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Education Secretary Gavin Williamson says students can opt for grades received on their mock exams


students received a "triple lock" on their A-Level and GCSE grades last night when ministers ripped open the system following the Scottish exams fiasco.

Just 36 hours before the A-level results were released, Education Secretary Gavin Williamson said students could now opt for the grades they got on their mock exams.

This means that A-level students can choose between the grades they will receive tomorrow – based on assessments from teachers and a computer-generated standardization model – or their mock scores.

If they're not happy with either, they can take the exam in the fall, with the government paying for the schools.

High school graduates who receive their results tomorrow can now choose the grades they received in their mock exams. (Picture from a picture agency)

Mr. Williamson was forced to offer the unprecedented "Triple Lock" that will also apply to GCSE students after Nicola Sturgeon flipped Scotland's exam scores.

Last week Scottish high school students received their computerized grades on a similar system to the rest of the UK.

However, 125,000 results – roughly one in four – were downgraded by teachers' predictions, creating an outcry and complaint that disadvantaged students were the hardest hit.

Yesterday the Scottish government took a humiliating U-turn, saying that despite concerns over class inflation, all results would now fall back on the results that teachers had predicted.

Government ministers are believed to be nervous about a similar dispute in England when the A-level results are released tomorrow.

Education Secretary Gavin Williamson was forced to offer an unprecedented “triple lock” after the Scottish exams fiasco

Education Secretary Gavin Williamson was forced to offer an unprecedented “triple lock” after the Scottish exams fiasco

This week, Prime Minister Boris Johnson (pictured while visiting St. Joseph & # 39; s Catholic School in Upminster, London) insisted that the country had a "moral duty" to reopen schools next month

This week, Prime Minister Boris Johnson (pictured while visiting St. Joseph & # 39; s Catholic School in Upminster, London) insisted that the country had a "moral duty" to reopen schools next month

Prime Minister Boris Johnson during a visit to the Hereford County Hospital construction site in Herefordshire

Prime Minister Boris Johnson during a visit to the Hereford County Hospital construction site in Herefordshire

Home students remain in suspense

Home school children have to put their lives on hold because they were "forgotten" during the lockdown, a senior Tory MP warned yesterday.

Students studying privately for high school graduation and GCSE will miss grades this week after exams are canceled due to the coronavirus outbreak.

They may be able to take papers in the fall, but this will be too late for university and sixth grade college applications.

Unlike students in schools and colleges, they did not have teachers who could present "graded grades" to examination boards.

Tory MP Robert Halfon, chairman of the education committee, said: “It looks pretty bleak for these kids. It just seems that these kids were forgotten during the lockdown. & # 39;

Hannah Titley of the Home Schooling Association said private candidates were "unfairly disadvantaged."

The number of house students rose by 15 percent last year – from 52,770 to 60,544 within 12 months.

Mr Williamson said England would not allow teachers' predicted grades to persist as it would result in unacceptable year-over-year class inflation.

He insisted that his new system would ensure students get the "fairest results" after summer exams were canceled due to the pandemic.

The last minute change will lead to further allegations that the government failed to get a grip on yet another aspect of the crisis after a failure in nursing homes, schools, testing, travel and the provision of PPE to NHS workers.

Mr. Williamson said: “Every young person waiting for results wants to know that they have been treated fairly.

"By making sure students have the safety net of their bogus scores as well as the opportunity to take fall exams, we're creating a triple-lock process to ensure they have the confidence to move forward with the next steps in work or education."

Schools are required to demonstrate to Examination Inspectors Ofqual that mocking was performed under exam-like conditions, but the process is expected to be streamlined significantly.

The government announced it would allocate £ 30million to finance fall exams for all schools to relieve budgets already spent on treating coronavirus measures.

"The SNP failed the test, but we have made further revisions," said a government source.

& # 39; That decision in Scotland was a bad one. That means there are now students in Scotland walking around with puffed-up grades that no one will take seriously.

“It's not fair for students this year, and it's not fair for last year students. Our system is fundamentally fairer. & # 39;

In Scotland the system became outraged, resulting in disadvantaged students being treated more than twice as harshly as the best.

Study to be a nurse, NHS tells students

Students who fail the grade are specifically encouraged by NHS chiefs to address the shortage of nursing.

Health bosses want to capitalize on the record number of students expected to go through clearing by offering more places for nursing degrees.

You will send direct emails to 50,000 people and run ads on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter and Snapchat. This appeals to those who enter the clearing system to apply for nursing courses.

Officials hope the stability of NHS careers will appeal to the "Covid generation" – those who are likely to suffer the long-term consequences of the pandemic.

The number of applications for nursing courses has already risen by 16 percent this year to over 47,000 by the end of June. Much of the increase can be attributed to the leadership role nurses have played in the country's response to the coronavirus.

Top UK nurse Ruth May said the We Are The NHS campaign aims to capitalize on the facility's growing popularity by reaching out to the next generation of health workers.

The SNP Education Minister John Swinney was fighting for his political career yesterday and said the standardization was being wound up.

& # 39; We wanted to make sure the system was fair. We wanted to make sure it was believable. But we didn't get it right for all young people, ”he said.

Just a few days earlier, Mr. Swinney had justified the examination procedure by stating that without this procedure the top marks would have risen by up to 14 percent.

Yesterday's decision means that inflation will happen – and raises questions about how next year's students will be treated and whether last year's students will protest.

Nick Hillman, director of the Institute for Higher Education Policy, said, “They chose the most generous option they could have chosen.

“However, the decision raises a whole series of questions about whether other exams were fair – for those who took exams last year and those who will take exams next year.

Anyone who believes that this announcement will remove all injustice is simply wrong. In fact, it has introduced new injustices to other people. & # 39;

Despite concerns, government critics lined up to demand a similar U-turn in England.

Union leader Sir Keir Starmer said the government risked "robbing a generation of young people of their futures" unless the rating system in England is also abandoned.

National Union of Students President Larissa Kennedy agreed that "the British government should follow Scotland's example by scrapping moderated notes".

Geoff Barton, chairman of the Association of School and College Leaders, said Scotland is now "out of whack with the rest of the UK where standardization is applied".

The U-turn fiasco by the Scottish Government gives students teacher-predicted exam grades – now pressure is mounting on Boris to do the same in England and Wales

By David Wilcock, Whitehall Correspondent for MailOnline

Tens of thousands of Scottish students are receiving exam scores based on their predicted grades after Nicola Sturgeon's Scottish government made an embarrassing U-turn this afternoon.

Your SNP administration bowed to political pressure to change course via a "standardization" system to counteract the fact that no exams were taken due to the coronavirus.

The process was deemed “unfair” by parents and teachers after downgrading success rates for students in the most deprived areas by 15.2 percent compared with 6.9 percent for students with the wealthiest backgrounds.

Scottish Education Secretary John Swinney told the MSPs in Holyrood this afternoon that more than 124,000 exam scores that have been downgraded through a controversial moderation process will return to grades valued by students' teachers, and urged the SNP government to engage in an investigation of the fiasco.

The U-turn will put more pressure on Boris Johnson. A standardization system is planned for the A-Level results, which are to be published on Thursday.

He is already under pressure to abandon the system and return to the predicted grades – leading to fears of widespread inflation.

Due to the changes announced by Mr. Swinney this afternoon, the new higher success rate for 2020 is 89.2 percent and thus 14.4 percent higher than in the previous year.

The national 5 pass rate is also up 10.7 percent to 88.9 percent, and the advanced higher pass rate is up to 93.1 percent – an increase of 13.7 percent.

Speaking to the MSPs this afternoon, Mr. Swinney said, “We wanted to make sure the system was fair. We wanted to make sure it was believable. But we didn't get it right for all young people.

“Before I go any further, I would like to apologize.

"When I speak directly to the young people affected by the awards downgrade – the 75,000 students whose teacher ratings were higher than their final award – I want to say this: I'm sorry."

Scottish Education Secretary John Swinney told the MSPs in Holyrood this afternoon that more than 124,000 exam scores that have been downgraded through a controversial moderation process will return to grades valued by students' teachers, and urged the SNP government to engage in an investigation of the fiasco

Scottish Education Secretary John Swinney told the MSPs in Holyrood this afternoon that more than 124,000 exam scores that have been downgraded through a controversial moderation process will return to grades valued by students' teachers, and urged the SNP government to engage in an investigation of the fiasco

Ms. Sturgeon admitted that the Scottish government “did not get it right” and complained that children were being punished in order to conform to a model of what the overall results should be

Thousands of English 18-year-olds are said to receive their results on Thursday despite not taking exams with a standardization system due to a coronavirus

Thousands of English 18-year-olds are said to receive their results on Thursday despite not taking exams with a standardization system due to a coronavirus

Former Ofsted boss Michael Wilshaw told Sky News: "I am concerned and I suspect many other people will be very concerned that we are not seeing a replication of what happened in Scotland."

Former Ofsted boss Michael Wilshaw told Sky News: "I am concerned and I suspect many other people will be very concerned that we are not seeing a replication of what happened in Scotland."

Geoff Barton, general secretary of the ASCL union, said: “There are good reasons for standardization as it means that this year's grades will be roughly the same as other years in order for students to be fair over time.

How are exams assessed and what does that mean for university places?

What could go wrong with the results?

To prevent this year's results from being viewed as worthless, both England and Scotland have tried to move their estimated teachers' grades down to reflect trends from previous years.

In Scotland, this resulted in repeating the “achievement gap” between the richest and poorest, with the “most disadvantaged” students dropping grades by 15.2 percent but the richest only by 6.9 percent.

This hit the most talented students worst in poor performing schools, meaning those who expected top grades were dragged down on school records.

The outrage over the situation has led to an about-face being announced today.

How will vocations work in England?

Students will not be able to question the grades set by their teachers. Appeals must be submitted by schools – not students.

You are likely to be successful when a school's past performance is unlikely to be a useful measure of predictions.

Most importantly, appeals are now allowed when "students with unusually high or low skills are (affected) because they are outside the outcome pattern".

Schools need to provide evidence and there are concerns about how long the process could take.

What if vocations fail?

Students who are told there is insufficient evidence to appeal or who are rejected will only have the option to resign in the fall. You can use the higher of the two classes. In cases where students suspect racism or bias behind teachers' decisions, their only option is to file a complaint instead of using the appeal process.

What about students hoping to go to university this year?

The Education Minister said universities should "do everything possible to ensure that students can achieve higher education".

Those students who miss an offer must be willing to contact the university of their choice and explain why they think they should be admitted despite their grades as they wait for complaints to be handled.

If students need to take a retake, it may be possible for them to start their university courses in the New Year after taking exams in the fall and getting results before Christmas.

"However, there is clearly a tension if this leads to a situation where good faith schools and colleges are pulling down grades based on a statistical model, especially if it adversely affects disadvantaged students."

He added: "The decision in Scotland will put pressure on authorities in the rest of the home country to follow suit and we will have to see how that works out."

Former Ofsted boss Michael Wilshaw previously told Sky News: “I am concerned and I suspect many other people will be very concerned that we are not seeing a replication of what happened in Scotland, what a large number of downgrades and a has shown a disproportionately high number of demotions among young people from poor backgrounds in some of the most disadvantaged schools.

“That can't be happening here and I hope Ofqual, the exam systems supervisors in England, are aware of the dangers and will take remedial action if this occurs.

“What has happened in Scotland, and can happen here in England and Wales, is that there has been an imbalance in judgments between the school's performance and its exam history, taking into account the performance of each student.

"If that's an imbalance, and you get that balance wrong, things are going to go bad."

The methodology used by the Scottish Qualifications Authority (SQA) was that the grades downgraded by teachers based on criteria included the school's historical performance.

This led to criticism that high-performing students were wrongly punished by schools with historically poor results.

Mr Swinney's Tory shadow, Jamie Greene, had previously said: “It is clear that the only way forward is to have a full parliamentary investigation into the audit results scandal.

"This has been one of the SNP government's biggest failures, and the people deserve answers."

Ucas executive director Clare Marchant weighed in that afternoon, saying she expected universities with near-miss candidates who lost a grade or two in England to be "super flexible."

Sir Michael said that there would always be students in schools with poor performers who would stand up to the odds and perform well, but Ofqual should make sure they "study" and "dig deeply" into the results of each school. Change marks.

“Young people and their families should have the right to appeal … parents should have that right. And that right doesn't exist at the moment, and I hope that the government and the DfE will change this problem, ”he said.

Sir Michael said, "I know it will be expensive and it could be a long and arduous process, but we are talking about children's lives and their future here."

He added, "We have put so much money into the vacation program that we should spend a little more getting it right."

Schools were asked to submit the grades they believed the students would have received if they passed the exams. Examination boards have moderated these grades to ensure that this year's scores are not significantly higher than in previous years and that the value of student grades is not undermined.

Unis urges to be "super flexible" with downgrades

The Ucas director said she expected universities with near-miss candidates who lost a grade or two in England to be “super flexible”.

Executive director Clare Marchants said she expected higher education institutions to be "more flexible than ever" when standardization takes place.

However, she also warned that in the fall, students should be careful if they are dissatisfied with their grades, as there will be a “narrower” selection of university courses.

“I don't think we students should be joking that there are as many choices in January as there is for a fall start at a university. There's a much narrower choice, ”Ms. Marchant said in a webinar for the Higher Education Policy Institute (Hepi).

"When you have a result and can move on, move on," she said.

On the fall exams, Ms. Marchant added, “It will be right for some students, but they really need to realize that there is no way for them to get into college without doing this.

"I think for the vast majority they will either get what they want, or they will top it, or they will have a near-miss. In that case, talking to the university is paramount."

Last month, Ofqual said that this summer's A-Level scores would have been 12 percentage points better than last year if the grades for assessing teachers hadn't been standardized.

Liberal Democrat education spokeswoman Layla Moran said: “Ministers need to learn from the chaos of results in Scotland. We don't want more young people to be wrongly punished by Covid-19 allocation systems.

“To prevent this from happening, the government must make it clear that individual students can dispute their grade prices directly with Ofqual for free, and take these exams for free if it is safe to do so, if they so wish. & # 39;

Ms. Marchant warned students not to take exams in the fall if they are dissatisfied with their A-level grades, as the choice of university courses will be "narrower".

She advised students to continue with the grades they received this week if they still allow them to enter higher education.

She said only a limited number of universities will offer courses starting in January for students taking exams in the fall.

“I don't think we students should be joking that there are as many choices in January as there is for a fall start at a university. There is a much closer choice, ”said Mrs. Marchant.

In a webinar by the Higher Education Policy Institute (Hepi), the Ucas boss urged caution because he was rushing to take an exam instead of accepting a place at university or getting good results.

"When you have a result and can move on, move on," she said.

On the fall exams, Ms. Marchant added, “It will be right for some students, but they really need to realize that there is no way for them to get into college without doing this.

"I think for the vast majority they will either get what they want, or they will top it, or they will have a near-miss. In that case, talking to the university is paramount."

The rethinking has raised concerns that England may experience a similar turmoil on GCSE and A-Level results.

Boris Johnson said yesterday he understands the "fear" caused by replacing exams with ratings after they were effectively erased by the coronavirus.

However, the Prime Minister's official spokesman said the agreements were "fair to all students".

Ms. Sturgeon was attacked from all quarters today after presiding over an exam result that sparked an embarrassing U-turn on live television.

The First Minister apologized for "standardization" errors that lowered grades for 125,000 Scottish students.

John Swinney

Jamie Greene

Scottish Education Minister John Swinney (left) will announce how he plans to fix the issues this afternoon. His Tory shadow Jamie Greene (right) said, "It's clear the only way forward is to have a full parliamentary investigation into the exam results scandal."

The Prime Minister visits Hereford County Hospital today as he announces that £ 300 million will be poured into hospitals to protect their facilities against Covid

The Prime Minister visits Hereford County Hospital today as he announces that £ 300 million will be poured into hospitals to protect their facilities against Covid

Staff speak to the Prime Minister during his visit to Hereford County Hospital today

Staff speak to the Prime Minister during his visit to Hereford County Hospital today

The First Minister admitted that the Scottish Government "did not get it right" and complained that individual children were being punished in order to conform to a model of what the overall results should be.

How are grades calculated if no exams have been taken this summer?

After that summer's exams were canceled, teachers were told to hand in the grades they believed any student would have received if they had passed the papers.

The predictions were sent to the examination boards along with a ranking that students believed would do best in each class for each subject.

Examination boards have moderated these school-assessed grades to ensure that this year's scores are not significantly higher than in previous years and that the value of student grades is not undermined.

As part of the standardization process, exam boards have also considered historical performance data to determine the percentage of students who have reached each grade over the past few years.

Individual grades may have been adjusted up or down after the moderation. This means that the final grade awarded to a student may differ from that submitted by their school or college.

Both Labor and the Tories challenged the head of the SNP minister today, although the turnaround did little to quell widespread anger.

While the SQA was developing the methodology, the First Minister “dismissed” the relevant qualifications authority because it was done at the behest of the Scottish Ministers.

Visiting a school in London about the exams in England, Mr Johnson said: “Given what has happened this year, there is obviously some concern about what grades students will get and everyone understands the system that students get teachers if the grades determine, then there is a standardization system. & # 39;

The Prime Minister's spokesman said: “There is a standardization process, but if students are dissatisfied with their grade, they can appeal or take exams in the fall.

"We would expect the vast majority of students to get a calculated grade this summer that will allow them to move on to the next level of their education."

Scottish Labor will vote of no confidence in Mr Swinney in Holyrood and the Conservatives and say they will support it.

Labor Holyrood education spokesman Iain Gray told the Guardian, “It is frankly hypocritical for the prime minister to apologize today after refusing to accept an injustice for over a week.

'Diese Entschuldigung befasst sich mehr mit dem Schutz von John Swinneys Job als mit dem Versagen ihrer Regierung.

'Eine verspätete und erzwungene Entschuldigung ist nicht gut genug. Wir brauchen eine sofortige Rückkehr zu den von den Lehrern empfohlenen Noten für diejenigen, deren Noten reduziert wurden. Es ist Zeit, dass Schüler und Lehrer Gerechtigkeit erfahren und Swinney seine Notizen macht. & # 39;

Die Universitäten drängten darauf, Plätze für Herausforderer auf A-Level zu halten

Die Universitäten wurden aufgefordert, Plätze für Studenten zu besetzen, die ihre A-Level-Noten herausfordern, bis sie das Ergebnis der Berufung erhalten.

Die Universitätsministerin Michelle Donelan hat die Institutionen aufgefordert, „flexibel“ zu sein und eine Reihe von Belegen zu berücksichtigen, wenn sie auswählen, welche Studenten vor dem Abschlusstag zugelassen werden sollen.

Studenten, deren Noten nach einer erfolgreichen Berufung die Bedingungen für das Universitätsangebot erfüllen, können nicht auf die vorübergehende Kontrolle der Studentenzahlen durch die Regierung angerechnet werden, sagte Frau Donelan.

Es besteht die Befürchtung, dass Studenten ihre Universität erster Wahl verpassen könnten, wenn die Prüfungsausschüsse lange Zeit benötigen, um Beschwerden zu bearbeiten, nachdem die Prüfungen unter Covid-19 abgesagt wurden.

Frau Donelan sagte, dass sich die Leistungen einiger talentierter Schüler möglicherweise nicht in den Noten widerspiegeln – insbesondere in Schulen, die in der Vergangenheit keine guten Ergebnisse erzielt haben.

In einem Brief an die Vizekanzlerin vor dem Abschlusstag am Donnerstag sagte sie: „Wir erwarten, dass die überwiegende Mehrheit der Noten korrekt ist, aber es ist wichtig, dass wir dieses Sicherheitsnetz für junge Menschen haben, die sonst möglicherweise festgehalten werden zurück von der gewählten Route. & # 39;

Der Universitätsminister drängte: "Wenn Sie wissen, dass sich die Note eines Studenten aufgrund einer Berufung ändern kann, möchte ich Sie nach Möglichkeit ermutigen, ihren Platz zu behalten, bis sie das Ergebnis dieser Berufung erhalten."

Die Ucas-Frist für Bewerber, um ihre akademischen Angebotsbedingungen zu erfüllen, endet am 7. September. Damit haben die Prüfungsausschüsse weniger als vier Wochen Zeit, um die Ergebnisse der Beschwerden herauszugeben.

In dem Brief sagte Frau Donelan: „Ich weiß, dass die Prüfungsausschüsse verpflichtet sind, bis zu diesem Datum alles zu tun, um Berufungen für betroffene Kandidaten zu lösen. Bei allen anderen Kandidaten bemühen sich die Prüfungsausschüsse, innerhalb von 42 Kalendertagen und nach Möglichkeit früher zu antworten. & # 39;

(tagsToTranslate) Dailymail (t) Nachrichten (t) Gavin Williamson