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Dutch police officers laugh at the British truck driver when they confiscated his ham sandwiches


Dutch police officers were filmed laughing at a British truck driver as officers seized the man's ham sandwiches in accordance with post-Brexit import regulations.

"Welcome to Brexit, sir," says one of the officers mockingly in the video of the incident, while the driver asks, "Can you take the meat and leave me the bread?"

Footage from Dutch television showed border guards seizing sandwiches and other food from drivers entering the Netherlands from the UK.

The EU does not allow meat, meat products, milk or dairy products to be imported from outside the Union for “personal consumption”.

After the UK left the EU on January 1, the rules now apply to people crossing the Channel.

These rules do not apply to animal products that are transported between EU member states, while Andorra, Iceland, Liechtenstein, Norway, San Marino or Switzerland are also excluded.

Pictured: a film still image showing Dutch police officers seizing food from a UK truck driver. They hold up the man's fouled ham sandwiches and tell him the sandwiches must be confiscated because they contain ham

"Welcome to Brexit, sir," says one of the officers in the video of the incident when the driver asks, "Can you take the meat and leave me the bread?"

Dutch officials can be heard in the footage explaining the new post-Brexit rules for drivers entering the EU. These prohibit bringing in certain foods originating in the UK.

"Since Brexit, certain foods are no longer allowed to enter Europe," a border official at the Hook of Holland seaport told Dutch NPO television.

The footage shows officials rummaging around in people's vehicles, holding up any food they find in them. They say they must be confiscated.

When the driver, coming from the ferry from the UK, asks the officers if he can wrap the bread on his ham sandwiches in aluminum foil, the officers are heard saying, “No, everything will be confiscated – welcome to Brexit, sir. I'm sorry. & # 39;

The UK Government's guidance for drivers traveling to EU countries reads: “As of January 1, 2021, you will not be able to use POAO (products of animal origin) such as meat or dairy products (e.g. a ham and cheese sandwich) bring more the EU. & # 39;

In the picture: the driver's ham sandwiches wrapped in foil. Under the new rules imposed on Britain after it left the EU, meat and dairy products cannot be brought into the EU from the UK for personal consumption

Pictured: the driver's ham sandwiches wrapped in foil. Under the new rules imposed on Britain after it left the EU, meat and dairy products cannot be brought into the EU from the UK for personal consumption

When the driver asked the officers if he could only keep the bread from his aluminum foil wrapped ham sandwiches, the officer said, “No, everything will be confiscated - welcome to Brexit, sir. I'm sorry & # 39;

When the driver asked the officers if he could only keep the bread from his aluminum foil wrapped ham sandwiches, the officer said, “No, everything will be confiscated – welcome to Brexit, sir. I'm sorry & # 39;

Since the UK officially left the EU on January 1, 2021, more serious food supply problems have emerged. There are gaps in the fruit and vegetable shelves of supermarkets as there is a warning that supplies from ports in ports will be restricted by Brexit.

Lettuce, cauliflower boxes, oranges, strawberries, raspberries and blueberries are among the fresh products listed as "out of stock" on the Tesco website.

Several of the UK's leading food companies have highlighted the complexity of the rules of origin enshrined in the Brexit trade agreement.

This means that only goods made up of products originating in the UK are considered duty free. Steve Rowe, CEO of Marks & Spencer, said last week, "Duty Free doesn't feel duty free when you read the fine print."

Meanwhile, food industry experts and Brexit cabinet minister Michael Gove have warned that problems in the ports are likely to escalate from today

Meanwhile, food industry experts and Brexit cabinet minister Michael Gove have warned that problems in the ports are likely to escalate from today

Lettuce, packets of cauliflower, oranges, strawberries, raspberries and blueberries are listed as "out of stock" in some areas on the Tesco website. Pictured: Sainsbury & # 39; s has little fruit and vegetable in Haverhill, Suffolk

Lettuce, packets of cauliflower, oranges, strawberries, raspberries and blueberries are listed as "out of stock" in some areas on the Tesco website. Pictured: Sainsbury & # 39; s has little fruit and vegetable in Haverhill, Suffolk

Bringing food from the UK to the EU: what rules will apply after Brexit?

Since January 1, 2021 – when Great Britain officially left the EU – the rules for importing food from Great Britain into the EU have tightened.

The EU does not allow meat, meat products, milk and dairy products for personal consumption to be imported from outside the Union.

This now also applies to the UK post-Brexit, which means anyone crossing the canal will be confiscated if they fail to follow these rules.

There is an exemption for powdered baby milk, baby food and special feed or special feed for pets that are required for medical reasons if they weigh less than 2 kg and meet other criteria.

Plants and herbal products are now also subject to stricter measures.

The rules come from the foot and mouth disease endemic in the EU in 2001.

"It is known that dangerous pathogens that cause animal diseases such as foot-and-mouth disease and classic swine fever can occur in meat, milk or their products," says the EU guidelines.

"Therefore, pathogens could be introduced into the EU when personal goods containing meat, milk or their products are sent by post or carried in the luggage of travelers from countries outside the EU in which such pathogens may be in circulation."

A spokesman for the British Meat Processors Association said: "Ultimately, the rules are the rules (on animal origin) now that we are a third country in the EU."

But they added that the Dutch had little to worry about the standards of British products, saying, "Our status with pigs, sheep and cattle is very high."

Meanwhile, food industry experts and Brexit cabinet minister Michael Gove have warned that problems in the ports are likely to escalate from today.

The number of trucks traveling through Dover and the Channel Tunnel is expected to rise to normal levels after a New Year's break as the French step up enforcement of the papers after Brexit.

Freight Specialist John Shirley said, “The chaos has begun. Organizing the simplest cargo to Europe has become an almost impossible task due to the bureaucratic effort introduced on January 1st. & # 39;

The Road Haulage Association said there are already traffic jams and this situation will escalate if border controls with France are stepped up from today.

The group estimates that of the 2,000 outbound trucks a day through Dover and the Channel Tunnel, one in five were turned away in the past week.

It was said that the problems would worsen as those numbers climb to the normal 6,000 a day.

Politics general manager Rod McKenzie said, "Drivers are turned away for a variety of reasons, including because they don't have a valid Covid test. At the same time, they are told that the paperwork was not done satisfactorily.

"The French have had a relatively slight influence on enforcement so far, but not from Monday."

Mr. Gove admitted, "We expect significant additional disruptions in the coming weeks."

Immediate financial help might be needed to keep the difficult food exporters faced with the challenge of shipping products to the EU.

James Withers, executive director of Scotland Food and Drink, told The Independent that exporters are finding the "door to the EU now closed" for the EU and warned that British fish companies are in danger of collapse.

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