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Did Boris cancel Halloween? # 10 warns of trick or treating, including fines for parents


Boris Johnson tonight accused the "bubble" audience of causing a coronavirus resurgence, forcing him to institute localized bans that have affected millions of Britons – effectively canceling Halloween.

The Prime Minister accused voters of being "complacent" and re-breeding Covid-19 over the summer, despite the fact that his government allowed pubs to reopen and encouraged people to "eat out to help beleaguered companies" in August.

His comments in an interview with BBC Scotland came when No10 poured a cauldron of humbug on Halloween fun with a trick or treating warning.

A spokesman told reporters that thousands of families locked in place across much of England should not mingle when asked if traditional scary events should take place on October 31st.

And it warned that the rule of six applied elsewhere, meaning parents could face fines of up to £ 200 for going door-to-door in larger groups for their children to get candy.

Mr Johnson spoke in an interview about Margaret Ferrier, the SNP MP who has to resign as a MP after traveling from Glasgow to London and back while suffering from coronavirus.

When asked if she should stop, he said, “I'll leave that very much to the SNP and their whips – that is up to you to decide, but it is very important that everyone obey the rules and instructions – because you saw what happened in March and April in Scotland, across the country, we got together and got rid of the virus.

"Unfortunately, since then, everyone has gotten a little, you know, complacent and a little smug about the broadcast and the social distancing rules may not have been followed the way they could have been or enforced as they could have been and so we had to take action, both in Scotland and elsewhere, to bring it back down. & # 39;

And in a second interview with the local BBC in the Northeast, he added, "What happened in the summer was a kind of fraying of people's discipline and observance of these rules."

Jonathan Ashworth, Shadow Health Secretary, said: "Boris Johnson is desperate to put the blame on the British people when the real failure to fix tests is causing this virus to run out of control. The British people deserve better. & # 39;

It came out of fears that London might soon follow parts of the Northeast and Northwest, including Newcastle and Liverpool, into a localized lockdown.

Tonight, 770 students at Northumbria University in Newcastle tested positive for Covid-19 as the city was named England's coronavirus epicenter.

All students, 78 of whom are symptomatic, isolate with their flatmates and close contacts for 14 days.

The Prime Minister's deputy spokesman was repeatedly asked whether trick or treating is possible around October 31st and said, “The rule of six is ​​clear, it includes children. We ask people not to meet in groups of six or more. & # 39;

The Prime Minister's deputy spokesman was repeatedly asked if trick or treating was possible around October 31st and said, “The rule of six is ​​clear, it includes children. We ask people not to meet in groups of six or more. & # 39;

An Office for National Statistics (ONS) report released today estimated that there were 8,400 cases of the disease daily in England for the week ended September 24. That's a 12.5 percent decrease from the 9,600 infections believed to have occurred each day for the week before

An Office for National Statistics (ONS) report released today estimated that there were 8,400 cases of the disease daily in England for the week ended September 24. This is a 12.5 percent decrease from the 9,600 infections believed to have occurred each day for the previous week

Coronaphobia is back: three quarters are now either very or slightly concerned about the impact the disease is having on their lives, according to the latest ONS indicators

Coronaphobia is back: three quarters are now either very or slightly concerned about the impact the disease is having on their lives, according to the latest ONS indicators

Coronaphobia is back: Only 20 percent of adults said they met a different household in a private location last week, up from 30 percent the previous week, an ONS survey shows

Coronaphobia is back: Only 20 percent of adults said they met a different household in a private location last week, up from 30 percent the previous week, an ONS survey shows

The proportion of travel to work declined from 64 to 59 percent after government guidelines shifted to recommend it whenever possible

The proportion of travel to work declined from 64 percent to 59 percent after government guidance shifted to recommend it whenever possible

How Covid-19 infection rates doubled in most local restricted areas

One in three Britons will be living under tougher Covid-19 rules than the rest of the country tomorrow, although data shows local lockdowns don't work in most places and infection rates have actually increased.

As of Saturday, two million residents in Liverpool, Warrington, Hartlepool and Middlesbrough will no longer be allowed to meet people they don't live with indoors to contain outbreaks.

This means a total of 22.4 million Britons will be living under some form of economically crippling and socially restrictive local shutdown. Ministers have justified the measures by claiming they are the only way to stop a second national wave of the disease.

However, data shows that Covid-19 infections have doubled in most areas of England that are subject to long-term restrictions. In 11 out of 16 English cities that have suffered lockdowns in the past nine weeks, the rate of infection has at least doubled and in some cases has increased by more than ten-fold.

Bolton, the UK's current Covid-19 hotspot, has had 200 infections per 100,000 in the past seven days, up from 14 per 100,000 on July 31. In Wigan, cases have increased from seven per 100,000 people to 102 over the same period.

Luton is the only area in the country that has succeeded in bringing cases down to the point where they can break the shackles of a local lockdown – but even Bedfordshire town could face renewed restrictions as cases rise again.

Scientists, MPs and local leaders say compliance with the rules is low because they were too "complex and confusing" to follow. In Middlesbrough, Mayor Andy Preston said he was "defying the government" and that his city would "not accept these measures" because there was no evidence they would work.

According to a survey, at least 50 UK universities have now confirmed Covid-19 outbreaks, with 1,800 cases noted among students and staff.

It follows the news that Newcastle infections have risen 60 percent to 250 cases per 100,000, according to health officials.

One in three Britons will be living under tougher Covid-19 rules than the rest of the country tomorrow, although data shows local lockdowns don't work in most places and infection rates have actually increased.

As of Saturday, two million residents in Liverpool, Warrington, Hartlepool and Middlesbrough will no longer be allowed to meet people they don't live with indoors to contain outbreaks.

This means a total of 22.4 million Britons will be living under some form of economically crippling and socially restrictive local shutdown. Ministers have justified the measures by claiming they are the only way to stop a second national wave of the disease.

However, data shows that Covid-19 infections have doubled in most areas of England that are subject to long-term restrictions. In 11 out of 16 English cities that have suffered lockdowns in the past nine weeks, the rate of infection has at least doubled and in some cases has increased by more than ten-fold.

Bolton, the UK's current Covid-19 hotspot, has had 200 infections per 100,000 in the past seven days, up from 14 per 100,000 on July 31. In Wigan, cases rose from seven per 100,000 people to 102 over the same period.

Luton is the only area in the country that has succeeded in bringing cases down to the point where they can break the shackles of a local lockdown – but even Bedfordshire town could face renewed restrictions as cases pick up again.

Even so, Downing Street took a tough line against Halloween this morning

The Prime Minister's deputy spokesman was repeatedly asked whether trick or treating was possible around October 31st and said, “The rule of six is ​​clear, it includes children. We ask people not to meet in groups of six or more.

“In local restricted areas, it was very clear to us that households should not mix. In other areas that are not blocked, the rule of six applies.

"It is right that parents should be fined if children meet in groups of more than six children."

Scientists, MPs and local leaders say compliance with the rules is low because they were too "complex and confusing" to be followed. In Middlesbrough, Mayor Andy Preston said he was "defying the government" and that his city would "not accept these measures" because there was no evidence they would work.

Boris Johnson is due to meet with heads of state in the capital next week as fears rise over the number of cases.

Mayor Sadiq Khan has called for more restrictions.

Last night he was involved in an argument with Shaun Bailey, the Tory candidate in the mayoral election due to take place in May.

In an article for City AM newspaper, Mr. Bailey discussed government homework rules.

“Take a look around London and you will see a city that has stalled. Pipe consumption has decreased by 70 percent. Main streets are empty. 69 percent of Londoners still work from home, ”he wrote.

“We can talk about the cost to the economy – but we should also think about the cost to the Londoners themselves. Because the truth is, I don't think coronavirus is a good reason to put hundreds of thousands of jobs at risk.

Locals support the rebellious Mayor of Middlesbrough for rejecting the lockdown and vowing to ignore new restrictions

Middlesbrough locals have rallied around their rebellious mayor after he vowed to defy the government lockdown to protect the "jobs and mental health" of residents.

Andy Preston, an independent, hit ministers for their "monstrous and frightening lack of communication and ignorance" in the strongest backlash ever to local lockdowns, which now affect 20 million people – nearly a third of the UK population.

Voters backed him because he stood up for the people and tried to stop companies from going bust as some said they would ignore the new restrictions.

The economic cost of local lockdowns is becoming increasingly apparent. The pub industry warns that a quarter of venues could be permanently closed at the cost of 290,000 jobs and £ 7 billion for the UK if restrictions persist well into next year.

The lockdown in Middlesbrough begins Saturday morning – one minute past midnight – and prohibits people from meeting anyone outside their household, including pubs and restaurants, indoors.

Lockdowns in Hartlepool, Warrington and the Liverpool City Region, which includes Knowsley, Sefton, St. Helens and Wirral, will occur at the same time as Middlesbrough.

“Our city is built on people. And the more restrictions people have, the more our city cannot function.

"If we keep putting new restrictions on businesses and workers, we'll put livelihoods at risk – from small businesses to people who struggled long before the coronavirus outbreak."

Mr. Khan replied and said, “This is very dangerous. Please ignore him. The government advises working from home when you can – scientists say it could save lives.

"Londoners 'demand to disregard scientific and medical advice is putting Londoners' lives at risk."

It came when Nicola Sturgeon today called on one of her own MPs to resign after violating the coronavirus self-isolation rules in order to attend the Commons.

The First Minister called on Margaret Ferrier to "do the right thing" as she was widely condemned for her "absolutely unacceptable" behavior of going to Westminster while suffering from symptoms – and then taking the train after a positive test drove back to Scotland.

Rutherglen & Hamilton West's apparent breach of Quarantine Act could result in a fine of £ 4,000. DUP MP Jim Shannon announced this afternoon that he had dinner with Ms. Ferrier in Parliament on Monday night and was asked to self-isolate but has since tested negative.

Ms. Sturgeon said she had made Ms. Ferrier "crystal clear" that she should resign. "I spoke to Margaret Ferrier and clarified my view that she should step down as a MP," she said.

“I did it with a heavy heart – she is a friend and colleague – but her actions were dangerous and unjustifiable. I have no power to force an MP to resign, but I hope she will do the right thing. & # 39;

Earlier this morning, the Westminster boss of the SNP, Ian Blackford, who had already taken the whip from her, said she had to "think about her position". "I think it's obvious what to do," he told BBC Breakfast.

The Commons said a person who had come into contact with Ms. Ferrier had been asked to self-isolate and an investigation should be carried out into who else might be at risk. Additional cleaning precautions have also been taken – although the damage may already have been done.

And new research today has shown that coronaphobia is once again widespread among the British as the number of cases and restrictions increase.

A man stands in a NOVID disinfection booth during a demonstration in Liverpool city center. NOVID is a walk-in fogger designed to eliminate the prospect of COVID-19 not just for the person walking through it, but also for the clothing they are wearing

A man stands in a NOVID disinfection booth during a demonstration in Liverpool city center. NOVID is a walk-in fogger designed to eliminate the prospect of COVID-19 not just for the person walking through it, but also for the clothing they are wearing

Although the current number of positive tests seems high, and higher than during the March and April peak, scientists predict that more than 100,000 people will have contracted the virus by the spring and tests would have taken tens of thousands every day if the same Amount of swabs was then made

Although the current number of positive tests seems high, and higher than during the March and April peak, scientists predict that more than 100,000 people will have contracted the virus by the spring and tests would have taken tens of thousands every day if the same Amount of swabs was then made

Fear of the disease has peaked since May when the government scrambled to control the rise in infections – a third of the population is now on-site lockdown.

Three quarters are now either very or slightly concerned about the impact the disease has on their lives.

Meanwhile, the public is increasingly avoiding indoor meetings and the proportion of people working from home has increased.

The trends were highlighted in the latest social indicators released this morning by the Office of National Statistics, which polled people across the UK from September 24-27.

After the ascent in the summer, the levels of socializing, eating, and traveling plummeted.

Only 20 percent of adults said they met another household in a private location, compared to 30 percent in the previous week.

After lockdown restrictions were imposed in much of the north, 37 percent in areas with additional curbs said they had not met anyone outside of their own household.

In places where the lockdown hasn't increased beyond the rule of six, the number was still 22 percent.

Eight out of ten respondents said they “always or often” kept social distance when they met other people.

Mr. Khan replied and said, “This is very dangerous. Please ignore him. The government advises working from home when you can - scientists say it could save lives. "

Mr. Khan replied and said, “This is very dangerous. Please ignore him. The government advises working from home when you can – scientists say it could save lives. "

The number of people contracting coronavirus has fallen in the past week, official data showed today.

An Office for National Statistics (ONS) report released today estimated that there were 8,400 cases of the disease daily in England for the week ending September 24.

This represents a 12.5 percent decrease from the 9,600 infections believed to have occurred every day the week before.

The ONS described its results as "limited evidence" that transmission of the virus "could level off" after spiking sharply in August and September.

However, since the study is only based on a few hundred positive swabs, the government-led agency said it was too early to say the UK is not yet in the woods.

Today's ONS report is the first to report a drop in infections in the past two months after cases skyrocketed in August when the lockdown was lifted completely.

But it follows a wave of statistics yesterday suggesting that the surge in broadcasting in the UK is finally slowing down.

The government's official testing program recorded 6,914 cases yesterday, just 4.2 percent more than last Thursday. This was significant in that cases had nearly doubled every week since late August.

More evidence England's second wave is slowing down? Official data shows there are 8,400 new coronavirus cases per day compared to 9,600 last week – but the R rate in the UK has risen to 1.6 as 55 more deaths were confirmed early

The number of people infected with coronavirus has fallen in the past week, official data shows. This adds to a growing body of evidence suggesting that the UK crisis is slowing.

An Office for National Statistics (ONS) report released today estimated that there were 8,400 cases of the disease daily in England for the week ended September 24. This is a 12.5 percent decrease from the 9,600 infections believed to have occurred each day for the previous week.

The ONS described its results as "limited evidence" that transmission of the virus "may level off" after spiking sharply in August and September. However, since the study is only based on a few hundred swabs, the government-led agency said it was too early to say the UK is not in the woods yet. The ONS has sent 300,000 tests to randomly selected households across the country over the past six weeks, using the results of 400 positive smears and mathematical models to extrapolate the results to the wider population.

The estimated 8,400 daily cases signal that the UK testing regime is picking up the vast majority of cases in the country – an average of 6,000 people tested positive in the past week. Although the current number of positive tests seems high, and higher than during the peak in March and April, scientists predict that more than 100,000 people will have the virus by the spring and the tests would have taken tens of thousands every day if the same Amount of swabs was then made.

Today's study is the first to report a drop in infections in the past two months after cases skyrocketed in August when the lockdown was lifted completely. But it follows a wave of statistics yesterday suggesting that the surge in broadcasting in the UK is finally slowing down.

The government's official testing program recorded 6,914 cases yesterday, just 4.2 percent more than last Thursday. This was significant in that cases had nearly doubled every week since late August. A study by King's College in London also found that the increase in new cases every day is only 23 percent higher than last week, after more than doubling the week before.

And the government-funded REACT-1 project run by Imperial College London showed signs that the R-rate has fallen from 1.7 in September to around 1.1 and that cases are now rising less steeply than a few weeks ago.

The Government's Emergency Scientific Advisory Group (SAGE) today released its own estimates of the UK R-rate – the average number of people each Covid-19 patient infected. SAGE said the R was between 1.3 and 1.6 but warned that its data was about three weeks out of date due to the way it monitored the virus.

It comes as the UK announced 55 more coronavirus deaths in the preliminary count, including 47 in England, four in Scotland, three in Wales and one in Northern Ireland. The early toll is nearly 60 percent higher than last Friday when 35 deaths were recorded. A full update will be released today by the Ministry of Health.

An Office for National Statistics (ONS) report released today estimated that there were 8,400 cases of the disease daily in England for the week ended September 24. That's a 12.5 percent decrease from the 9,600 infections believed to have occurred each day for the week before

An Office for National Statistics (ONS) report released today estimated that there were 8,400 cases of the disease daily in England for the week ended September 24. That's a 12.5 percent decrease from the 9,600 infections believed to have occurred each day for the week before

The Government's Emergency Scientific Advisory Group (SAGE) today released its own estimates of the UK R-rate - the average number of people each Covid-19 patient infected. SAGE said the R was between 1.3 and 1.6 but warned that its data was about three weeks out of date due to the way it monitored the virus

The Government's Scientific Advisory Group on Emergencies (SAGE) today released its own estimates of the UK R-rate – the average number of people each Covid-19 patient infected. SAGE said the R was between 1.3 and 1.6 but warned that its data was about three weeks out of date due to the way it monitored the virus

The estimated 8,400 cases per day signals that the UK testing regime is picking up the vast majority of cases in the country - an average of around 6,000 people tested positive over the past week

The estimated 8,400 cases per day signals that the UK testing regime is picking up the vast majority of cases in the country – an average of around 6,000 people tested positive over the past week

It comes as the UK announced 55 more coronavirus deaths in the preliminary count, including 47 in England, four in Scotland, three in Wales and one in Northern Ireland

It comes as the UK announced 55 more coronavirus deaths in the preliminary count, including 47 in England, four in Scotland, three in Wales and one in Northern Ireland

Although the current number of positive tests seems high, and higher than during the March and April peak, scientists predict that more than 100,000 people will have contracted the virus by the spring and tests would have taken tens of thousands every day if the same Amount of swabs was then made

Obwohl die derzeitige Anzahl positiver Tests hoch zu sein scheint und höher ist als während des Höhepunkts im März und April, sagen Wissenschaftler voraus, dass im Frühjahr mehr als 100.000 Menschen an dem Virus erkrankt sind und die Tests jeden Tag Zehntausende aufgenommen hätten, wenn Die gleiche Menge an Tupfern wurde dann gemacht

Das ONS sagte, dass es in den letzten Wochen "eindeutige Beweise" für einen Anstieg der Anzahl von Personen gegeben habe, die positiv auf Covid-19 getestet wurden – aber dass es sich in den letzten sieben Tagen verlangsamt zu haben schien.

Katherine Kent, Co-Leiterin der Analyse für die Covid-19-Infektionsumfrage, sagte: „Obwohl die Beweise darauf hindeuten, dass sich die Zunahme neuer Fälle nach einem starken Anstieg im August und September abflachen könnte, ist es zu früh, um sicher zu sein diese Phase.'

COVID-19-FÄLLE FLACHEN ABER NOCH 20.000 PRO TAG, STUDIENVORHERSAGEN

Die wöchentliche Schätzung des King's College London zur Anzahl der Menschen, die in Großbritannien an Coronavirus erkranken, deutet darauf hin, dass sich das Wachstum des Ausbruchs verlangsamt, aber es gibt immer noch fast 20.000 Menschen, die sich jeden Tag infizieren.

Die Covid Symptom Study, die in Zusammenarbeit mit ZOE, einem Health-Tech-Team, das die Covid Symptom Tracker-App ausführt, durchgeführt wird, schätzt, dass derzeit in ganz Großbritannien täglich 19.777 Menschen infiziert werden.

Dies ist ein Anstieg gegenüber der Vorhersage von 16.130 täglichen Infektionen in der letzten Woche, aber der Anstieg ist geringer als zwischen den beiden vorherigen Schätzungen.

Der Anstieg vom 24. September bis zum 1. Oktober betrug 23 Prozent, während er sich zwischen dem 17. und 24. September von 7.536 mehr als verdoppelte (ein Anstieg von 114 Prozent).

Es wird angenommen, dass 14.837 dieser Fälle in England auftreten, wobei die Mehrheit im Nordosten, in Yorkshire und im Nordwesten liegt (insgesamt ungefähr 8.800).

Es wird angenommen, dass in Schottland jeden Tag weitere 2.294 Menschen krank werden, in Wales 1.331 und in Nordirland 1.315.

Die Schätzungen basieren auf den Ergebnissen von 8.377 Tupfertests. Und sie legen nahe, dass auch die Reproduktionsrate des Virus, des R, gesunken ist – auf 1,2 in England, 1,3 in Schottland und 1,4 in Wales.

Professor Tim Spector, Epidemiologe und Leiter der Studie, sagte: „Wir sind zuversichtlich, dass diese Abflachung der Daten real aussieht und dass dies ein frühes Anzeichen für eine Verlangsamung der Infektionsraten sein könnte.

"Dies mag auf eine Reihe von Faktoren zurückzuführen sein, darunter soziale Distanzierung und die" Sechserregel ", aber wir können die Rolle weniger anfälliger Menschen und die vorherige Immunität bei den Exponierten und den natürlichen Kreislauf des Virus nicht außer Acht lassen.

„Wir sehen, dass fast 50 Prozent unserer Fälle aus den unter 30-Jährigen stammen, was mehr als im Frühjahr ist, was möglicherweise erklärt, warum der Druck auf den NHS geringer ist.

„Wir müssen immer noch zusammenarbeiten, um sicherzustellen, dass diese Abflachung kein kleiner Fehler ist. Auf dem Weg in den Winter müssen wir alle vorsichtig sein und auf die Ratschläge achten, die wir in Bezug auf lokale Beschränkungen, soziale Distanzierung und die Vermeidung von Versammlungen in großen Gruppen erhalten. & # 39;

Nach Schätzungen des ONS waren zwischen dem 18. und 24. September in England rund 116.000 Menschen mit Coronavirus infiziert, was etwa einem von 500 Menschen entspricht. Das war vorbei leicht gegenüber der vorherigen Schätzung von 103.600 Menschen – rund 0,19 Prozent der Bevölkerung – für den 13. bis 19. September.

Statistiker kamen zu dieser Zahl, indem sie in den letzten sechs Wochen 291.000 Tupferergebnisse von 336 zufällig ausgewählten Mitgliedern der Öffentlichkeit analysierten, unabhängig davon, ob sie Symptome hatten oder nicht. Die Ergebnisse basierten auf 419 positiven Tests und wurden mithilfe statistischer Modelle auf die breitere Bevölkerung ausgeweitet.

Die Infektionsraten im Nordwesten und Nordosten – Heimat der größten Covid-19-Hotspots Großbritanniens – sind laut der Studie höher als im Rest der Nation.

In diesen Regionen testet ungefähr einer von 200 Menschen positiv auf das Virus – mehr als doppelt so häufig wie im Landesdurchschnitt. In Yorkshire, Humber und London beträgt die Rate 0,3 Prozent der Bevölkerung oder einer von 330.

Im Gegensatz dazu waren der Südosten, der Südwesten und der Osten Englands vom Wiederaufleben des Virus viel weniger betroffen. Im Osten erkranken 0,1 Prozent der Bevölkerung an der Krankheit – einer von tausend.

Noch weniger Menschen infizieren sich im Südosten und Südwesten, wo die Raten 0,07 bzw. 0,08 betragen.

In der letzten Woche, zwischen dem 18. und 24. September, lebten in Wales schätzungsweise 6.400 Menschen mit Coronavirus, etwa einer von 500 – die gleiche Rate in England.

Diese Woche war das erste Mal, dass das ONS Nordirland in seinem Bericht behandelte. Schätzungen zufolge haben 0,26 Prozent der Bevölkerung oder einer von 400 das Virus.

Writing in the report, statisticians from the number-crunching body, said: 'Because of the relatively small number of tests and a low number of positives in our sample, credible intervals are wide and therefore results should be interpreted with caution.'

The ONS only look at people within the community and do not account of Covid-19 carriers in hospitals, care homes or other institutional settings.

In more evidence the UK's crisis is slowing, King's College London's weekly estimate of the number of people catching coronavirus in the UK suggests that the growth of the outbreak is slowing down, but there are still nearly 20,000 people getting infected each day.

The Covid Symptom Study, run in conjunction with ZOE, a health-tech team that runs the Covid Symptom Tracker app, estimates there are now 19,777 people getting infected each day across the UK.

This is a rise from the 16,130 daily infections prediction last week but the increase is smaller than it was between the previous two estimates.

KCL collects its data by sending tests to people who report tell-tale symptoms of Covid-19 into the mobile app, while the ONS study sends tests to random households regardless of their health status.

KCL has based its latest estimates on 8,377 tests this week, of which fewer than 200 were positive.

More positive tests improves the accuracy of the data but the study may have a slight bias because it only swabs people who are already ill – which may explain why it's estimates are greater than the ONS', which also tests asymptomatic people.

KCL's rise from September 24 to October 1 was 23 per cent, while between September 17 and 24 it more than doubled from 7,536 (a 114 per cent increase).

Some 14,837 of these cases are thought to be happening in England, with the majority in the North East and Yorkshire and the North West (a total of approximately 8,800).

A further 2,294 people are thought to be getting sick each day in Scotland, along with 1,331 in Wales and 1,315 in Northern Ireland.

The estimates are based on the results of 8,377 swab tests. And they suggest that the reproduction rate of the virus, the R, has fallen, too – to 1.2 in England, 1.3 in Scotland and 1.4 in Wales.

Professor Tim Spector, an epidemiologist and leader of the KCL study, said: 'We are confident that this flattening in the data looks real and that this might be an early sign of infection rates slowing down.

'This may be due to a number of factors including social distancing and the 'rule of six', but we can't discount the role of less susceptible people and prior immunity in those exposed and the natural cycle of the virus.

'We are seeing nearly 50 per cent of our cases are coming from the under 30s, which is more than in the spring, which may explain why the pressures on the NHS are less.

'We still need to continue to work together to make sure this flattening off isn't a small blip. As we head into winter we all need to be cautious and pay attention to the advice we are being given around local restrictions, social distancing and avoiding gathering in large groups.'

Meanwhile, health bosses announced another 6,914 coronavirus cases yesterday, which gave experts hope that the virus's steep trajectory was being curtailed.

Health ministry figures show the number of daily infections this week is only 4.2 percent higher than last Thursday when 6,634 positive tests were added to the official count.

But deaths are continuing to creep up. Officials declared another 59 laboratory-confirmed Covid-19 deaths on Thursday, up 47.5 per cent on the 40 posted this time last week but down slightly on the 71 registered on Wednesday. Zum Vergleich: In den dunkelsten Wochen der ersten Welle im April starben jeden Tag mehr als 1.000 Menschen.

Although the death toll continues to rise, the data now suggests that the rising number of cases that rocked the nation in recent weeks appears to be slowing.

Although the current number of positive tests seems high, and higher than during the peak in March and April, they remain just a wave as scientists predict that more than 100,000 people will contract the virus by spring and tests will have increased by tens of thousands every day when the same amount of swabs has been made.

The results of the largest Covid-19 study in England showed that the R-rate fell from 1.7 to around 1.1

The results of the largest Covid-19 study in England showed that the R-rate fell from 1.7 to around 1.1

While the rate of infection appears to be falling, a study commissioned by the Department of Health, found that of the volunteers tested between September 18-26, one in 200 people had coronavirus.

It also revealed the virus to be spreading more among young people, while simultaneously laying bare the North-South divide, pointing to the North West as the epicentre of the UK's outbreak.

Professor Paul Elliott, director of the REACT-1 programme at Imperial from the School of Public Health, said: 'While our latest findings show some early evidence that the growth of new cases may have slowed, suggesting efforts to control the infection are working, the prevalence of infection is the highest that we have recorded to date.

"This reinforces the need for protective measures to limit the spread of the disease and public compliance with these measures. This will be vital in minimizing other significant diseases and deaths from Covid-19."

The latest Imperial College study found 55 people per 10,000 tested positive, which is an increase on 13 people per 10,000 from the previous study between August 24 and September 7.

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