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Eight West African giraffes transported 500 miles to preserve the rare species


A wildlife photographer shared the conservationists' incredible efforts to preserve an endangered giraffe species.

Sean Viljoen created a short video documenting how a group of wild West African giraffes were transported 500 miles through Niger, the country's first relocation.

Conservationists were planning to set up satellite populations of the animals, of which only 600 are left in the wild if something goes wrong with the group living in the Kouré region.

Eight West African giraffes were transported 500 miles from the Kouré region in Niger to the Gadabedji Biosphere Reserve near the Nigerian capital Niamey

The Nigerian government and conservationists have joined forces to create a satellite population of the animals, of which only 600 are left in the wild if something goes wrong with the group living in the Kouré region

The Nigerian government and conservationists have joined forces to create a satellite population of the animals, of which only 600 are left in the wild if something goes wrong with the group living in the Kouré region

Catching the wild animals was a big task and required careful planning. A huge team of people from all over the world came together to help the species

Catching the wild animals was a big task and required careful planning. A huge team of people from all over the world came together to help the species

Eight of the endangered species that the country had shared with humans were individually selected by age and gender to be moved to a different location.

It took more than two days to catch and transport the animals, which were up to six meters tall, and a huge team of people from all over the world had to turn every giraffe into a roofless “chariot”.

In the amazing footage, several vehicles drive through the Kouré region to find the animals, and a wildlife veterinarian gets out of one of the cars, calmly approaches them, and shoots an arrow at one to calm it down.

The men follow the tower of the giraffes as they run away and quickly pull down the shot animal with ropes and give it an antidote.

The eight giraffes, which can be up to six meters high, were transported in groups of four to their new home in open cars

The eight giraffes, which can be up to six meters high, were transported in groups of four to their new home in open cars

A wildlife veterinarian fired an arrow at the giraffe, and a group of people followed close behind in cars waiting for it to take effect

A wildlife veterinarian fired an arrow at the giraffe, and a group of people followed close behind in cars waiting for it to take effect

While the animals were sedated, conservationists took blood samples, performed medical tests and measured them

While the animals were sedated, conservationists took blood samples, performed medical tests and measured them

With a hood and attached to ropes, the giraffes were maneuvered onto the back of a trailer to be brought to an enclosure with the other animals

With a hood and attached to ropes, the giraffes were maneuvered onto the back of a trailer to be brought to an enclosure with the other animals

The astonishing footage shows the men starting at the animal's neck and pulling it to the ground to do blood tests, check for diseases and take its measurements.

The giraffe wears a hood over his head and is led into the back of a trailer and kept in a pen with the other seven animals for three weeks.

After they get used to each other, they are taken 500 miles in two groups of four in a trailer to the Gadabedji Biosphere Reserve near the Nigerian capital Niamey.

Each trip lasted more than 48 hours and the project was implemented by the Nigerian government with the support of the Giraffe Conservation Foundation (GCF).

The team consisted of the GCF team, additional experts from southern Africa and the United States who assisted in giraffe detection, including an experienced veterinarian and a giraffe detection team.

All eight giraffes have now been successfully relocated and are enjoying their time in their new reserve.

The giraffes stayed in the barn for three weeks before being taken to their new home in Gadabedji Biosphere Reserve

The giraffes stayed in the barn for three weeks before being taken to their new home in Gadabedji Biosphere Reserve

The conservation team consisted of the GCF team, additional experts from southern Africa and the United States who helped identify the giraffes, including an experienced veterinarian and a giraffe detection team

The conservation team consisted of the GCF team, additional experts from southern Africa and the United States who helped identify the giraffes, including an experienced veterinarian and a giraffe detection team

Stephanie Fennessy, co-founder and co-director of the GCF, said: “Almost 50 years ago, the giraffe in the Gadabedji region died out locally due to drought and illegal hunting.

& # 39; The reintroduction of the giraffe will further enrich the biodiversity of the reserve and help improve community development and support in the region.

& # 39; Eight giraffes have been successfully released from Gadebadji Biosphere Reserve, and the continued monitoring of the giraffe by GCF with members of the local community shows that the giraffe is doing well.

& # 39; The number of giraffes in Africa has decreased by about 30% in the past three decades.

“There are only around 111,000 giraffes left in Africa. that's one giraffe per four elephants.

"The relocation was very exciting and people are happy that the giraffe is returning to their area."

The move took more than 48 hours, with each trip taking only four of the eight giraffes to the new location 500 miles away

The move took more than 48 hours, with each trip taking only four of the eight giraffes to the new location 500 miles away

A convoy of vehicles followed behind the truck and made the two-day trip through Niger for a conservation project

A convoy of vehicles followed behind the truck and made the two-day trip through Niger for a conservation project

All eight giraffes have now been successfully relocated and are enjoying their time in their new reserve

All eight giraffes have now been successfully relocated and are enjoying their time in their new reserve

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