. The rollout is expected to begin on January 4th as millions more face Tier 4 and Matt Hancock will announce TODAY where tighter restrictions are required

Matt Hancock today hailed Oxford University and AstraZeneca approval for the critical vaccine, saying it means the UK will be out of the coronavirus crisis by spring – but also signaled that millions more people would be in a Tier 4 Lock to be overturned.

In a massive boom after the country posted a record 50,000 cases per day, the health minister insisted that a swift introduction of the sting now offers "high confidence" that the pandemic will be over within months.

Britain has ordered 100 million doses of the vaccine with supplies due today or tomorrow and the first bursts will begin on Monday.

Two doses are required to get long-term protection, but Mr Hancock said the stocks could be spread further than expected as the MHRA recommended increasing the gap between the first and second bursts from four weeks to 12 weeks extend .

The same rule will be applied to the Pfizer push approved back in early December, increasing the prospect that soon more Britons could get a single dose to ease the pressure on the NHS from rampant infections. Tony Blair has called for all available single-dose supplies to be used, with the booster lagging behind.

Mr. Hancock dodged, however, saying if he believed the number of animals vaccinated could be increased to the two million a week that scientists believe is necessary. And in addition to the positive news, he warned that the country is still facing an intensification of the brutal lockdown.

More than two-thirds of England are expected to be under the toughest curbs after a system review was announced in the House of Commons this afternoon – but there are calls for even more draconian national pressure that could result in secondary schools being closed and possibly curfew.

"It's going to be some difficult weeks," Hancock said in a round of interviews. "We have to take further action."

There are also growing concerns about the number of people in their forties and fifties who have no underlying health problems on wards or even show up in intensive care units, a London doctor said.

Doctors have said they are scared for the next few weeks as the number of inpatients has passed the first wave peak and cases now cross the 50,000 per day mark.

The consulting anesthetist Dr. Claudia Paoloni warned that the situation was only a few days away from the point where care would be rationed.

Dr. Paoloni, president of the Hospital Consultants and Specialists Association, told The Guardian, “Our NHS just doesn't have the beds to handle it. Some areas will be overwhelmed in a few days. When ventilation capacity is exceeded, terrible decisions must be made about those who live and die. & # 39;

She added that other life-defining decisions also need to be made, including which patients to admit to the intensive care unit and how long to continue treatment for patients who appear to be making no progress, such as when a patient with better chances of survival is the Hemodialysis machine that they use.

Leaked figures showed that England's critical care capacity is currently over 100 percent full in a number of hospitals in London, the Southeast and the East, reports the Health Service Journal.

Jenny Vaughan, Vice-Chair of the Doctors' Association UK, said: “DAUK has heard that patients have to be discharged from hospital due to lack of beds in intensive care units. The distances to hospitals in South East London are in some cases more than 100 miles. "

Dr. Vaughan said, “One of our members in North London reported that the increase in patients with Covid-19 meant that oxygen had to be maintained. DAUK is concerned about both patient safety and the effects of the pressures that staff are under.

"No lessons have been learned and the mistakes of the first wave are repeated as front-line staff treat sick patients in increasingly extreme conditions."

This morning Essex cAccording to the Essex Resilience Forum (ERF), prime ministers and health chiefs warned of "significantly growing demand" for hospitals across the county and will allow local executives to seek further government assistance.

The Broomfield Hospitals in Southend, Basildon and Chelmsford have warned that the number of Covid patients has "increased significantly and has put severe pressure on the emergency room", canceling non-urgent surgery. Queen & # 39; s Hospital is a Romford hospital that is also part of the ERF.

Leaked figures showed that England's critical care capacity is currently over 100 percent full in a number of hospitals in London, the Southeast and the East, reports the Health Service Journal.

The Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Woolwich in south-east London declared a major event on Sunday because it was feared that they could run out of oxygen due to the number of coronavirus patients in its wards.

Today it was found that the sister hospital in Lewisham ran out of pillows on one of its covidal wards, which resulted in local residents offering to donate some through social media.

Lewisham and Greenwich NHS Trust tweeted: & # 39;Thank you for your concern and the very kind offers to buy us some, but we are insured and have brought additional pillows to the ward in question. & # 39;

A patient is taken to Southend University Hospital in Essex, where residents are asked to call 999 only in the event of a critical emergency

A patient is taken to Southend University Hospital in Essex, where residents are asked to call 999 only in the event of a critical emergency

Ambulance outside the Royal London Hospital in London, where hospitals now use more oxygen than usual

Ambulance outside the Royal London Hospital in London, where hospitals now use more oxygen than usual

Another image from the NHS critical care dashboard passed to HSJ revealed that the number of Covid-19 patients in intensive care units in London has doubled from 300 to 636 in the past two weeks

Another image from the NHS critical care dashboard passed to HSJ revealed that the number of Covid-19 patients in intensive care units in London has doubled from 300 to 636 in the past two weeks

Data from the NHS internal critical care capacity dashboard leaked to HSJ showed that London had far exceeded its maximum capacity with intensive care units 114 percent full Monday night

Data from the NHS internal critical care capacity dashboard leaked to HSJ showed that London had far exceeded its maximum capacity with intensive care units 114 percent full Monday night

Another 13 MILLION people could be plunged to Tier 4 TODAY despite vaccine breakthrough: The swaths of Cumbria, Lancashire and Midlands face the toughest curbs as Matt Hancock promises "further action" against the rising cases of Covid

Another 13 million people could face a brutal Level 4 lockdown today as Matt Hancock vowed "further action" to combat the growing coronavirus cases – despite a dramatic vaccine breakthrough.

The Minister of Health will announce that draconian pressures across England will be tightened, with parts of Cumbria, Lancashire and the Midlands most likely to be upgraded.

And he gave a grim signal this morning about the direction of travel, despite trying to mitigate the blow by applying for government clearance for Oxford / University AstraZeneca, which means the crisis will be "over" by spring.

In a round of interviews, Mr. Hancock pointed to rapidly increasing infections believed to be caused by the mutant Covid: "It will take some difficult weeks … We need to take further action."

He also announced that Education Secretary Gavin Williamson would announce changes to plans for the schools' return later in January. The secondary school is expected to keep the classrooms closed longer while the test systems are set up.

More than two-thirds of England – roughly 37 million people – could be under Tier 4 curbs, according to the latest system review announced in the House of Commons this afternoon. There is also increasing speculation about a "Tier 5" raid, which could include even stricter measures such as a curfew.

Around 24 million people, including London, much of the south and east, are already subject to the strictest stay-at-home instructions.

Health Department data shows parts of Cumbria could come next, with the Eden Infection District having a worse infection rate than dozen of districts already in Tier 4 – and one of the fastest growing outbreaks in the country.

The Essex Resilience Forum, made up of members of the NHS, emergency services and local authorities, said the number of Essex patients being treated for coronavirus has now increased to levels higher than at its peak first wave.

It added that these numbers are expected to continue to increase in the coming days and that cases are particularly high in Mid and South Essex. Southend University Hospital asked staff to cancel vacation and return to work to meet increasing demand.

Problem areas included critical care and bed capacity, staff illness and the ability to quickly discharge patients to safe environments.

Anthony McKeever, Executive Lead of the Mid and South Essex Health & Care Partnership, said: “We are taking all possible steps within the NHS and the broader Essex health and social partnerships to limit the impact on the NHS and the health system as a whole.

& # 39; This includes leveraging critical care capacity in other parts of Essex and the Eastern Region, as well as identifying additional locations and capacity to support patient discharge and ease pressure on hospitals.

& # 39; Our close working relationships enable us to respond effectively to support our local communities.

“I also want to pay tribute to all of the hard working colleagues who work tirelessly to support our communities throughout the system. They all do a great job in extremely difficult circumstances. & # 39;

BJ Harrington, Essex Police Chief and Co-Chair of the Essex Local Resilience Forum, said, “By declaring a major incident, we can seek further assistance from the government to deal with the severe pressures the health system is under from Covid- . 19th

"The Essex people have been great and only dial 999 or visit A&E in an emergency. We need this to continue as it helps protect the very limited capacity in our hospitals."

A junior doctor said he was surprised at the number of young Covid-19 patients he saw who did not have pre-existing medical conditions.

Dr. Yousef Eltuhamy, who works in a London hospital, appeared at the BBC Breakfast on Wednesday to share his experience of working on the front lines during the pandemic.

He told the program, "Every time I start my shift, I go to my intensive care unit and am only greeted with a sight that surprises me every time a number of patients are extremely unwell, all with the same terrible virus, all severely critically uncomfortable and look to myself and my colleagues to help them get better.

“This pressure is felt not only in the intensive care unit, but also in the emergency room, on the wards and in primary care.

"When I see things get worse, cases rise and approvals rise, I am very, very concerned about the future."

Later asked about the demographics of the patients he treated, he said, “It's really surprising.

"I didn't expect to see so many young people, people in their forties and fifties, patients with no medical history at all."

Dr. Eltuhamy said he himself contracted coronavirus in May, despite being fit and low-risk.

He added, "I really don't take this lightly and I don't think anyone should take this virus lightly, young or old."

The doctor said while everyone was "doing their best" to maximize capacity, there was a staff shortage.

"It's extremely difficult and everyone is really, really thin," he added.

A photo of the London Royal Hospital tonight showing a line of ambulances parked outside

A user shared a photo with the caption: 'Never seen RLH this crazy. Every corner of the Stepney Way entrance is full of it. & # 39;

Photos of London's Royal Hospital posted on social media tonight showing a line of ambulances parked outside. A user shared a photo with the caption: 'Never seen RLH this crazy. Every corner of the Stepney Way entrance is full of it. & # 39;

Romford: Last night social media filmed the chaos at Queens Hospital Romford

Romford: Last night social media filmed the chaos at Queens Hospital Romford

Southend University Hospital in Essex has asked staff to cancel vacation and return to work to meet increasing demand

Southend University Hospital in Essex has asked staff to cancel vacation and return to work to meet increasing demand

Basildon is among the hospitals in Essex that have warned that the number of Covid patients "has increased significantly and has put pressure on the emergency room".

Basildon is among the hospitals in Essex that have warned that the number of Covid patients "has increased significantly and has put pressure on the emergency room".

His comments were endorsed by Dame Donna Kinnair, Executive Director and Secretary General of the Royal College of Nursing.

Dame Donna also spoke to BBC Breakfast, saying that while she hoped public support for healthcare workers during the pandemic would make recruitment easier, nurse retention is likely to be an issue.

She said, "This has been dubbed one of the toughest years in NHS history and that's why the nurses have been working tirelessly on it since March when this pandemic was declared."

The situation in hospitals, which have reached the breaking point with record admissions of Covid, continued to worsen yesterday. Ambulances were lined up and many intensive care units were very busy.

It turns out that certain intensive care units in London have asked major hospitals in Yorkshire, more than 150 miles north, if they would agree to accept some patients.

It is unknown when patients will be transferred from the capital or whether Yorkshire hospitals will approve admission. NHS ICU patients are rarely moved that long.

A high-level intensive care unit confirmed to HSJ that a number of requests for referral of patients to hospitals in Tier 3 Yorkshire have been made due to a lack of capacity in the Tier 4 capital.

Data from the NHS internal critical care capacity dashboard leaked to HSJ showed that London had far exceeded its maximum capacity with intensive care units 114 percent full Monday night.

The southeast was not far behind with intensive care units with a capacity of 113 percent. In the east of England, the leaked capacity data shows units running at 100 percent.

In each of the regions mentioned, over 60 percent of patients who filled intensive care units suffered from Covid-19.

With over 100 percent capacity growth, the intensive care units will struggle to cope with the reallocation of staff from other hospital services.

Another image from the NHS critical care dashboard passed to HSJ found that the number of Covid-19 patients in intensive care units in London has doubled from 300 to 636 in the past two weeks.

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