TECHNOLOGY

Dominic Raab defends the lockdown loosening under the alarm of scientists


Dominic Raab admits that the blockage must be tightened again if there is an "upward trend" in coronavirus cases, since exercise courses and barbecues in England are making a comeback and groups of six friends from different households can meet tomorrow

  • Dominic Raab defended easing in England despite the concerns of the scientists
  • The Foreign Minister said that if there was an "upward trend," the ban could be tightened.
  • Six people from different households can meet tomorrow
  • Here's how you can help people affected by Covid-19

Dominic Raab admitted today that the blockage must be tightened again if there is an "upward trend" in cities or economic sectors.

The Foreign Minister said the government would not hesitate to act as he defended the decision to ease the draconian restrictions despite experts' concerns.

He said that in the future, measures in "localities" or "settings" could be tightened as the number of cases begins to increase again.

Despite the assumption that easing was a “delicate moment”, Mr. Raab insisted: “We cannot just stay in prison forever. We have to pass over. & # 39;

He also downplayed criticism that the curbs are being downgraded, although the government's coronavirus warning system remains at four – indicating that they should stay in place.

Foreign Minister Dominic Raab (pictured today) said the government would not hesitate to act when he defended the decision to relax draconian restrictions

Mr. Johnson (pictured this morning on Downing Street) has announced that the block restrictions in England will be eased slightly starting tomorrow

Mr. Johnson (pictured this morning on Downing Street) has announced that the block restrictions in England will be eased slightly starting tomorrow

A number of experts expressed concern about measures to loosen the blockade in England that will take effect tomorrow, with Britain still suffering from 8,000 new infections per day.

Up to six people from six different households can meet in public places or in gardens, which means that practice courses and barbecues are back on the agenda.

Primary schools and kindergartens have also been informed that they can reopen, while all non-essential businesses can return from June 15th.

In Scotland and Wales, easing is far less dramatic: only two households can meet at the same time and people should not travel more than eight kilometers from home. The schools north of the border will only be back after the holidays in August.

When asked if the blockage will tighten again as infection rates increase, Mr. Raab said to Sky’s Ridge on Sunday, “We will aim if there is an upward trend and it could be a location if it is a specific location, carefully target measures that are applied so that we can take these steps while maintaining control of the virus. & # 39;

Nicola Sturgeon today accused England of failing to adequately report nursing home deaths when she attacked Mr. Johnson for loosening the lock too early.

The Scottish First Minister said that the apparently higher proportion of victims in nursing homes north of the border is due to the way they are recorded.

She insisted that people who died of a stroke and "accidentally" suffered from coronavirus were counted in Scotland – while they were not in England, which meant that there was "under-reporting".

When asked in Sky News if she thought the prime minister was releasing the lock too quickly in England, Ms. Sturgeon insisted that she didn't want to criticize other politicians and everyone tried to do the right things.

But she specifically said that they are "very careful" in Scotland. "This virus hasn't gone," she said. "That's why we move very slowly in Scotland."

Prof. Devi Sridhar, who advised the Scottish government, warned that it was "inevitable" that the cases would reappear in England.

Nicola Sturgeon accused England of failing to adequately report nursing home deaths when she attacked Boris Johnson for prematurely easing the ban

Nicola Sturgeon accused England of failing to adequately report nursing home deaths when she attacked Boris Johnson for prematurely easing the ban

"I'm very sorry to say that I think looking at the numbers is inevitable at the moment," she said to Sky.

"The only thing that could save England in some way is the good weather and warmth when this virus actually dies out pretty quickly, but it's incredibly worrying because the numbers aren't low enough to run a testing and tracking system allow."

"If your goal is to contain the virus, lower the numbers, and in some way try to get rid of it so that nobody is exposed to it, then opening yourself up is not the right thing to do," she said.

"It's a big risk and gamble to end the lock with more deaths than we did when we actually started the lock months ago."

Prof. Sridhar said there is now a clear separation between the government and some scientists, but added that ultimately decisions are made by politicians.

She said, "I think what you should say is that you look at science and hopefully listen, but the decision and who is really responsible are the politicians and leaders."

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