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Disney slaps racism warnings on classic Peter Pan, Dumbo and The Jungle Book films


Disney is proposing racist warnings against the classics Peter Pan, Dumbo and The Jungle Book for "negative racist depictions and mistreatment of people or cultures".

  • All popular classics were preceded by warnings about the Disney + streaming service
  • The warnings are understood as part of an ongoing review Disney has carried out on its extensive back catalog films
  • Other features of the warning include The Aristocats, Lady and the Tramp, and the Swiss Robinsonn family
  • Disney + also made a decision to completely overlook certain features, including the controversial 1946 film Song Of The South

A number of classic animated Disney films have received warnings in order to draw the attention of potentially sensitive viewers to negative racist depictions or outdated ethnic stereotypes.

The popular films Peter Pan, The Jungle Book and Dumbo were preceded by warnings from the streaming service Disney +, which is part of the ongoing march in Hollywood's fight against racism.

A message to viewers reads: “This program contains negative portrayals and / or abuse of people or cultures.

“Those stereotypes were wrong then and are wrong now. Instead of removing this content, we want to recognize its harmful effects, learn from it, and stimulate conversation so that together we can create a broader future. & # 39;

Warning: A number of classic Disney animated films, including Peter Pan (pictured), have received content warnings to alert viewers to negative racist depictions

Not so harmless: Dumbo comes under fire for his references to racial segregation laws in the deep south as well as for the use of affected Afro-American voices

Not so harmless: Dumbo comes under fire for his references to racial segregation laws in the deep south as well as for the use of affected Afro-American voices

What are the warnings for every Disney movie?

Peter Pan (1953): Viewers are warned that American Indians are referred to as "redskins" and that dancing in Native American headgear is a "form of ridicule and appropriation of" Native American culture and imagery. "

The Aristocats (1970): Warning highlights a scene in which one of the cats – voiced by a white actor – sings stereotypical Chinese "words" with an accent while playing the piano with a pair of chopsticks.

Jungle Book (1967): Film highlighted for its perceived use of negative racial stereotypes.

Lady and the Tramp: The film was put on the list courtesy of Siamese cats Si and Am based on perceived stereotyping of Asians, while one pound of dogs features canine teeth with largely ethnic names and accents.

The warnings are understood as part of an ongoing review Disney has carried out on its extensive back catalog films.

Other features of the warning include the 1970 musical comedy The Aristocats, the canine love story Lady and the Tramp – a Disney hit in 1955 – and the 1960 Swiss Family Robinson adventure.

Regarding The Aristocats – a film about a group of musical cats – Disney warns viewers of a scene in which one of the cats, voiced by a white actor, sings stereotypical Chinese "words" while playing the piano with chopsticks.

Meanwhile, Peter Pan warns viewers that Native American Indians are known as "redskins."

Disney also claims scenes with Peter and The Lost Boys dancing in Native American headgear are "a form of ridicule and appropriation of Native American culture and imagery."

The Jungle Book, an adaptation of Rudyard Kipling's 1967 novel, has also been highlighted for its perceived use of negative racial stereotypes.

Elsewhere, Dumbo's 1941 publication comes under fire for its references to racial segregation laws in the Deep South, as well as the use of affected African American voices.

Lady and the Tramp was added to the list courtesy of Siamese cats Si and Am due to the perceived stereotyping of Asians, while one pound of dogs features canines with largely ethnic names and accents, including Mexican and Russian.

It's a bear need: The Jungle Book, an adaptation of Rudyard Kipling's 1967 novel, has also been highlighted for its perceived use of negative racial stereotypes

It's a bear need: The Jungle Book, an adaptation of Rudyard Kipling's 1967 novel, has also been highlighted for its perceived use of negative racial stereotypes

In the dog house: Lady and Tramp was put on the list due to the perceived stereotyping of Asians

In the dog house: Lady and Tramp was put on the list due to the perceived stereotyping of Asians

Disney + also made a decision to completely overlook certain features, including the controversial 1946 film Song Of The South.

Set on a plantation during America's Reconstruction era, the film has never been released on DVD or video in the United States due to its uncomfortable dealings with races.

Reviewer Richard B. Dier wrote for The Afro-American after its publication, referring to it as "The Afro-American" "As vicious a piece of white supremacy propaganda as Hollywood has ever produced."

Divisive: Disney + also made the decision to completely overlook certain features, including the controversial 1946 film Song Of The South

Divisive: Disney + also made a decision to completely overlook certain features, including the controversial 1946 film Song Of The South

Unreleased: Song of the South is on a plantation during the American Reconstruction and has never released a DVD or video in the US due to its uncomfortable dealings with races

Unreleased: Song of the South is on a plantation during the American Reconstruction and has never released a DVD or video in the US due to its uncomfortable dealings with races

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