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Dutch customs officials posted a photo of MORE confiscated British food


Since the new Brexit rules came into force on January 1st, Dutch port officials have been showing off a stash of food confiscated from Brits who crossed the EU border after confiscating a "small mountain" of items.

Customs officers showed a pile of confiscated items, including a carton of juice, a box of oranges, a packet of cereal and a packet of Waitrose chicken breasts, when they warned, "You can't just bring food from the UK."

Officials at the Hook of Holland ferry terminal said the offensive items were destroyed in accordance with regulations that require a health certificate for food to be imported into the EU.

It came when border police took ham sandwiches from a truck driver and said "welcome to Brexit" in an incident that caused anger among Brexite MPs.

Dutch television reporter Floris Prenger said he and his crew saw a "little mountain" of food confiscated from arriving travelers while filming at the huge ferry terminal near Rotterdam, where trips from Harwich arrive in Essex several times a day .

"Maybe the people overlooked that during Brexit," he said, "but the customs officials wanted to get the message across that food in any form should not be brought into the EU from outside."

Dutch port officials showed a pile of confiscated items at the Hook of Holland ferry terminal, including a carton of juice, a box of oranges and a box of Waitrose chicken breasts. The headline reads: "Are you bringing food from the UK?"

One British citizen voiced concerns that the seizures in Hook of Holland meant that "all food in UK caravans and motorhomes is now illegal".

The Dutch authorities insisted that this was not the case, referring to the advice from the government that health certificates are available when needed and that some foods such as sweets and chocolate are not controlled.

However, the British criticized the strict application of the rules. One said, "I thought the Dutch had at least taken a grown-up stance on it."

There have even been complaints from some Dutch readers. First, Rinus Middelaar replied: “Don't you know what kind of crazy situation politics creates? Idiocy upstairs. We're talking about food waste. & # 39;

But Harry Kocheim, who is considered a Dutch customs officer, replied: “There is one thing you don't understand. We as customs officers have taken the oath. We MUST abide by the law … Britain wanted Brexit if necessary so complain to Boris Johnson, not Dutch Customs. & # 39;

Brexiteers criticized the Dutch border police for mocking a Polish truck driver who confiscated his sandwiches after arriving at the same port from the UK.

"Welcome to Brexit, sir," says one of the officers in the video of the incident, while the driver asks, "Can you take the meat and leave me the bread?"

The EU does not allow meat, meat products, milk or dairy products to be imported from outside the Union for “personal consumption”.

After the UK left the EU on January 1, the rules now apply to people crossing the Channel.

But the border official's strict stance on the newly imposed rules has been called "pathetic nit-picking" by a leading Brexiteer.

"The whole story literally smells like a sandwich just before a picnic," Andrew Bridgen MP told MailOnline.

“As the Dutch know, like everyone else in the EU, we have the highest food standards in Europe.

Pictured: a film still image showing Dutch police officers seizing food from a UK truck driver. They hold up the man's fouled ham sandwiches and tell him the sandwiches must be confiscated because they contain ham

Pictured: a film still image showing Dutch police officers seizing food from a UK truck driver. They hold up the man's fouled ham sandwiches and tell him the sandwiches must be confiscated because they contain ham

"Welcome to Brexit, sir," says one of the officers in the video of the incident when the driver asks, "Can you take the meat and leave me the bread?"

A well-known Eurosceptic, Mr Bridgen spent 22 years in the food industry before entering Parliament in 2010.

“Will it be the way it is then? Are they really walking through a truck driver's lunch box going through customs for something that poses a hazard?

“We have to talk to the European Union about which is really quite pathetic. Otherwise this will not be good for the Dutch ports, the freight forwarders will go elsewhere. & # 39;

Mark Francois, Chairman of the Tory Backbench European Research Group, said, “This is a pettifogging bureaucracy that has gone mad.

"The EU has always worried that a dynamic, freely tradable UK outside the EU might at some point have lunch in world markets. Now they are reciprocating by trying to steal lunch from our truckers instead!" It is really pathetic. & # 39;

Dutch customs confiscated dozens of sandwiches and meat packages from people arriving in Hook of Holland on the ferry from the UK

Dutch customs officials confiscate dozens of sandwiches and meat packages from people arriving on the ferry from the UK to Hook of Holland in the Netherlands

Mark Francois, chairman of Parliament's European Research Group, said: "This is a crazy bureaucracy that has gone crazy".

Mark Francois, chairman of Parliament's European Research Group, said: "This is a crazy bureaucracy that has gone crazy."

Dutch officials can be heard in the footage explaining the new post-Brexit rules for drivers entering the EU. These prohibit bringing in certain foods originating in the UK.

"Since Brexit, certain foods are no longer allowed to enter Europe," a border official at the Hook of Holland seaport told Dutch NPO television.

The footage shows officials rummaging around in people's vehicles, holding up any food they find in them. They say they must be confiscated.

When the driver, coming from the ferry from the UK, asks the officers if he can wrap the bread on his ham sandwiches in aluminum foil, the officers are heard saying, “No, everything will be confiscated – welcome to Brexit, sir. I'm sorry. & # 39;

The UK Government's guidance for drivers traveling to EU countries reads: “As of January 1, 2021, you will not be able to use POAO (products of animal origin) such as meat or dairy products (e.g. a ham and cheese sandwich) bring more the EU. & # 39;

Pictured: the driver's ham sandwiches wrapped in foil. Under the new rules imposed on Britain after it left the EU, meat and dairy products cannot be brought into the EU from the UK for personal consumption

Pictured: the driver's ham sandwiches wrapped in foil. Under the new rules that were imposed on the UK after it left the EU, meat and dairy products cannot be brought into the EU from the UK for personal consumption

When the driver asked the officers if he could only keep the bread from his aluminum foil wrapped ham sandwiches, the officer said, “No, everything will be confiscated - welcome to Brexit, sir. I'm sorry & # 39;

When the driver asked the officers if he could only keep the bread from his aluminum foil wrapped ham sandwiches, the officer said, “No, everything will be confiscated – welcome to Brexit, sir. I'm sorry & # 39;

More serious food supply problems have emerged since the UK left the EU entirely on January 1st. Gaps are appearing in the fruit and vegetable shelves of supermarkets and warnings that supplies will be restricted by the Brexit bureaucracy in ports.

Lettuce, cauliflower boxes, oranges, strawberries, raspberries and blueberries are among the fresh products listed as "out of stock" on the Tesco website.

Several of the UK's leading food companies have highlighted the complexity of the rules of origin enshrined in the Brexit trade agreement.

This means that only goods made up of products originating in the UK are considered duty free. Steve Rowe, CEO of Marks & Spencer, said last week, "Duty Free doesn't feel duty free when you read the fine print."

Meanwhile, food industry experts and Brexit cabinet minister Michael Gove have warned that problems in the ports are likely to escalate from today

Meanwhile, food industry experts and Brexit cabinet minister Michael Gove have warned that problems in the ports are likely to escalate from today

Lettuce, packets of cauliflower, oranges, strawberries, raspberries and blueberries are listed as "out of stock" in some areas on the Tesco website. Pictured: Sainsbury & # 39; s has little fruit and vegetable in Haverhill, Suffolk

Lettuce, packets of cauliflower, oranges, strawberries, raspberries and blueberries are listed as "out of stock" in some areas on the Tesco website. Pictured: Sainsbury & # 39; s has little fruit and vegetable in Haverhill, Suffolk

Bringing food from the UK to the EU: what rules will apply after Brexit?

Since January 1, 2021 – when Great Britain officially left the EU – the rules for importing food from Great Britain into the EU have tightened.

The EU does not allow meat, meat products, milk and dairy products for personal consumption to be imported from outside the Union.

This now also applies to the UK post-Brexit, which means anyone crossing the canal will be confiscated if they fail to follow these rules.

There is an exemption for powdered baby milk, baby food and special feed or special feed for pets that are required for medical reasons if they weigh less than 2 kg and meet other criteria.

Plants and herbal products are now also subject to stricter measures.

The rules come from the foot and mouth disease endemic in the EU in 2001.

"It is known that dangerous pathogens that cause animal diseases such as foot-and-mouth disease and classic swine fever can occur in meat, milk or their products," says the EU guidelines.

"Therefore, pathogens could be introduced into the EU when personal goods containing meat, milk or their products are sent by post or carried in the luggage of travelers from countries outside the EU in which such pathogens may be in circulation."

A spokesman for the British Meat Processors Association said: "Ultimately, the rules are the rules (on animal origin) now that we are a third country in the EU."

But they added that the Dutch had little to worry about the standards of British products, saying, "Our status with pigs, sheep and cattle is very high."

Meanwhile, food industry experts and Brexit cabinet minister Michael Gove have warned that problems in the ports are likely to escalate from today.

The number of trucks traveling through Dover and the Channel Tunnel is expected to rise to normal levels after a New Year's break as the French step up enforcement of the papers after Brexit.

Freight Specialist John Shirley said, “The chaos has begun. Organizing the simplest cargo to Europe has become an almost impossible task due to the bureaucratic effort introduced on January 1st. & # 39;

The Road Haulage Association said there are already traffic jams and this situation will escalate if border controls with France are stepped up from today.

The group estimates that of the 2,000 outbound trucks a day through Dover and the Channel Tunnel, one in five were turned away in the past week.

It was said that the problems would worsen as those numbers climb to the normal 6,000 a day.

Politics general manager Rod McKenzie said, "Drivers are turned away for a variety of reasons, including because they don't have a valid Covid test. At the same time, they are told that the paperwork was not done satisfactorily.

"The French have had a relatively slight influence on enforcement so far, but not from Monday."

Mr. Gove admitted, "We expect significant additional disruptions in the coming weeks."

Immediate financial help might be needed to keep the difficult food exporters faced with the challenge of shipping products to the EU.

James Withers, executive director of Scotland Food and Drink, told The Independent that exporters are finding the "door to the EU now closed" for the EU and warned that British fish companies are in danger of collapse.

Holland, a drug smuggler's paradise (but don't bring ham sandwiches!) While Dutch police officers focus on truckers' snacks, gangs are turning the country into a drug state with billions in illegal operations

Dutch port officials have made headlines for mocking a trucker for confiscating his ham sandwiches under Brexit rules – but criminals have the last laugh as they use the country's shipping terminals to sell billions of pounds worth of drugs every year smuggle.

The Netherlands is known to be tolerant of cannabis use and is also considered the "gateway to South American cocaine" and the "ideal environment" for a drug trade that has left the country for fear of becoming an "anesthetic state".

While more than 14,000 kg of cocaine are seized by the Dutch authorities each year, around 56,000 kg are believed to go undetected, making Holland one of the main drug trafficking centers in Europe.

Some of the lucrative stocks of cocaine, often hidden in fruit shipments, are worth more than £ 100 million alone and are sometimes smuggled along with firearms.

Criminal trafficking in Dutch ports has also started to penetrate the mainland. Gang violence caused an outcry in Amsterdam, in which drug queens operate money laundering thugs and a “ring of hustlers and parasites” has a “free hand”.

Busted: In a major drug attack last year, more than two tons of cocaine with an estimated street value of £ 136 million were found in a banana shipment in Rotterdam

Busted: In a major drug attack last year, more than two tons of cocaine with an estimated street value of £ 136 million were found in a banana shipment in Rotterdam

In a major drug bankruptcy last year, more than two tons of cocaine with an estimated street value of £ 136 million were found in a banana shipment in Rotterdam.

Arrived from Ecuador, the illegal drugs were supposed to use Holland as a gateway to Europe before they got to Hungary.

Rotterdam is Europe's largest seaport and annually transports almost 15 million containers, only a small part of which is routinely scanned.

Even when containers are inspected, gangs can use accomplices at Dutch and Belgian docks to sneak past authorities.

Last year police discovered that seven shipping containers had even been turned into prison cells and a “torture chamber” used by the criminal underworld.

It was believed that it should be used for kidnapping. In the "torture chamber" was a dentist's chair with straps for the prisoner's arms and legs.

Six people were arrested on suspicion of "preparing for kidnappings and hostage-taking" after the containers were discovered in a drug-related robbery near the Belgian border.

Pieter Tops, a professor at the Dutch Police Academy, said in October that Holland's tolerant penal system and its extensive transport links make it an "ideal environment for drug trafficking".

The professor said school children were sometimes offered € 500 to transport a package while farmers were approached to rent their land to drug gangs.

"The main problem is the enormous flow of money and its impact on our society," he told Dutch News.

A 2019 report by the EU Drugs Agency estimates that around 14,600 kg of cocaine are seized each year in the Netherlands. In a separate IMF report, a “seizure rate” of around 20 percent is given.

According to Tops, every kilogram of cocaine is worth around 50,000 euros, which means the entire trade is worth billions.

& # 39; Torture Chamber & # 39;: Last year, police discovered that seven shipping containers had even been turned into prison cells for use by the criminal underworld

& # 39; Torture Chamber & # 39;: Last year the police discovered that seven shipping containers had even been turned into prison cells for use by the criminal underworld

Shipping hub: The port of Rotterdam is the largest in Europe and transports almost 15 million containers annually. This makes it an attractive gateway for drug smugglers

Shipping hub: The port of Rotterdam is the largest in Europe and transports almost 15 million containers annually. This makes it an attractive gateway for drug smugglers

In Amsterdam, a report commissioned by city authorities in 2019 found that hard drugs had increased violence and corruption by "hustlers, parasites and blackmailers".

The Netherlands has a "soft drug tolerance" policy, which means that Amsterdam's "coffee shops" will not be prosecuted for selling marijuana.

"The separation of soft and hard drugs protects soft drug users from the criminal cycle involved in hard drug trafficking," says the government.

However, the report found that the same “tolerance” gradually expanded to tougher drugs, with up to 17 percent of the population using cocaine or heroin.

"Amsterdam has given free rein to a colorful crew of drug criminals, a ring of hustlers and parasites, middlemen and blackmailers, dubious notaries and real estate agents," the report said.

At the top of the criminal chain are wealthy organized crime bosses who may not be physically in Amsterdam, the report said.

At the bottom are "lackeys like scooter and taxi chauffeurs and even young messenger boys who want to embark on quite a career path: offering murder as a service".

The report also found evidence of money laundering systems and turf wars between drug dealers in Amsterdam.

In the Netherlands, around six percent of men aged 15 to 34 years and three percent of women in the same age group report using cocaine.

Cannabis made in Holland is also sold to other countries, while Dutch ports serve as a transit point for the transport of cocaine to other European countries.

The murder of a lawyer for a protected witness in a drug case in 2019 led the head of a Dutch police union to state that "we definitely have the characteristics of a drug state".

“We are certainly not Mexico. We don't have 14,400 murders. But if you look at the infrastructure, the big bucks organized crime makes, the parallel economy. Yes, we have a drug state, ”Jan Struijs told BBC News at the time.

The murdered lawyer Derk Wiersum was shot dead in the suburbs of Amsterdam by a man dressed in black who fled on foot and was probably no older than 20 years.

Dutch customs confiscated dozens of sandwiches and meat packages from people arriving in Hook of Holland on the ferry from the UK

Dutch Customs confiscated dozens of sandwiches and meat packages from people arriving in Hook of Holland by ferry from the UK

Wiersum represented a "super grass" witness in a drug case who had signed a contract with prosecutors to produce evidence against suspected underworld bosses.

Months later, another Dutch lawyer involved in several drug cases was shot across the border in Germany, although he was not seriously injured.

Hook of Holland, where the UK trucker had his ham sandwiches confiscated last week, was also the starting point for a 35kg cocaine run into the UK that was eventually revealed when the shipment arrived in Humberside.

Truck driver Hendrik van der Genugten was later imprisoned for 10 years after smuggling the drugs out of the Netherlands in 2019.

Police in Hook of Holland were able to get rid of offensive sandwiches faster under the new Brexit rules, leading to claims of “nit picking”.

"Welcome to Brexit, sir … I'm sorry," said one official as he grabbed the driver's foil-wrapped sandwiches.

The driver plaintively asks the Dutch customs officer whether he "can remove the meat and you can leave me the bread".

But the Dutch official replied: "No, everything will be confiscated."

"The whole story literally smells like a sandwich just before a picnic," Brexiteer MP Andrew Bridgen told MailOnline.

“As the Dutch know, like everyone else in the EU, we have the highest food standards in Europe.

“Will it be the way it is then? Are they really walking through a truck driver's lunch box going through customs for something that poses a hazard?

“We have to talk to the European Union about which is really quite pathetic. Otherwise this will not be good for the Dutch ports, the freight forwarders will go elsewhere. & # 39;

Mark Francois, Chairman of Parliament's European Research Group, said: “This is a pettifogging bureaucracy that has gone crazy.

"The EU has always worried that a dynamic, free-acting UK outside the EU might at some point have lunch in world markets. Now they are reciprocating by trying to steal lunch from our truckers instead!" It is really pathetic. & # 39;

The new post-Brexit rules state that bringing meat or dairy foods into the EU, including for personal use, is prohibited.

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