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Donald Trump makes a statement calling for "NO violence, NO violation of the law and NO vandalism".


President Donald Trump issued a White House statement on Wednesday calling for no more violence. According to reports, his supporters could try to disrupt Joe Biden's inauguration.

His statement came when the House of Representatives was debating the charges against him a second time and House Republican leader Kevin McCarthy asked him to take responsibility for last week's MAGA insurgency.

In view of the reports of further demonstrations, I urge that there be NO violence, NO violations of the law and NO vandalism of any kind. That's not what I stand for, and that's not what America stands for. I urge ALL Americans to ease tension and calm down. Thank you, ”was the explanation.

The White House added the statement to its press list after Twitter, Facebook and Instagram froze Trump's social media accounts for inciting violence. Spokeswoman Kayleigh McEnany also tweeted it from her official spokesperson account, and the Trump campaign posted it to followers.

The statement contained multiple words in ALL CAPS – which was a regular feature of Trump's tweets.

President Donald Trump issued a White House statement calling for no more violence. According to reports, his supporters could try to disrupt Joe Biden's inauguration

Republican leader Kevin McCarthy issued a statement on the floor of the House calling on Trump to accept responsibility for last week's MAGA uprising

Republican leader Kevin McCarthy issued a statement on the floor of the House calling on Trump to accept responsibility for last week's MAGA uprising

Security on Capitol Hill visibly increased prior to January 20th when Biden took the oath of office. A three-meter-high anti-climbing fence has been installed around the Capitol Complex and extends into the National Mall, where supporters of an elected president watch as he is sworn in.

The FBI has warned of armed protests in Washington and all 50 of the state's capitals in the run-up to the inauguration, including three separate plans to attack the Capitol.

"The FBI received information about an identified armed group intending to travel to Washington DC on January 16," said a memo, a copy of which was obtained from ABC News. "You have warned that if Congress tries to remove POTUS on the 25th Amendment, there will be a major riot."

There will also be no public access to the Capitol grounds during the inauguration. And officials are increasing the number of National Guard members stationed in Washington from 15,000 to 20,000, about three times the number of US forces currently stationed in Iraq and Afghanistan combined.

About 3,000 National Guard troops were bunkering with MREs and water bottles in the Capitol on Tuesday evening and slept on camouflaged ceilings on the cold marble floors.

Hundreds of members of the National Guard posted to DC following the MAGA mob riot last week were seen sleeping with their rifles and riot gear.

Trump's call for peace also came when the House was debating the charges against him for the second time and at least six Republicans planned to support the resolution.

The indictment instigated violence when pro-Trump insurgents attacked the Capitol last Wednesday.

And if a statement from Republican Leader Kevin McCarthy followed, calling on Trump, during his speech on the floor of the House, to share responsibility for last week's MAGA uprising that resulted in five deaths and destruction in the Capitol.

"The president is responsible for the attack by rioters on Congress on Wednesday," said McCarthy. "He should have denounced the mob as soon as he saw what was going on."

& # 39; These facts call for immediate action from President Trump: take his share of the responsibility. Well the brewing unrest. And ensure that President-elect Biden can begin his term successfully, ”he added.

President Trump on Tuesday denied responsibility for last week's unrest

President Trump on Tuesday denied responsibility for last week's unrest

Hundreds of National Guard troops slept on the stone floor of the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday morning as security increased in Washington a week after Joe Biden's inauguration

Hundreds of National Guard troops slept on the stone floor of the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday morning as security increased in Washington a week after Joe Biden's inauguration

The troops spread in the rotunda of the US Capitol on Wednesday morning

The troops spread in the rotunda of the US Capitol on Wednesday morning

Trump on Tuesday denied any responsibility for last week's uprising, saying his fiery speech to his supporters before they marched on the Capitol was "perfectly appropriate".

In his first public statement since the MAGA storm on the Capitol on Wednesday, the president slammed the Democrats, accusing them of "creating tremendous danger" in trying to remove him from office, but repeatedly saying he wanted " no violence ".

The president defended his speech at a rally on Ellipse where he encouraged his thousands of supporters to "march" on the Capitol.

They did so, leaving five dead and a path of destruction in the form of broken windows, broken furniture, and ruined office space. Dozens have since been rounded up by the police and the FBI.

"When you read my speech – and a lot of people have done it, and I've seen it in both the newspapers and the media, on TV, it has been analyzed – and people thought what I was saying was entirely appropriate "he said. As he boarded Air Force One, he drove to Alamo, Texas, on the Mexican border, to inspect its wall.

"They analyzed my speech and my words, as well as my last paragraph, my last sentence, and anything at a discount that they thought was perfectly appropriate," he continued. He gave no indication of who "they" are.

Trump also denounced the Democrats' efforts to remove him from office, which some Republicans backed to remove him from office – calling it a "danger," not the actions of his supporters.

But he said he didn't want violence from his followers. Trump had reportedly enjoyed the sight of his supporters on Capitol Hill last week and fought for him to illegally serve a second term in the White House. He changed his mind and asked her to resign when he warned that he could be legally held responsible for her actions.

“We don't want violence, never violence. We want absolutely no violence, ”he said repeatedly on Tuesday before going to Texas to announce the completion of a section of its border wall.

“And the impeachment is really a continuation of the greatest witch hunt in the history of politics. It is ridiculous. It's absolutely ridiculous. This impeachment is causing a lot of trouble, ”he said.

He denounced Democratic leaders but made no mention of the Republicans who had urged him to step down.

“It really is a terrible thing that Nancy Pelosi and Chuck Schumer are continuing down this path. I think it is causing enormous danger to our country and it is causing enormous anger. I don't want violence, ”he said.

The House is expected to approve the impeachment fee when voting on Wednesday afternoon.

The House - led by Spokeswoman Nancy Pelosi - is expected to approve the impeachment charges at the Wednesday afternoon vote

The House – led by Spokeswoman Nancy Pelosi – is expected to approve the impeachment charges at the Wednesday afternoon vote

Senator Mitch McConnell's office said Wednesday that the Senate will not come back early to hold Trump's impeachment trial, which means it will begin January 19

Senator Mitch McConnell's office said Wednesday that the Senate will not come back early to hold Trump's impeachment trial, which means it will begin January 19

Security at the Capitol increased ahead of the January 20th housewarming ceremony

Security at the Capitol increased ahead of the January 20th housewarming ceremony

President Donald Trump told his supporters last Wednesday that they would have to "fight" to overthrow the elections

President Donald Trump told his supporters last Wednesday that they would have to "fight" to overthrow the elections

At least 10,000 soldiers will be stationed in Washington by the end of the week, with the possibility of an additional five thousand to secure the Capitol from potentially more violent unrest

At least 10,000 soldiers will be stationed in Washington by the end of the week, with the possibility of an additional five thousand to secure the Capitol from potentially more violent unrest

Guardians are shown asleep at the foot of an Abraham Lincoln statue; The last time US troops stayed in the Capitol was during the Civil War

Guardians are shown asleep at the foot of an Abraham Lincoln statue; The last time US troops stayed in the Capitol was during the Civil War

But Trump paused when Republican Senate Chairman Mitch McConnell announced that the Senate will withhold the trial version of impeachment until lawmakers return to Washington DC on Jan. 19.

Trump is leaving office on January 20, which means the early days of Biden's presidency will begin with his predecessor's trial.

Chuck Schumer, chairman of the Senate minority, had pressured McConnell to agree to bring the Senate back earlier in urgent circumstances, with reports that a trial could begin as early as Friday.

But McConnell's office ditched that idea, which means Trump will end his term in the White House.

If Trump were charged, he would not be able to run for president again. Several Republican senators are believed to be considering presidential offers in 2024.

To indict Trump, it takes a two-thirds majority to convict him, which means at least 17 Republicans would have to find him guilty.

And there's a better chance than 50-50 that McConnell will vote for President Trump's condemnation, according to a new report.

McConnell seems more intent on condemning Trump in an extraordinary twist against the president after five people were killed and destroyed at the Capitol last week.

In an Axios report on Tuesday evening, a top Republican close to McConnell was quoted as saying, "The Senate institutional loyalists are fueling a counter-revolution" to Trump.

McConnell has signaled support for that House Democratic impeachment efforts containing an article indicting the president of "inciting insurrection".

The news follows a report in the New York Times in which McConnell told staff that he believed Trump had "committed criminal acts" and that he was "pleased" with the move to indict him.

McConnell worked successfully to halt impeachment efforts during a trial last year on various counts.

His current view follows reports that McConnell never wants to speak to Trump again after the riot in the Capitol that saw Trump supporters invading the Capitol, destroying leadership offices, and putting lawmakers' lives at risk.

McConnell supports the effort because it will be easier to remove Trump from the party, reports the New York Times.

McConnell has made it clear in private discussions that "now is the time to move on to the weakened lame duck he blames for the Republicans' loss of the Senate," the report said.