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David Cameron welcomes the "important" Brexit trade deal and congratulates the UK negotiating team


Former Prime Minister David Cameron today congratulated the UK negotiating team after Boris Johnson declared a Brexit deal with the European Union had been reached.

Cameron, 54, who stepped down as Prime Minister in 2016 after Britain voted to leave in the referendum he ordered, broke his silence on Twitter after the good news broke on Thursday.

He said the deal was "very welcome" and a "crucial step" in building a new relationship with the EU.

Current Prime Minister Johnson made history by staging a trade deal in record time to avoid a no-deal Brexit, which would have come into effect at the end of the January 1st transition period.

Mr Johnson said in a press conference Thursday afternoon he hoped the package would pave the way for "new stability and reassurance in a fragile relationship".

Former Prime Minister David Cameron today congratulated the UK negotiating team after Boris Johnson declared a Brexit deal with the European Union had been reached

Cameron, 54, who stepped down as Prime Minister in 2016 after Britain voted to leave in the referendum he ordered, broke his silence on Twitter after the good news broke on Thursday

Cameron, 54, who stepped down as Prime Minister in 2016 after Britain voted to leave in the referendum he ordered, broke his silence on Twitter after the good news broke on Thursday

Mr. Cameron congratulated: “It is good to end a difficult year with positive news.

“Trade deal is very welcome – and an important step in building a new relationship with the EU as friends, neighbors and partners. Congratulations to the UK negotiating team. & # 39;

Mr Cameron promised a referendum on UK membership for the first time in 2013 ahead of the 2015 general election.

After the election victory, Mr Cameron confirmed that the referendum would come after a period of renegotiating Britain's relations with the EU, in the hopes that this would help the remaining side win the referendum.

He declared in 2016 that he had negotiated an agreement that gave Britain special status and confirmed that he would work to keep Britain in the bloc.

However, after a divisive referendum in which Mr Johnson and Michael Gove, who was then Attorney General at the time, voted to support the holiday campaign, Mr Cameron fell on the loser's side.

Current Prime Minister Johnson made history by staging a trade deal in record time to avoid a no-deal Brexit, which would have come into effect at the end of the January 1st transition period

Current Prime Minister Johnson made history by staging a trade deal in record time to avoid a no-deal Brexit, which would have come into effect at the end of the January 1st transition period

Britain voted to exit on June 23, with a margin of 52 to 48 percent.

The next day, Cameron said he would resign because Britain needed "new leadership". He was then replaced by Theresa May.

A senior source number 10 said on Thursday's news: & # 39; Everything that was promised to the UK public during the 2016 referendum and last year's general election is delivered through this deal.

“We have regained control of our money, our borders, laws, trade and our fishing waters.

& # 39; The deal is fantastic news for families and businesses across the UK. We signed the first free trade agreement based on zero tariffs and zero quotas ever achieved with the EU. & # 39;

EU leader Ursula von der Leyen stated in her own briefing in Brussels that the conditions were "balanced".

& # 39; We finally reached an agreement. It's been a long and winding road, but we've got a lot to show, ”she said.

Mr Cameron promised a referendum on UK membership for the first time in 2013 ahead of the 2015 general election. He then resigned in July 2016 after the British voted to leave the bloc the previous month. Pictured: Mr Cameron with his wife Samantha and their children on the day of his retirement

Mr Cameron promised a referendum on UK membership for the first time in 2013 ahead of the 2015 general election. He then resigned in July 2016 after the British voted to leave the bloc the previous month. Pictured: Mr Cameron with his wife Samantha and their children on the day of his retirement

She said the EU had protected its single market and created "five and a half years of predictability for our fishing communities and strong incentives" so that access could continue afterwards.

Ms. von der Leyen said her overall feeling was relief. "Farewell is so sweet sorrow," she added.

Referring to one of his mantras from the conversations, Mr. Barnier said: "The clock is no longer ticking."

Irish Taoiseach Micheal Martin described the deal as the "least bad version of a possible Brexit".

The Fianna Fail leader said: "There is no such thing as a 'good Brexit' for Ireland. But we have worked hard to minimize the negative consequences."

Chancellor Angela Merkel said she was "confident" that the agreement was a "good result" as it now goes to EU member states to approve.

For French President Emmanuel Macron, who is often portrayed as a fool by British tabloids, “the unity and stability of Europe has paid off”.

Chancellor Angela Merkel pictured here described the result as "a lot".

Chancellor Angela Merkel pictured here described the result as "a lot".

Spanish Prime Minister Pedro Sanchez welcomed the news of the deal, but insisted that the Gibraltar issue was still open.

The flow of goods and people across the border may be interrupted from 11 p.m. London time on January 31, when the transitional agreement ends.

On Twitter, Sanchez wrote: "Spain and the UK are continuing the dialogue to reach an agreement on Gibraltar."

Madrid, London and Gibraltar worked out the status issues separately from the ten-month Brexit trade negotiations that finally ended the deal on Thursday.

"For us … the clock is still ticking," said Fabian Picardo, Prime Minister of Gibraltar, adding that he was "optimistic that we can reach this agreement".

A US State Department official said: “We support the UK in its sovereign decision to leave the EU and look forward to continuing close ties with both the UK and the EU.

"The United States pledges to negotiate a comprehensive free trade agreement with Great Britain."

Union leader Sir Keir Starmer said the party would vote for the government's "thin" EU deal, saying that no deal is simply not an option.

Sir Keir Starmer said Labor would back Boris Johnson's "thin" EU deal as it was better than no deal

Sir Keir Starmer said Labor would back Boris Johnson's "thin" EU deal as it was better than no deal

The passionate pro-European said it was "in the national interest" to support the deal despite concerns about the terms negotiated by the government.

Sir Keir said: "At a moment of such national importance, it is just not credible that Labor is on the sidelines.

That is why I can say today that Labor will accept this deal and vote for it when it comes to Parliament.

"But let me be absolutely clear – and say straight to the government – against no deal, we accept this deal, but the consequences of it are yours."

He said no deal would lead to "devastating" social, economic and political consequences and that it was wrong for Labor to abstain.

Number 10 said the terms meant Britain will not be on the "EU moon train".

"We are not bound by EU rules, there is no role for the European Court of Justice and all of our main red lines on the return of sovereignty have been reached," the source said.

"This means that we will have full political and economic independence on January 1, 2021."

Confirmation has been repeatedly postponed as fish for fish pages argue over the rules and Ireland warns of "problem" despite UK sources insisting there are "no major problems".

But the battle to sell the package to voters and Tory MPs is in full swing as Mr Johnson rings for troubled backers.

An internal government assessment insisted that the UK "won" 43 percent of the main problems of the £ 660 billion package, compared to 17 percent where the EU was ahead.

French President Emmanuel Macron said in the picture: "The unity and strength of Europe has paid off."

French President Emmanuel Macron said in the picture: "The unity and strength of Europe has paid off."

There will be duty-free access to the EU's single market without quotas – and Mr Johnson has retained the ability to deviate from Brussels standards without the European Court of Justice playing a role.

The document boasts that concessions have been made on rules of origin for goods, tariff tightening and "trusted trader" systems, while "isolating" the financial services sector.

A deal will also avoid major disruptions in addition to the coronavirus crisis.

However, the UK appears to have established fishing rights and provided little assistance to the service sector.

For its part, France has boasted that Mr Johnson has made "huge concessions" on fishing in recent stages as the mutated coronavirus variant has highlighted the vulnerability of Britain's borders.

The challenge facing the Prime Minister was underscored when Tory Brexiteers promised to put together a "star chamber" of experts to review the documents over Christmas.

MailOnline understands that Mr. Johnson was "very straightforward" and did not seek to make a "hard sell" when he called senior MPs.

One MP said that subject to the full text, the breakdown is "what we hoped for". "Maybe it will be a happier Christmas after all," they suggested.

Nigel Farage accused Mr Johnson of dropping the ball, but also insisted that it was progress and the Brexit war was over. There are fears that political "landmines" will inevitably be exposed in the text.

The FTSE 100 rose 20 points to 6,516 – 0.3 percent – when it opened up optimistically about a deal. The pound had already gained around 0.6 percent against the dollar and 0.4 percent against the euro overnight.

Sinn Fein President Mary Lou McDonald welcomed the agreement between the UK and the European Union.

She said: "Four and a half years ago the north of Ireland voted to stay, but despite people's wishes, it is now outside the European Union due to a Tory-inspired Brexit."

& # 39; There will be relief that a UK-EU trade agreement has now been reached and special arrangements for Ireland contained in the Irish Protocol will be implemented.

& # 39; The Good Friday Agreement has been protected, there will be no hardening of the border and protective measures are in place for the entire island economy. There is also some level of security for businesses.

"However, we are under no illusions that there is no good Brexit for Ireland in the north or south, and the full consequences of this are not yet known."

Ms. McDonald warned, "This is not the end of the road."

She said: “EU leaders have accepted Ireland's unique position and have agreed that the North will automatically become part of the EU within the framework of a United Ireland.

"So we have to start planning and talk about a future beyond Brexit."