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England had the highest number of deaths in Europe during the coronavirus pandemic


England suffered the highest number of deaths in Europe during the coronavirus pandemic. Astonishing numbers have emerged today given growing concerns about a second wave.

Government statisticians created an interactive map of mortality rates for each region in the UK. Data shows that the London borough of Brent was the most affected area in Great Britain.

By the end of May, England had the highest excess deaths in 21 European countries, according to the National Statistics Office (ONS) – more people died than average for all reasons. Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland were among the nine countries where deaths were above typical levels.

Other countries had higher "peak" deaths in excess between February and June, but England experienced the longest uninterrupted period of increased mortality, meaning that it had the highest excess mortality rate overall.

Excessive deaths include deaths for all reasons, not just the coronavirus. However, they can serve as evidence of how serious Covid 19 outbreaks were, for example in the UK, not everyone who died of the virus in the darkest days of the crisis was tested for lack of swab capacity.

Spain and Italy suffered the biggest "spikes" in excessive deaths, suggesting they were facing the toughest weeks of all the continent's nations. Bergamo, in the most affected region of Lombardy in Italy, recorded an astonishing 847.7 percent more deaths than usual in the week of March 20.

The UK's highest death toll was 357.5 percent at the peak of the UK crisis in the week ending April 17. Birmingham was the British city with the highest mortality rate at 249.7 percent in the same week, followed by London (226.7) and Manchester (198.4).

The numbers come when Matt Hancock denied fueling the panic and hysteria of Covid-19 after warning of a second wave of Covid-19 that "is starting to roll across Europe" towards the UK. The health minister said there was a "real risk" that Britain would be hit by another outbreak.

Ministers were asked to calm down about the threat of a second wave. Top scientists said Britain needed to learn to live with the corona virus. Business leaders have said it is "vital" that lockdown-crippled economies have a chance to recover this summer, while Labor MP Chris Bryant today called for clusters to be tackled with a "stiletto, not a sledgehammer." become.

He said: "It makes me so angry that the government is so relaxed with its language. There is no second wave in all of Europe. In some areas there are worrying signs of single peaks of an increased infection. & # 39;

The numbers came as:

  • Boris Johnson told the advisers that Britain must "act quickly" to avoid a second wave. Tomorrow more vacation destinations are to be added to the UK quarantine list.
  • Ministers confirmed that people who are now positive for coronavirus or have telltale symptoms will be asked to stay at home for ten days from the current seven-day self-isolation period.
  • Sir Patrick Vallance and Professor Chris Whitty want stricter border controls immediately after figures show that 1,300 people with Covid-19 entered the UK at the start of the pandemic.
  • England had the highest number of deaths in Europe due to the coronavirus pandemic, according to the National Statistics Office.
  • Leicester's blockage is being reviewed today – 48 hours earlier than expected, as official statistics show that the city's coronavirus infection rate has halved within 14 days.
  • Holiday giant Tui closes 166 high street stores in the UK and Republic of Ireland, the UK's largest tour operator announced.
  • According to a shocking study, up to 21,000 people have died from the unintended consequences of the ban, many of them due to lack of access to health care.

While England did not have the highest mortality rate, it had the longest uninterrupted mortality period in a country by comparison, which resulted in England having the highest mortality rate in Europe for the entire period. The dotted line represents the five-year average, the marine line shows the trend for people under 65, while the green line applies to people over 65

Birmingham was the British city with the highest mortality rate at 249.7 percent in the same week, followed by London (226.7) and Manchester (198.4%).

Birmingham was the British city with the highest mortality rate at 249.7 percent in the same week, followed by London (226.7) and Manchester (198.4%).

It was Spain and Italy that had the largest spikes in excessive deaths. The first 11 authorities with the highest surplus peaks were all in Italy and Spain in March. Bergamo reached 847.7 percent

It was Spain and Italy that had the largest spikes in excessive deaths. The first 11 authorities with the highest surplus peaks were all in Italy and Spain in March. Bergamo reached 847.7 percent

WHAT ARE EXCESSIVE DEATHS?

Excessive deaths are those that occur in addition to those expected to occur in the same period of an average year.

They are measured in the UK over a five year average.

For example, if the average number of deaths in the first week of April in the past five years was 10,000, the number will be 10,001. Person who dies this week, along with any other person who dies after them, is considered an excessive death.

Ministers admitted that "excessive deaths" are the most reliable measure of how many deaths the coronavirus actually contributed to.

They take into account not only infected people who died from Covid-19, but also those who died from the indirect effects of the outbreak.

The biggest contribution to this is expected to be people whose medical treatment has been interrupted or discontinued due to the pandemic, including people who have avoided going to the hospital. NHS data show that A&E visitor numbers have halved since March.

Edward Morgan of the ONS Health Analysis and Life Events Department said: & # 39; Due to the coronavirus pandemic, mortality rates in Western Europe rose exceptionally above average in 2015-2019 in the first half of 2020.

“The highest peak mortality at national level was recorded in Spain, with some areas in northern Italy and central Spain having an over-mortality rate of 847.7 percent of the average.

“While none of the four British nations had as high a mortality rate as Spain or the hardest hit areas of Spain and Italy, pandemic mortality was widespread across the UK, while in most countries it was more geographically localized from Western Europe.

"Combined with the relatively slow" end "of the pandemic in the UK, this meant that by the end of May, England had the highest relative mortality rate of any European country in comparison."

The ONS analyzed overall mortality patterns in the first half of 2020 for 29 European countries using data between January 3 (week 1) and the week ending June 12 (week 24).

Comparisons were made nationally in cities and areas – in England there are local authorities such as Buckinghamshire, Rutland and Norfolk.

The data can be visualized in an interactive tool that allows the user to search for their own local authority. A graphic is shown that shows in detail when this location peaked in excessive deaths during the pandemic.

All-cause mortality analysis enables experts to map the effects of the coronavirus pandemic not only on Covid-19 deaths, but also on excessive deaths that have occurred as an indirect result.

The wider impact of the coronavirus on health systems and society means that people have died who were not expected. For example, someone who has had a heart attack may have decided not to go to the hospital, delaying their care and leading to death.

When every country peaked at excessive mortality rates

When every country peaked at excessive mortality rates

In terms of major cities, the highest mortality rate in Madrid in the week ending March 27 was 432.7 percent. In the UK, Birmingham had the highest mortality rate of any major UK city in the week to April, at 249.7 percent 17

In terms of major cities, the highest mortality rate in Madrid in the week ending March 27 was 432.7 percent. In the UK, Birmingham had the highest mortality rate of any major UK city in the week to April, at 249.7 percent 17

By the end of May, England had the highest number of deaths in excess of 21 European countries compared to the National Statistics Office - deaths for all reasons above the level normally expected. Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland were among the nine countries where deaths were above typical levels

By the end of May, England had the highest number of deaths in excess of 21 European countries compared to the National Statistics Office – deaths for all reasons above the level normally expected. Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland were among the nine countries where deaths were above typical levels

WHICH 10 CITIES HAVE THE HIGHEST PEAKS IN EXCESSIVE DEATHS?

Cities with the highest mortality rates in%

Madrid: 432.7 a week until March 27

Barcelona: 285.9 a week until April 3

Birmingham: 249.7 a week through April 17th

London: 226.7 a week through April 17th

Manchester: 198.4 a week through April 17th

Brussels: 201 a week until April 10th

Paris: 151.7 a week until April 3

Stockholm: 149.9 a week through April 10

Milan: 149 a week until March 27

Amsterdam: 106 a week until April 10th

Experts say that the best way to measure the extent of the effects of Covid-19 is to investigate excessive deaths.

The ONS compares the number of deaths over a period to the five-year average in that nation.

A value of 100 percent means that the mortality rate in a given week was 100 percent higher or twice as high as the five-year average.

By the end of May, there were nine countries with more deaths during the pandemic.

England had seen the most, with 7.55 percent more deaths compared to the five-year average, the highest of all countries. This was the case for both people under 65 (5.65 percent) and people over 65 (7.88 percent).

After England, Spain (6.65 percent), Scotland (5.11 percent) and Belgium (3.89 percent) were the three countries with the highest cumulative mortality rates.

Wales and Northern Ireland also had more deaths than usual, 2.78 percent and two 2.03 percent, respectively.

Only in the UK and Spain had there been excessive deaths among people under 65 who shot above zero until the end of May.

Nine countries – including Belgium, Sweden, the Netherlands and France – had values ​​above zero for their over 65s.

Older people are most susceptible to heavy Covid-19, which would have been felt in older populations worldwide. Deaths indirectly caused by Covid-19 could be due to restricted access to health care in other conditions.

CORONAVIRUS R RATE & # 39; IS ABOVE THE DESCRIBED LEVEL OF A SOUTHWEST AND SOUTHEAST & # 39;

The coronavirus R rate is projected to be above the feared level of one in the south-west and south-east of England.

Government scientists say the number of reproductions in the UK – the average number of people infected by every Covid-19 patient – is still between 0.7 and 0.9.

However, a team from Cambridge University estimates that it could be above one in two regions and is on the verge of reaching levels in all parts of the country except the Midlands.

It is important that this number remains below one, otherwise the outbreak of the coronavirus can quickly increase again if people infect others around them faster.

Scientists analyze numbers of deaths and cases, as well as data on how many people have antibodies and social interactions to make their predictions that flow into SAGE.

According to their model, the R rate is the highest in the South West (1.04) – home to the stay cation hotspots of Cornwall, Devon and Dorset. It is also estimated to be over one in the southeast (1.02).

In three other regions – Northwest, East and London – the rate of reproduction has increased, which experts say is not an accurate method of measuring an outbreak in minor cases.

Scientists accused the lifting of the blocking measures, reports the Daily Telegraph. Infectious disease scientists warned that an increase would be inevitable.

Figures show that England had the second highest national peak in mortality from the week ending February 21 to the week ending June 12, compared to 21 European countries, with only Spain peaking higher.

The peak of the surplus is the point at which the highest excess deaths were recorded in one place during the pandemic.

Of the four nations in the United Kingdom, England had the highest mortality rate at 107.6 percent per week until April 17.

In comparison, the highest peak was in Wales the same week at 67.5 percent, in Scotland the previous week at 71.7 percent and in Northern Ireland at 48.2 percent the week of April 24th.

Spain had the highest national mortality rate at 138.5 a week until April 3.

In terms of major cities, the highest mortality rate in Madrid was highest in the week of March 27, at 432.7 percent.

In Great Britain, Birmingham had the highest mortality rate of all British cities in the week to April 17, at 249.7 percent. The city of Midlands struggled with some of the highest hospitalizations for Covid-19 in Europe.

This was followed by London (226.7 percent in the week of April 17) and Manchester (198.4 percent in the same week).

Edinburgh, Glasgow, Cardiff and Belfast, the other British cities analyzed, did not do so badly, but still suffered significant deaths and peaked at 98, 109.7, 140.7 and 63.9, respectively.

At the municipal level, the excessive deaths varied between and within countries in the first half of 2020.

The first eleven authorities with the highest surplus peaks were all in Italy and Spain in March, when the two countries were hit hardest by the Covid 19 pandemic.

Bergamo, the city most affected by the epidemic, not only in Lombardy but also throughout Italy, saw an 847.7 percent increase in deaths in the week ending March 20.

At the peak of their respective epidemics, the following had the second, third and fourth highest rates: Cremona (Italy) with 617.7 percent; Segovia (Spain) with 600.6 percent; and Ciudad Real (Spain) with 532.3 percent.

Modeling at the University of Cambridge suggests that the R rate (left) has barely changed in London and is now 0.92 after falling below 0.5 after the block was introduced. The team also believes that cases (on the right) are declining and don't have to go up in the capital yet. The first blue line is March 23 when the block was introduced. The second blue line is May 11th, when the government released its Covid 19 recovery strategy. The red line is July 24th, the last day of modeling

The Coronavirus R rate in the Midlands (left) is much lower than in June, according to the Cambridge team. The cases (right) are also still declining, but much slower than before

The R rate in the east of England (left) is now 0.88, but has hardly changed in July. The number of daily cases (right) continues to decline, according to the scientists

However, the R rate appears to have risen above one in the southeast (right), and cases (right) are beginning to increase – from an estimated 669 infections on July 6 to 758 on July 24

It is also estimated that the R rate (left) in the southwest, the region of Devon, Cornwall and Dorset, has risen to over one. The team estimated there were 160 new infections in the region on July 24, compared to 136 on July 4

ARE CASES IN THE UK ON THE WAY?

Coronavirus cases in the UK have been on the rise for a fortnight – but deaths have barely changed and hospitalizations remain unchanged, according to official sources.

Ministry of Health statistics show that an average of 726 people test positive for the life-threatening virus daily. It's 33 percent higher than the 546 average exactly three weeks ago, the lowest since before the ban.

However, the number of Britons diagnosed with Covid-19 is much lower than on the darkest days of the April outbreak.

Around 5,000 positive tests were recorded daily during the height of the crisis, but this should be a massive underestimation due to the lack of tests. In April, fewer than 20,000 people were dabbed every day because of the virus. In the meantime, more than 100,000 tests are processed every day.

The number of coronavirus deaths has hardly changed in the past 10 days. The seven-day moving average is currently 66. For comparison: on Tuesday it was 65 and last Wednesday 64.

It can take weeks for infected patients to die from the coronavirus, which means that an increase in the last 14 days may not start until next week.

Hospital admissions – another indication of an outbreak that occurs before death – have hardly changed in the past week. Less than 100 people are accepted in England every day.

However, scientists from King & # 39; s College London believe that cases may still be on the rise. Data from a symptom tracking app that the team runs estimates that 2,110 people in the UK are infected with the virus every day, up from 1,884 in the past week. But the scientists believe the outbreak is stable.

The test numbers do not show the actual number of people infected because many people are infected with the virus, but never test positive for it, either because they do not recognize that they are sick, because they could not get a test, or because their result was wrong.

The top 20 areas include four areas in the UK, three in London and one in Essex in the south east of England. These were Brent (357.5 percent), Enfield (327.5 percent), Ealing (318 percent) and Thurrock (286.1 percent).

ONS found that West Kent in southeast England had an “abnormal value” of 53.5 percent.

Many London boroughs had more than 30 percent more deaths, including Wandsworth, Ealing, Brent, Westminster, Lambeth and Bexley.

Fears of a recurrence of infections arise when scientists found that the coronavirus R rate in the south-west and south-east of England is above the feared level of 1.

Government scientists say the number of reproductions in the UK – the average number of people infected by every Covid-19 patient – is still between 0.7 and 0.9.

However, a team from Cambridge University estimates that it could be above one in two regions and is on the verge of reaching levels in all parts of the country except the Midlands.

It is important that this number remains below one, otherwise the outbreak of the coronavirus can quickly increase again if people infect others around them faster.

Scientists analyze numbers of deaths and cases, as well as data on how many people have antibodies and social interactions to make their predictions that flow into SAGE.

According to their model, the R rate is the highest in the South West (1.04) – home to the stay cation hotspots of Cornwall, Devon and Dorset. It is also estimated to be over one in the southeast (1.02).

In three other regions – Northwest, East and London – the rate of reproduction has increased, which experts say is not an accurate method of measuring an outbreak in minor cases.

Scientists accused the lifting of the blocking measures, reports the Daily Telegraph.

Infectious disease scientists warned that an increase would be inevitable.

Two top scientists said today that the ban on travel abroad would eliminate Covid-19 and give Britain the "best chance" to fulfill Boris Johnson's promise to return to normal life by Christmas.

Epidemiologists Professor David Hunter and Professor Neil Pearce believe the virus can be wiped out, but ministers would need to change course.

In a commentary in The Guardian, the couple said today, “It doesn't make any epidemiological sense to go abroad in the middle of a pandemic.

STOP THE FOREIGN JOURNEY TO ELIMINATE COVID-19, SCIENTISTS SAY

The ban on travel abroad could eliminate Covid-19 and give Britain the "best chance" to fulfill Boris Johnson's promise to return to normal life by Christmas, top scientists have said.

Epidemiologists Professor David Hunter from Oxford University and Professor Neil Pearce from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine believe that the virus can be wiped out, but ministers would need to change course.

In a commentary in The Guardian, the couple said today, “It doesn't make any epidemiological sense to go abroad in the middle of a pandemic. With every incoming visitor from overseas or returning vacationers, the risk of bringing Covid-19 into the country increases.

& # 39; The government has so far justified allowing this trip because it believes that Community transmission of the virus in the UK is inevitable until a vaccine arrives. It is not. & # 39;

In a call to action this week, Scotland's first minister Nicola Sturgeon asked the UK to work together to "eliminate" the corona virus instead of "letting it float". The independent SAGE group, led by ex-UK scientific director Sir David King, has also supported calls for a "Zero Covid UK".

However, leading scientists have warned that the goal cannot be achieved. The government's chief scientific adviser, Sir Patrick Vallance, told MPs last month that it would take "another few years."

& # 39; With every incoming visitor from overseas or returning vacationers, the risk of bringing Covid-19 into the country increases.

& # 39; The government has so far justified allowing this trip because it believes that Community transmission of the virus in the UK is inevitable until a vaccine arrives. It is not. & # 39;

Professor Hunter from Oxford University and Professor Pearce from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine added: “If we want to avoid a“ November nightmare ”and want a relatively“ normal ”Christmas, an elimination boost gives us the best chance.

Can an elimination be achieved? We believe this is the case – although this would require major changes in the UK government's current thinking. & # 39;

Younger people could be at higher risk of developing coronavirus if the predicted second wave hits Britain this winter. This has also been claimed today.

The President of the Royal Society of Medicine warned that the second wave "is almost certain to come this winter" and could be very different from the first.

Professor Roger Kirby's warning comes when Boris Johnson revealed that a second wave could start in just two weeks.

Retired surgeon Professor Kirby said this morning on BBC Radio 4: “Winter is coming and almost certainly a second wave of this virus is coming.

"What we saw in 1918 was the virus change, and the second wave was different from the first wave and affected a different group of people – especially younger people."

His theory is based on a similar series of events that took place during the Spanish flu epidemic in the early 20th century and killed 50 million people worldwide.

It broke out in March 1918 and mainly affected the elderly and sick people during the First World War.

The pandemic seemed to end in August 1918, but mortality rates rose again between September and November.

However, the virus had developed into a new strain that could affect young and healthy people.

Experts now fear that the coronavirus could see a "W curve" similar to that of the Spanish flu – which means that there would be three major deaths.

DISCOVERED: THE COUNTRIES THAT HAVE THE HIGHEST OVERALL SURVIVES IN WEEK 22 THAT ENDED MAY 29TH
country Above average deaths in% aged 0 to 64 years country Above average deaths above average in% from 65 years
England 5.65 England 7.88
Scotland 3.42 Spain 7.34
Spain 2.63 Scotland 5.45
Wales 1.82 Belgium 5.19
Northern Ireland 0.63 Wales 2.97
Estonia -0.55 Sweden 2.92
France -1.39 Netherlands 2.75
Netherlands -1.56 Northern Ireland 2.29
Portugal -1.58 France 0.49
Iceland -1.74 Iceland -0.18
Austria -2 Austria -0.52
Sweden -2.61 Portugal -0.79
Bulgaria -2.78 Switzerland -1.67
Finland -3.07 Finland -2.16
Belgium -3.12 Luxembourg -2.21
Luxembourg -3.57 Denmark -2.37
Norway -3.57 Norway -2.56
Switzerland -3.91 Liechtenstein -3.67
Hungary -4.36 Estonia -4.09
Lithuania -4.81 Bulgaria -4.18
Slovakia -5.12 Hungary -4.23
Denmark -6.37 Slovakia -4.95
Liechtenstein -16.52 Lithuania -5
WHICH 20 LOCAL AUTHORITIES HAVE THE HIGHEST LEADERS IN EXCESSIVE DEATHS?
local community country Weekend (week) Above average deaths above average
Bergamo Italy March 20 (12) 847.7
Cremona Italy March 20 (12) 617.7
Segovia Spain March 27 (13) 600.6
Ciudad Real Spain March 27 (13) 532.3
Brescia Italy March 27 (13) 474.2
Piacenza Italy March 20 (12) 459.4
Lodi Italy March 13 (11) 449.4
Guadalajara Spain April 3 (14) 447.6
Albacete Spain April 3 (14) 445.2
Madrid Spain March 27 (13) 432.7
Soria Spain March 27 (13) 409.5
Brent (Greater London) United Kingdom April 17 (16) 357,5
Salamanca Spanien 3. April (14) 353.7
Enfield (Großraum London) Vereinigtes Königreich 24. April (17) 327,5
Parma Italy 20. März (12) 321.8
Ealing (Großraum London) Vereinigtes Königreich 17. April (16) 318
Lecco Italy 27. März (13) 306.6
Cuenca Spanien 3. April (14) 300,2
Thurrock (Essex) Vereinigtes Königreich 17. April (16) 286.1
Barcelona Spanien 3. April (14) 285,9

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