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Donald Trump says he hired the Syrian dictator Bashar al-Assad to carry out the assassination attempt


President Donald Trump said he hired the Syrian dictator Bashar al-Assad to carry out the assassination attempt, but was stopped by his former defense minister, Jim Mattis.

Trump admitted the recording on Tuesday when he called Fox & Friends to confirm coverage of Bob Woodward's first book on his administration, Fear, published two years ago.

& # 39; I'd rather have taken it out. I finished it. Mattis didn't want to do it. Mattis was a highly overrated general. And I let him go, ”said Trump.

According to Woodward's book & # 39; Fear & # 39; from 2018, Trump wanted to take out al-Assad after using chemical weapons against his people in April 2017.

The commander in chief called Mattis to give the order.

President Donald Trump said Tuesday that he would have the Syrian dictator Bashar al-Assad killed and confirmed the coverage in Bob Woodward's 2018 book about the Trump administration "Fear".

Trump said on Tuesday morning at Fox & Friends when he called, “I'd rather have taken him out. I finished it. Mattis didn't want to do it. Mattis was a highly overrated general. And I let him go & # 39;

Trump said on Tuesday morning at Fox & Friends when he called, “I'd rather have taken him out. I finished it. Mattis didn't want to do it. Mattis was a highly overrated general. And I let him go & # 39;

Trump wanted to assassinate al-Assad (pictured) after using chemical weapons against Syrians in April 2017. Trump said Tuesday that he has no regrets not making the change, despite calling al-Assad "certainly not a good person".

Trump wanted to assassinate al-Assad (pictured) after using chemical weapons against Syrians in April 2017. Trump said Tuesday that he has no regrets not making the change, despite calling al-Assad "certainly not a good person".

“Let's kill him! Let's go inside. Let's kill the damned amount of them, ”Trump said to Mattis, according to Woodward's report.

Mattis agreed with the president's face and then had aides prepare a plan to beat al-Assad's resources "much more carefully," wrote Woodward. That was what happened to cruise missile air strikes against limited targets.

Trump denied in 2018 that an assassination attempt on al-Assad was ever planned.

"No, that was never considered, nor would it be considered," he said then.

Mattis spoke to Woodward about the journalist's new book, "Rage," which was published Tuesday.

Early excerpts from the book by CNN and The Washington Post contained quotes from the ex-DOD chief describing the president as "dangerous", "unfit" and "without a moral compass."

While Trump on & # 39; Fox & Friends & # 39; said he fired Mattis, the general told Woodward that he resigned in December 2018, & # 39; when I was basically instructed to do what I thought was beyond stupid to stupid. "

That "something" was an order to withdraw US troops from Syria.

Mattis also believed that Trump's actions on the global stage gave adversaries a playbook on how to destroy America.

After leaving the administration, he and Dan Coats, the former director of the national intelligence service, discussed whether to take "collective action" and speak out against Trump.

During his Tuesday conversation with the hosts of & # 39; Fox & Friends & # 39; Trump attacked Mattis and called him a & # 39; terrible general & # 39; and a & # 39; bad leader & # 39 ;.

“And he didn't do the job at ISIS. With regard to ISIS, he did not do any work with Syria or Iraq. I got rid of ISIS after he left. I did a great job at ISIS, 100 percent of the Caliphate, ”Trump boasted.

The president was referring to his former Secretary of Defense Jim Mattis, who spoke to Woodward about the journalist's new book and said Trump was "dangerous", "unfit" and "without a moral compass".

The president was referring to his former Secretary of Defense Jim Mattis, who spoke to Woodward about the journalist's new book and said Trump was "dangerous", "unfit" and "without a moral compass".

The president said he did not regret not killing al-Assad.

"I would have lived with that either way," said Trump, noting that the Syrian dictator "is certainly not a good person."

But Trump continued, “Mattis was against it. Mattis was against most of these things. & # 39;

"He'd keep you in the military, but he didn't know how to win," Trump said. "He had no idea how to win."

Trump's treatment of the military has put him in political hot water after The Atlantic reported that he labeled US war deaths "losers" and "fools" and belittled others who had served.

Trump did the reporting of the Atlantic.

But Woodward also reported that Trump once said, "My damn generals are a bunch of pussies" because they cared more about alliances than his trade deals.

Mattis heard the comment and had an adjutant document it in real time via email, says Woodward's book.

Trump's attempt to kill Assad came after a chemical gas attack on the Syrian city of Khan Sheikhoun that killed 86 people, including at least 27 children.

Shocking footage showed adults and children stumbling through the streets of the city, foam pouring from their mouths while struggling to breathe.

When the air strikes Trump then ordered took place on April 6, 2017, Trump said he was acting in America's "vital national security interest" to prevent the use of chemical weapons.

He said: “Assad has smothered the lives of helpless men, women and children with a deadly nerve agent.

& # 39; It was a slow and brutal death for so many. Even beautiful babies were cruelly murdered in this very barbaric attack.

"No child of God should ever suffer such horror."

From his estate in Mar-a-Lago, he added: “It cannot be denied that Syria used banned chemical weapons, violated its obligations under the Chemical Weapons Convention and ignored the urging of the UN Security Council.

& # 39; Years of previous attempts to change Assad's behavior have all failed and failed very dramatically.

As a result, the refugee crisis deepens and the region continues to destabilize, threatening the United States and its allies.

Smoke rose on the Homs Air Force Base, which was attacked by US missile attacks. The military action has already sparked an angry reaction from President Vladimir Putin, who this morning called the airstrikes an "illegal act of attack".

Smoke rose on the Homs Air Force Base, which was attacked by US missile attacks. The military action has already sparked an angry reaction from President Vladimir Putin, who this morning called the air strikes "illegal aggression".

"Tonight I call on all civilized nations to try together with us to end the slaughter and bloodshed in Syria and also to end terrorism of all kinds and types."

Before the speech, Trump had entertained his Chinese counterpart Xi Jinping and their wives over a formal dinner, where the guests dined on Thumbelina carrots and New York strip steak with California Chardonnay.

Less than two hours after dinner began, the U.S. military fired 59 Tomahawk missiles at 8:45 p.m. EDT Thursday at the Assad-controlled al-Shayrat military airfield near Homs, killing at least five and injuring many more .

However, the military action sparked an angry reaction from President Vladimir Putin, who called the air strikes "illegal aggression".

The strikes received widespread international support, and officials said Canada and other allies were behind the move. Further strikes followed in April 2018.

Trump's strike was intended to set a different tone than the actions of the Obama administration, which set a “red line in the sand” on Assad's use of chemical weapons against his own people when a civil war raged in 2012 that was ultimately accepted by Putin Deal offered whereby Assad would surrender his chemical weapons.

It later became clear that the weapons were only partially handed over.

Trump took advantage of what Republicans were saying, indecision and weakness, to meet Hillary Clinton in a 2016 presidential debate, and his campaign linked it to the rise of ISIS – although Clinton was out of office at the time and the connection to ISIS uncertain was.

What prompted Donald Trump to launch air strikes on Syria?

President Donald Trump decided to launch air strikes against the Syrian government – the first time the US had taken military action against the Assad regime – after saying the Syrian leader had crossed "many, many borders".

Trump denounced the chemical attack as an "affront to humanity" and said the "attack on children" and "beautiful babies" "changed" his attitude towards the Syrian government "a lot".

He said Assad's "heinous acts" cannot be tolerated and that he must intervene in the interests of national security.

Worrying footage showed Syrian father Abdul Hamid al-Yousef crying uncontrollably over the graves of his wife and two children who were killed in an alleged sarin gas attack this week

Worrying footage showed Syrian father Abdul Hamid al-Yousef crying uncontrollably over the graves of his wife and two children who were killed in an alleged sarin gas attack this week

It was an alleged attack by a sarin nerve agent on the Syrian city of Khan Sheikhoun that resulted in the agonizing deaths of 86 people, including at least 27 children.

Shattering footage showed adults and children stumbling through the city streets, foam pouring from their mouths as they struggled to breathe.

Saringas is a chemical weapon accidentally made in 1938 by Nazi scientists working on insecticides – and it's 26 times more lethal than cyanide.

The chemist in charge of the project initially believed it had failed because the compound he had created was too lethal to animal and human life to be used in agriculture. This is exactly what Adolf Hitler addressed, whose weapons division took over the project.

Hitler was so pleased with his new weapon that he named it "Sarin" after the scientists who discovered it – Gerhard Schrader, Otto Ambros, Gerhard Ritter and Hans-Jürgen von der Linde.

The effects of exposure to sarin gas are instantaneous and result in an excruciating death. Inhaling even tiny amounts leads to drooling and vomiting in less than ten seconds, while breathing becomes shallow and erratic. Less than a minute after exposure, the victim's nervous system is permanently attacked, so that the body can no longer control breathing. The lungs secrete fluid to expel the gas and cause victims to foam with blood-stained discharges in their mouths.

Many suffer from a disease known as SLUDGE, which means drooling, tearing (tears), urinating, bowel movements, gastrointestinal discomfort, and vomiting (vomiting). The body loses the ability to control its functions.

Abdul was introduced to weighing the bodies of his dead twins after they were killed in the chemical attack in Khan Sheikhoun, Syria's rebel-held central Idlib province

Abdul was pictured weighing the bodies of his dead twins after they were killed in the chemical attack in Khan Sheikhoun, Syria's rebel-held central Idlib province

Many die within minutes of inhaling the gas. The maximum life expectancy is ten minutes after exposure. Those fortunate enough to survive often experience permanent nerve and brain damage from much lower exposure – for example, from touching a contaminated person.

The use of sarin was officially banned in 1997 under the United Nations Convention on Chemical Weapons. But just one year later, the Iraqi dictator Saddam Hussein used Sarin against Kurds in the city of Halabja in 1998 when his warplanes dropped nerve agent bombs and instantly killed 5,000 people. Later, 12,000 are believed to have died from symptoms of the attack.

Most recently, in 2013, Syria removed up to 1,000 kg of sarin from a rebel-held area in Damascus, killing up to 1,400 people. US military intervention was only averted when Russia struck a deal with Syria in which Assad agreed to destroy all supplies of sarin and other chemical weapons.

But he did not destroy all sarin supplies and this week re-used the toxic gas, causing further horror and death.

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