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Despite the closure, traffic is on the rise: travel times in the car in London are longer


Keep Commuting: Lockdown isn't stopping Brits from going to work as rush hour traffic in major cities across the UK rises below new four-week curbs

  • London traffic on Monday was 60 percent at 8 a.m., an increase of around five percent over the same time on Thursday
  • Traffic in Newcastle and Sunderland was 40 percent yesterday morning, up from 30 percent on Thursday
  • Leeds, Bradford, Liverpool and Bristol had more cars on the streets yesterday

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Traffic in London and elsewhere in the country is increasing despite England's second lockdown.

The level in the capital was 60 percent on Monday at 8 a.m., around five percent more than on Thursday, hours after the introduction of the new lockdown.

Traffic increased elsewhere in England as well. Traffic in Newcastle and Sunderland was 40 percent yesterday morning, up from 30 percent on Thursday.

In Leeds, Bradford, Liverpool and Bristol, the number of cars on the streets was higher yesterday than it was shortly after the lockdown took effect.

Photos taken in the capital this morning also showed crowded trains on London's undergound as commuters despite the threat of Covid-19 and the government urging people to work from home when they can, theirs Driving your way to work insane.

The volume of traffic in the capital was 60 percent on Monday at 8 a.m., around five percent more than on Thursday, hours after the introduction of the new blockade

Traffic increased elsewhere in England as well. Traffic in Newcastle and Sunderland was 40 percent yesterday morning, up from 30 percent on Thursday

Traffic increased elsewhere in England as well. Traffic in Newcastle and Sunderland was 40 percent yesterday morning, up from 30 percent on Thursday

It comes after Tory MPs Transportation Secretary Grant Shapps said bike lanes and road restrictions put in place during the pandemic should be scrapped.

In a letter to the Daily Mail, the 14 backers warned that the disastrous anti-traffic measures were exacerbating stagnation and pollution, causing what they termed "tangible danger" across the country.

They said the Conservative Party was involved in a "war on motorists" and the Department of Transportation's road policy was "unacceptable" during the pandemic.

As part of the controversial policy, the councils have used taxpayers' money to give large stretches of road to pedestrians and bicycles.

In some cases, roads have been completely closed to create “low-traffic neighborhoods” in busy residential areas.

Rather than improving local areas, critics say the programs have worsened deadlocks and pollution, causing delays in 999 services and harming businesses that rely on trade from passing traffic.

Photos taken in the capital this morning also showed crowded trains on London's undergound as commuters despite the threat of Covid-19 and the government urging people to work from home when they can, theirs Driving your way to work insane

Photos taken in the capital this morning also showed crowded trains on London's undergound as commuters despite the threat of Covid-19 and the government urging people to work from home when they can, theirs Driving your way to work insane

There were more cars on the streets yesterday in Leeds, Bradford, Liverpool and Bristol than there were shortly after the lockdown took effect

There were more cars on the streets yesterday in Leeds, Bradford, Liverpool and Bristol than there were shortly after the lockdown took effect

Amazingly, some of the messiest plans were torn out after just 48 hours.

The measures have so far cost £ 400,000 a day. In a move that is likely to spark new trouble, Mr Shapps is set to release an additional £ 175 million to councils on new road systems this week.

But in a partial U-turn, he will say they cannot proceed with programs unless they can demonstrate they have the support of local residents, businesses and the region's MP.

Car groups have fought the measures for weeks, but the intervention of Tory MPs marks a major turning point in the series.

The Honorable Member's letter to Mr Shapps, authored by Tory MP Craig Mackinlay, stated: “The extra £ 250 million being spent on these projects is simply a high-priced idealistic formula for even more congestion and the associated congestion increased pollution resulting from the resulting slower movement or stationery.

“This policy is unjustifiable as our constituents are in the arms when it comes to ravaging main roads, ruining small businesses and hampering emergency services.

“With only 4 percent of road trips by bicycle, the overemphasis on bicycle initiatives and their influence on politics is counterproductive both economically and politically.

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