TECHNOLOGY

Dominic Grieve hits Boris Johnson for acting "like a four-year-old with a tantrum".


Exiled Tory rebel Dominic Grieve struck Boris Johnson today because he had behaved "like a four-year-old with a tantrum" when he warned the Prime Minister that he would be jailed if he ignored Parliament.

Mr Grieve, who had been whipped when he voted against the government last week, launched an angry attack on the prime minister for proposing to break the law to bring about Brexit.

The anti-no-deal law supported by Mr. Grieve was to receive royal approval on Monday after peers agreed to its adoption on Friday.

Mr. Grieve told Sky News on Saturday: “I am appalled that a prime minister, a conservative prime minister who says he is a conservative, should do this. We are a party that upholds the rule of law and our constitution.

Dominic Grieve, a former Tory MP whose whip was removed for rebellion last week, said today that Mr. Johnson must obey the law, otherwise he will be jailed (picture: in the lower house on Wednesday).

"He is about to destroy the constitution and now – apparently – he says he is breaking the law. It's just – it's actually ridiculous, it's shameful.

"He is like a four-year-old with a tantrum, it is actually a disgraceful behavior, quite astonishing and once again underlines the extraordinary nature of this prime minister, and I am afraid of his inability to take office."

Mr Johnson said he would rather be "dead in a ditch" than seek further Brexit delay

Mr Johnson said he would rather be "dead in a ditch" than seek further Brexit delay

The law requires Mr. Johnson to request a further delay in Brexit if an agreement cannot be reached with Brussels before October 19. The prime minister says he would rather die in a ditch than beg in front of his European counterparts.

Mr. Grieve's comments were in line with former Prosecutor General Lord MacDonald's who said today that Mr. Johnson could be detained.

Mr. MacDonald told Sky News: "A refusal to do so would mean a contempt for the court that this person could find in prison."

The Prime Minister wrote to all Tory members last night to indicate that he would rather oppose the law than ask Brussels to delay Britain's exit from the EU.

The prime minister said he was only "theoretically" bound by a law that takes a no deal Brexit off the table.

In his letter, he reaffirmed his determination to stand up against Remainers and said: “You have just passed a law that would force me to ask Brussels to extend the Brexit deadline. I will never do that. & # 39;

And his special advisor Dominic Cummings is said to have "interpreted the anti-no-deal legislation" differently, because he believes that this will not force Mr. Johnson to request an extension of the Brexit.

Tory-Grandeur Iain Duncan Smith asked him to keep his nerve last night and said he would be martyred if he violated the law and risked a possible prison sentence for neglecting Parliament.

Johnson (pictured this week) previously said he would not request another extension from Brussels because the incoming law will force him to do so if no agreement is reached by October 19

Lord MacDonald, 66 (pictured), said if Johnson decides to ignore a bill that prevents a no-deal exit, he could be prosecuted

Lord MacDonald, 66 (right), said if Johnson (left) decides to ignore a bill that prevents a no-deal exit, he could be prosecuted

Mr. Duncan Smith told The Telegraph: “This is about Parliament Against People. Boris Johnson is on the side of the people who voted to leave the EU.

“The people are sovereign because they choose the parliament. But Parliament wants to stop the will of the people. & # 39;

But others, including his cabinet ministers, are calling on him to abandon his Brexit strategy and "work out a Plan B" after opposition parties thwarted his early parliamentary election plans.

It comes as:

  • Cabinet ministers asked the prime minister to come up with Plan B in the event of failed early elections
  • Members of the European Research Group are reported to be in talks with the Brexit Party
  • A Daily Mail poll shows that the public supports a no-deal exit via Jeremy Corbyn for PM
  • The anti-no-deal bill is expected to receive royal approval on Monday after this week's debate
  • Former Tory MP Dominic Grieve said the prime minister cannot ignore the law.

Also today, it was reported that Boris Johnson's controversial advisor believes the Prime Minister will not have to apply for a Brexit renewal under the new anti-no-deal legislation.

Could Boris Johnson break the law to get a deal-free Brexit?

Boris Johnson has stated that under no circumstances will he ask the EU to delay Brexit.

If the anti-no-deal legislation is included in the code on Monday, he must legally ask Brussels to postpone the departure date until October 19, a few days before October 31.

Many people believe that Mr. Johnson will rather than break his Brexit promise "Do or Die".

But if he tries to stay on Downing Street and keep his Brexit promise, he'll be on the right track to break the law – an unthinkable prospect for any prime minister.

Any attempt not to comply with what Parliament said would spark the mother of all political controversy and almost certainly pose legal challenges.

Ultimately, MEPs have the power to oust Mr. Johnson in such circumstances by convening and winning a vote of no confidence after MEPs return to parliament on October 14th.

This would allow Remainer MPs to form a temporary government and send their own representative to Brussels to request an extension before an election is likely to be triggered.

Before that point, however, number 10 could try to find a solution.

For example, there was speculation in Westminster that Mr. Johnson could refuse to go to Brussels himself, but could send someone else in his place.

This would be politically toxic as it would still promise to break or die and make the Tories be eaten alive by the Brexit party.

If posting a cabinet colleague was politically too difficult, it was proposed to send a senior official to meet the requirements of the law because the prime minister was unwilling to do so.

But even here, such an approach would still affect Mr. Johnson's Brexit references.

Downing Street could also try to make a legal argument against regulatory compliance, as talks with the EU are ongoing and efforts should be focused on concluding an agreement.

Such an argument is unlikely to carry much weight in court.

Ultimately, if the prime minister breaks the law, it will have consequences, making resignation more likely.

Dominic Cummings, 47, is said to "interpret the meaning and impact of the rebel legislation" differently – which is expected to receive royal approval on Monday.

Legislation stipulates that the Prime Minister will delay Brexit after October 31 if Britain and Brussels fail to reach an agreement ahead of Halloween.

According to Sky News, Cummings said at a special adviser meeting last night that the prime minister would not have to do this, which triggered a heated debate about how legally watertight the new legislation is.

It was also reported at the meeting that Mr. Johnson will spend the next five weeks in the election campaign – regardless of whether an election has been scheduled.

Mr. Johnson's recent plans for an early election seemed to have failed again last night due to a "stitch-up" between Jeremy Corbyn and Remain parties.

Labor, the Lib Dems and Scots, and Welsh nationalists agreed to prevent the public from voting before October 31.

The prime minister remains pending and must decide whether to resign or oppose a law passed by MPs who rule out a no-deal Brexit.

He has emphatically ruled out further delays.

If Mr. Johnson does not do Parliament's will, he risks being brought to justice and if a judge orders him to obey Parliament, he could be despised and even jailed for refusal.

A senior government official has now said that his entire strategy is "in ruins" and that he needs to "rethink" Downing Street's approach.

Today, however, it turned out that members of the European Research Group reportedly had "very preliminary" talks with the Brexit Party leader about the possibility of a pact saying that it would be "crazy" not to pursue anyone.

However, there are concerns that the plan could be frustrated by Mr. Cummings, who, as the director of Vote Leave, refused to partner with Nigel Farage when he helped manage Leave.EU.

A source told The Daily Telegraph: "There have been talks between the Brexit Party and the ERG. Not only with Farage, but also at the local level. The feeling is that it would be crazy to have the Remainer form an alliance, but not the Brexiteeers. & # 39;

The news comes when high-ranking Tory Brexiteer Steve Baker warned on Tuesday that Boris Johnson must close a deal with the Brexit party before an early general election in order to hope for a majority.

The new law, which blocks No Deal, precludes an early election ahead of the October 17 European Council summit, as Labor and other opposition parties want the threat to leave the EU on Halloween to end before giving up another one Agree poll.

There are concerns that Dominic Cummings (pictured), Boris Johnson's chief strategist, could frustrate plans for a pact between the Tory party and Farge's Brexit party. As director of Vote Leave, he refused to partner with Nigel Farage when he helped manage Leave.EU

There are concerns that Dominic Cummings (pictured), Boris Johnson's chief strategist, could frustrate plans for a pact between the Tory party and Farge's Brexit party. As director of Vote Leave, he refused to partner with Nigel Farage when he helped manage Leave.EU

Labor, the Liberal Democrats, the SNP and Plaid Cymru met on Friday and agreed to block the Prime Minister's election application when it is redirected to the House of Commons on Monday.

A similar request was rejected by MPs on Wednesday because the two-thirds threshold required to dissolve Parliament was not reached.

Opposition parties believe that they have successfully supported Mr. Johnson in a corner of his promise to leave on October 31 to do or die.

They will vote or abstain if the Prime Minister submits another general election offer on Monday.

Mr Johnson's recent plans for an early election seemed to have failed again last night due to a clash between Jeremy Corbyn (pictured) and remain parties

Mr. Johnson was asked by Tory-Grandeur Iain Duncan Smith to keep his nerve last night and said he would be martyred if he violated the law and risked a possible prison sentence for neglecting Parliament

British Labor Party opposition leader Jeremy Corbyn leaves his home in north London (left) and Torys Grandeur Iain Duncan Smith (right) urges the Prime Minister to become a Brexit martyr

The prime minister was forced into two lanes: resign or resign. He will resign if he has to make that choice, according to the viewer's political editor, James Forsyth.

In the sun he wrote that a source had told him: “The public is increasingly realizing that MPs and Jeremy Corbyn want to delay Brexit and Boris wants to achieve this. It is good for us and bad for them. & # 39;

If he resigned, the Queen would ask MPs if anyone else could form a government capable of commanding a majority in the lower house, and if the answer was no, there should be a choice. The law would continue to require Brexit to be delayed, with a survey expected to take place in November.

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