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Disturbing scenes of polar bears' footprints can be seen on tiny chunks of ice floating out into the sea


Explorers have discovered polar bear footprints on broken pieces of ice in the Arctic.

Greenpeace ship Arctic Sunrise is sailing near Greenland, where huge pieces of its ice caps have broken off.

They discovered the footprints on the small sections of ice during their trip while studying the effects of climate change on the region.

Explorers have apparently found polar bear footprints on broken pieces of ice in the Arctic

Greenpeace's Arctic Sunrise ship discovered the prints on the chunks of ice when huge amounts broke off

Greenpeace's Arctic Sunrise ship discovered the prints on the chunks of ice when huge amounts broke off

While polar bears often spend time on sea ice, there are fears about habitat loss due to rising temperatures and melting ice.

The small section of ice seemed very far from any other country that scientists fear could lead to extinction.

The lack of sea ice cover forces bears to swim long distances, depleting their energy stores and leading to drowning.

They discovered the footprints on the small sections of ice during their trip while studying the effects of climate change on the region

They discovered the footprints on the small sections of ice during their trip while studying the effects of climate change on the region

It will also affect the ability of pregnant women to establish suitable maternity wards.

It comes after Sir David Attenborough warned polar bears could be extinct by 2030 due to melting ice.

He said: “The Arctic Ocean is expected to have its first completely ice-free summer in the 2030s, resulting in open water at the North Pole.

“For the polar bear, who relies on the northern sea ice as a platform for seal hunting, this is devastating.

It comes after Sir David Attenborough warned polar bears could be extinct by 2030 due to melting ice

It comes after Sir David Attenborough warned polar bears could be extinct by 2030 due to melting ice

The experienced broadcaster warned that polar bear cubs are getting smaller and smaller and will soon no longer survive winter

The experienced broadcaster warned that polar bear cubs are getting smaller and smaller and will soon no longer survive winter

& # 39; As the ice-free period lengthened, scientists noticed a worrying trend. Pregnant women, deprived of their reserves, now gave birth to younger boys.

“It is entirely possible that summer will last a little longer in a year and that the boys born that year will be so small that they will not be able to survive their first polar winter. This whole population of polar bears would then crash. & # 39;

An estimated 42.3 square miles of the Greenland ice cap floats in the northeastern Arctic, which scientists say is evidence of rapid climate change.

The section of glacier broke off the fjord called Nioghalvfjerdsfjorden, which is roughly 50 miles long and 12 miles wide, the National Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland said on Monday.

Researchers who worked for the Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland (GEUS) examined satellite images of the ice shelf that were taken over the past seven years. On the left is the shelf in 2013 and on the right is the same shelf this year

Researchers who worked for the Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland (GEUS) examined satellite images of the ice shelf that were taken over the past seven years. On the left is the shelf in 2013 and on the right is the same shelf this year

The glacier is at the end of the northeast Greenland ice stream, where it flows from land into the ocean.

Annual changes at the end of the melting season for the largest Arctic ice shelf in northeast Greenland are measured using optical satellite imagery, according to the survey known as GEUS.

It shows that land losses have exceeded 19 square miles in each of the past two years.

The ice shelf has lost 62 square miles since 1999.

"We should be very concerned about the seemingly advancing disintegration in the largest remaining ice shelf in the Arctic," said GEUS Professor Jason Box.

Greenpeace spokeswoman Laura Meller, who is aboard the organization's Arctic Sunrise ship at the edge of the sea ice, said: “Another massive piece of vital sea ice has fallen into the ocean.

"This is yet another alarm bell ringing by the climate crisis in a rapidly heating Arctic."

Last week, Ruth Mottram, an ice scientist at the Danish Meteorological Institute in Copenhagen, said: "This year, too, the ice cover has lost more ice than was added in the form of snow."

She added, "What is thought-provoking is that if we had … seen this collapse 30 years ago, we would have said it was extreme.

"In the last few years we have got used to a high collapse."

GLACIERS AND ICE SHEETS THAT MELT HAVE A "DRAMATIC IMPACT" ON GLOBAL SEA LEVELS

Global sea levels could rise up to 3 meters if the Thwaites Glacier collapses in West Antarctica.

The rise in sea levels threatens cities from Shanghai to London, low-lying areas of Florida or Bangladesh, and entire nations like the Maldives.

For example, in the UK, an increase of 2 meters or more can cause areas such as Hull, Peterborough, Portsmouth and parts of east London, as well as the Thames Estuary, to become submerged.

The collapse of the glacier, which could begin in decades, could also flood large cities like New York and Sydney.

Parts of New Orleans, Houston and Miami in the southern United States would also be particularly affected.

A 2014 study by the Association of Affected Scientists examined 52 sea level indicators in communities in the United States.

It has been determined that the flood disaster will increase dramatically in many locations on the east and Gulf coasts, based on a conservative estimate of predicted sea level rise based on current data.

The results showed that the number and severity of tidal flooding in most of these communities will increase sharply in the coming decades.

By 2030, more than half of the 52 municipalities surveyed will experience an average of at least 24 tidal floods per year in exposed areas, provided that the sea level rises moderately. Twenty of these communities have tripled or more in flood events.

The mid-Atlantic coast is expected to have some of the greatest frequencies of flooding. Places like Annapolis, Maryland, and Washington, DC can expect tidal surges in excess of 150 per year, and several locations in New Jersey could experience tidal surges of 80 or more.

In the UK, a two meter rise would mean that large parts of Kent would be almost completely submerged by 2040. This emerges from the results of a paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Science in November 2016.

Areas on the south coast such as Portsmouth and Cambridge and Peterborough would also be badly affected.

Cities and towns around the Humber Estuary such as Hull, Scunthorpe and Grimsby would also face severe flooding.

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