ENTERTAINMENT

"Don't Kill Grandma": Preston Teens Are Urged to Adhere to Social Distancing


Preston Council Chairs released a powerful "Don't kill Grandma" message to encourage teens to obey the rules after it was revealed that half of the new coronavirus cases in the newly-locked town are under 30.

Fear grows that “brave” young people are ignoring social distancing and mingling in large crowds, putting them at risk of contracting the virus.

Many of those who become infected may be asymptomatic and may not even realize that they will then pass it on to loved ones when they return home.

It comes as the Local Government Association is calling for councils to be given more powers to shut down illegal pubs across the country as revelers packed into venues across the country last night.

Of particular concern is the problem in Preston, which was locked on site overnight, where half of the 61 new cases were found in those under 30.

The rate of new cases of Covid-19 per 100,000 residents in Preston has increased from 21.7 in the seven days ending July 28 to 42.6 during the week ending August 4, according to new PHE data.

Households mingling in pubs and houses were blamed for a spike in cases across the city a week after Preston & # 39; s Switch nightclub reopened controversially to punters.

However, locals suggest that the restrictions should not be taken seriously and that pubs should be kept busy on Friday night despite government intervention a few hours earlier.

Preston's lockdown comes a week after the controversial reopening of the Switch nightclub in town to punters

Preston's lockdown comes a week after the controversial reopening of the city's Switch nightclub, pictured left and right

Preston is one of several areas in the north of England that have been closed in recent weeks

Preston is one of several areas in the north of England that have been closed in recent weeks

A man wears a face mask at Preston Market yesterday before the city was closed overnight

A man wears a face mask at Preston Market yesterday before the city was closed overnight

Passengers at Preston respected social distancing and wore masks before new restrictions went into effect starting today

Passengers at Preston respected social distancing and wore masks before new restrictions went into effect starting today

The LGA is calling for councils to be given more powers to close pubs that do not comply with the rules

Permit laws currently do not allow councils to take action on public health grounds, such as failure to follow Covid-19 guidelines. Instead, they rely on general health and safety rules that are less specific and make it difficult to intervene.

The LGA, which represents councils in England and Wales, would like the introduction of a temporary public health target, or Covid-19, that would allow town halls to take action if the premises fail to protect the public during the pandemic – for example this Collect contact information or maintain social distancing.

Current government guidelines state that pubs are only asked to adopt such rules voluntarily, but the LGA insists that this should be made mandatory and legally enforceable.

It is said that most are working hard to adhere to the guidelines, but councils have concerns that some pubs do not collect contact information from customers so they can be reached in the event of a local outbreak.

The local authorities have recently been given the authority to close down premises. However, these may only be used if there is already a serious and immediate risk to public health.

The LGA says that expanding licensing powers would mean they could act quickly and proactively against entities that violate the guidelines to avoid problems rather than only being able to act when it is too late.

It says that the sanctions available under the Licensing Act – for example, the obligation of a company to apply new conditions for safe operation or, in the worst case, to revoke a license – would be better suited to preventing the risk of the infection spreading than those below Health and Health Tools Available Safety Laws.

All residents of the city of Lancashire, home to 140,000 people, are now banned from mixing with other households indoors or in a garden to help contain rising coronavirus rates.

They were also advised not to hang out with friends in an environment such as pubs and restaurants.

Health chiefs warned the measures would be reviewed but threatened tougher action if people fail to comply with restrictions.

The General Director of the City Council today urged young people in the area to obey the rules by delivering a clear message.

Adrian Phillips told BBC Radio 4's Today program, "I know our Public Health Director told young people not to kill Grandma to try to get the message across."

“Young people are inevitably among the brave and brave, they want to be adventurous and on the go, but we know that they have the virus, at the moment they tend to have fewer symptoms, but they take it back. We believe it will in many cases it is young people who take it home and contract the virus.

“We have to repeat it, and if Radio 4 is the right channel for this, I don't know for sure, but we use several channels and work with community groups that do peer-to-peer communication.

"It is just trying to find so many different ways to get the message across to all communities and to all areas of our city that the virus is still something to be really wary of."

He also supported the LGA's call for greater powers to shut down pubs in order to slow the spread of the pandemic.

"You need responsiveness," he said. "It is useful to have something that can move quickly and we can make it absolutely clear to the licensee or the operator what the consequences are."

This morning, 38-year-old Charlene Gardner was in Preston city center to buy school shoes for her two children.

She said, “I was glad the restrictions were put in place because I think we need the police to get involved.

“The pubs around us were 30 or 40 meters outside last night.

"It won't mean any change for us because we didn't see any family anyway, but I saw a reaction online last night and I think a lot of people won't listen."

Preston residents Venkata Reddy Nallamilli, 59 and Ms. Padma, 48, said they had not believed people followed advice on social distancing since lockdown restrictions were relaxed.

Mr. Nallamilli said: “After the lockdown, people did not maintain social distance or wear masks.

“When I go to Sainsbury's I see people not wearing masks and the staff don't enforce this. Some people don't take it seriously. & # 39;

He said he went to the pub on a Saturday but hasn't since the pandemic.

He said, “I take care of my health, I don't want to go. When you go to pubs, we're all together. & # 39;

Hannah Heaton, 28, said the new restrictions that went into effect at Preston were confusing.

She said, “It doesn't make sense that you can't go into houses, but you can meet people outside or go to pubs.

“My grandparents rely on me to help, and now seeing them has been taken away from me. I can not help it.

"I think certain people didn't take it seriously because they didn't think it would affect them."

Dorothy Kinder, 54, said Preston residents need to "go with the flow" about the new restrictions.

She said, “We are at a time when the economy is on the line and people have to go back to work.

"I wouldn't particularly say I agree, but we just have to go along with what we're told."

Preston City Council Director General Adrian Phillips has welcomed calls for more powers to close pubs that do not comply with the rules

Preston City Council Director General Adrian Phillips has welcomed calls for more powers to close pubs that do not comply with the rules

Many people on Fishergate Street wore masks, and a man with a stall selling face masks and not wanting to be named said the town was less busy than last weekend.

But he said he doesn't think people take restrictions seriously.

He said, “You see the elderly wearing masks, but not the younger ones.

"The problem is in the pubs and they don't wear masks there."

The government said the guidelines would make it clear that people should not meet other households indoors.

The congregation restrictions will be reviewed again next week. Changes will be announced by August 14th.

Preston's new restrictions went into effect at midnight, meaning residents cannot have other people in their homes and gardens who cannot visit others’s homes or gardens even if they are in an unaffected area and not with mixed in other households indoors.

Social bubbles are exempt from the restrictions, and residents can meet in groups of up to six – or more than six if exclusively from two households – in outdoor areas such as parks and beer gardens.

Households can also visit indoor hospitality locations as long as they don't mingle with others.

Meanwhile, the LGA is calling for new powers to close pubs that violate rules, as licensing laws currently do not allow councils to take action on public health grounds, such as failure to follow Covid-19 guidelines.

Instead, they must rely on general health and safety rules that are less specific and difficult to intervene.

The LGA, which represents councils in England and Wales, would like the introduction of a temporary public health target, or Covid-19, that would allow town halls to take action if the premises fail to protect the public during the pandemic – for example this Collect contact information or maintain social distancing.

Current government guidelines state that pubs are only asked to adopt such rules voluntarily, but the LGA insists that this should be made mandatory and legally enforceable.

It is said that most are working hard to adhere to the guidelines, but councils have concerns that some pubs do not collect contact information from customers so they can be reached in the event of a local outbreak.

The local authorities have recently been given the authority to close down premises. However, these may only be used if there is already a serious and immediate risk to public health.

The LGA says that expanding licensing powers would mean they could act quickly and proactively against entities that violate the guidelines to avoid problems rather than only being able to act when it is too late.

It says that the sanctions available under the Licensing Act – for example, the obligation of a company to apply new conditions for safe operation or, in the worst case, to revoke a license – would be better suited to preventing the risk of the infection spreading than those below Health and Health Tools Available Safety Laws.

Cllr Nesil Caliskan, Chair of the LGA Committee on Safer and Stronger Communities, said, "The vast majority of businesses are taking the necessary steps to protect people's safety, and councils are working hard to help the premises in these efforts.

“However, some councils are starting to see isolated cases of non-compliance with the guidelines and have limited options to prevent this.

“This is clearly a threat to the communities as people are at risk of infection.

“It must be mandatory that the premises adhere to these government security guidelines, and the councils need the proper powers to intervene and take action if necessary.

& # 39; It doesn't take long for this virus to spread if allowed. While councils don't have to close anywhere, business owners need to know that councils have the power to act when local communities are at risk. & # 39;

The British went to the nation's pubs and bars last night for a drink after a day of scorching weather – as critics accused many of who mingled in large groups to "undo the hard work of the lockdown."

Night owls huddled in bars and flocked to the streets, with many ditching face masks and ignoring social distancing measures until the wee hours of the morning.

Social distancing was nowhere to be seen in Portsmouth as groups mingled in a confined space last night without wearing face coverings

Social distancing was nowhere to be seen in Portsmouth as groups mingled in a confined space last night without wearing face coverings

One night owl was enjoying the end of Leicester's lockdown a little too much. After a Friday night, he took a nap on some benches

One night owl was enjoying the end of Leicester's lockdown a little too much. After a Friday night, he took a nap on some benches

The Local Government Association is calling for councils to be given more powers to shut down anti-infraction pubs nationwide as revelers packed back into venues across the country last night

The Local Government Association is calling for councils to be given more powers to shut down anti-infraction pubs nationwide as revelers packed back into venues across the country last night

The drinkers looked a little worse in Leicester as they enjoyed the end of a strict local lockdown in the city.

One man took a quick nap on a bench while others enjoyed chatting in groups.

Many appeared undisturbed by coronavirus fears as the crowds mingled without masks – despite increasing cases in the UK fueling fears of a second wave.

The UK registered another 871 Covid-19 cases yesterday as official data shows the number of people diagnosed with a life-threatening illness every day has decreased for the first time in a fortnight.

Health ministry statistics show 834 new infections are recorded every day – a slight decrease from the seven-day moving average of 835 yesterday. However, the number of patients who test positive every day is still much higher than the four-month low of 546 on July 8.

Cases have risen steadily since last month, fueling fears of a second wave. However, figures released yesterday suggest that the number of people contracting coronavirus in England has actually decreased by 12 percent in a week.

The Office for National Statistics (ONS), which is gauging the size of the outbreak through swab testing of thousands of people, now estimates that 3,700 people catch Covid-19 every day in England. The estimate of 4,200 daily cases last week led Boris Johnson to declare that he had "pressed the brake pedal" to ease the coronavirus lockdown.

Government scientific advisors warned yesterday that coronavirus reproductive rates could now be as high as one across the UK. SAGE estimates that the R-value – the average number of people each Covid-19 patient will infect – is now between 0.8 and 1.0, compared to last week's prediction that it was between 0.8 and 0.9 was.

Experts say the R has to stay under one or governments risk losing control of the epidemic and the virus could spiral out of control.

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