ENTERTAINMENT

Donald Trump Introduces New Medical Advisor Who Wants To Open Schools


President Donald Trump signaled a new shift in his public health stance on the coronavirus pandemic at the White House Monday when he heard the presence of Dr. Scott Atlas announced – who warned of the cost of school closings.

It was just one of several areas Trump addressed at a press conference at the White House that was briefly paused after an intelligence agent told Trump he had to end the meeting after the President later said it was an outside shootout the white house.

After Trump declared that he was not shocked by the sudden interruption, he briefly pointed to Atlas, a colleague at Stanford University's Hoover Institution, and mentioned him to the press. He said Atlas, who appeared on Fox News, was "working with us on the coronavirus" and "he has a lot of great ideas".

President Trump said the "great pandemic" of 1917 "likely ended World War II, all soldiers were sick".

The call came after Trump occasionally talked to national health expert Dr. Anthony Fauci had crashed over lockdowns and school closings.

The Conservative commenter welcomed the appointment on his website and wrote on "good news" that he was inducted into the Vice President's coronavirus task force.

Scott Atlas is a brilliant guy and he believes in early October that we might have burned out of COVID. In his opinion, we could see it was getting sluggish, ”the story reads on Limbaugh's website.

The news comes after Trump also talked about coronavirus task force expert Dr. Deborah Birx, tweeted.

Atlas in his speaking office biography says he advised presidential candidates and has been identified as an advisor for former New York Mayor Rudy Giuliani's 2008 campaign.

Scott Atlas, a professor at Stanford University, listens to President of the United States Donald J. Trump during a press conference in the James S. Brady press briefing room at the White House in Washington, DC, the United States, on Aug. 10 2020 speaks. Atlas has the

Scott Atlas, a professor at Stanford University, listens to President of the United States Donald J. Trump during a press conference in the James S. Brady press briefing room at the White House in Washington, DC, the United States, on Aug. 10 2020 speaks. Atlas has questioned the "hysteria" school closings

US Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin (L), Director of Office and Administration (OMB) Russell Vought (C) and Stanford University Professor Scott Atlas (R) listen as US President Donald J. Trump during a press conference speaks in the James S. Brady Press Briefing Room Monday

US Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin (L), Director of Office and Administration (OMB) Russell Vought (C) and Stanford University Professor Scott Atlas (R) listen as US President Donald J. Trump during a press conference speaks in the James S. Brady Press Briefing Room Monday

Employees move after Trump and Dr. Anthony Fauci collided

Employees move after Trump and Dr. Anthony Fauci collided

Atlas spoke to Fox News in mid-July amid a national debate on school closings.

“We are the only country in the world. This is a level of hysteria that I imagine is like living here in a Kafka novel. I mean, I get thousands of emails weekly from all over the world, from professors, teachers, mothers in the US and elsewhere. They are stunned that we are ready to destroy our children simply on the basis of some bizarre notion is totally contrary to science, ”he said.

In May, Atlas contradicted a model that predicted 134,000 deaths by August 4, based on its estimate of the death rate.

The US topped that number, topping 160,000 on August 10.

White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany has often quoted Atlas as she did on the White House podium in July when she said, "Children under the age of 18 have practically no risk of dying from COVID, practically no risk for serious illnesses. "

New York City celebrates VJ Day at the end of World War II in Japan in 1945. Trump linked the 1918 flu pandemic to the end of the war

New York City celebrates VJ Day at the end of World War II in Japan in 1945. Trump linked the 1918 flu pandemic to the end of the war

President Barack Obama (C) signs the Affordable Health Care for America Act during a ceremony with fellow Democrats in the East Room of the White House on March 23, 2010 in Washington, DC. The landmark bill was passed by the House of Representatives on Sunday after a 14-month political battle that left the legislature without a single Republican vote. President Trump said he would sign an executive order to protect those with pre-existing conditions that the law already provides

President Barack Obama (C) signs the Affordable Health Care for America Act during a ceremony with fellow Democrats in the East Room of the White House on March 23, 2010 in Washington, DC. The landmark bill was passed by the House of Representatives on Sunday after a 14-month political battle that left the legislature without a single Republican vote. President Trump said he would sign an executive order to protect those with pre-existing conditions that the law already provides

Trump himself took heat when he said children are "almost immune" to the virus when they are not.

Trump spoke out in favor of Atlas on Monday. "I think schools need to open," said the president. "I think it's very important for business to get schools going."

Atlas offered up-to-date information in an interview in July, even as cases increased.

"When cases come up, that's fine. The most important thing is to prevent a major outbreak of death and serious complications. It does this by protecting the high-risk group," said Atlas. "In fact, we have now protected the high-risk group much better because we are seeing the cases increase tremendously, but the number of hospitalizations is actually decreasing and the number of deaths continues to decrease."

According to Trump's testimony, he reported on the waterfront at a press conference, in which he again pointed out the 1918 flu pandemic compared to the coronavirus crisis. He accidentally linked it to World War II (1939-1945).

“The next one is 1917, they say, right? The big pandemic, certainly a terrible thing, "said Trump.

Then he said it had probably ended World War II, all soldiers were sick.

Trump also defended an executive order, which he was referring to over the weekend, that would provide healthcare protection to Americans with pre-existing medical conditions. He has been asked to issue an order if a ban on denying pre-existing terms is one of Obamacare's core pieces.

Trump regularly railed against the law and helped cut his individual mandate, but those provisions remain in place.

Trump said his order was "just a double safety net and just to let people know that Republicans are already strong for" protection for pre-existing conditions.

"It's a signal to the people. It's a second platform," said Trump, admitting the move was symbolic.

(tagsToTranslate) Dailymail (t) Nachrichten (t) Coronavirus (t) Donald Trump