ENTERTAINMENT

Daredevils climb homemade obstacle courses in their living rooms in a new "home bouldering" craze


We have already seen a runner running a marathon in his garden and a man reaching the high heights of Mount Everest in his own home.

But now locked-in British people are bored climbing the walls of their own house – literally.

Climbing enthusiasts who are unable to reach their favorite places or local leisure centers are setting up obstacle courses as part of a new enthusiasm, reports the Daily Telegraph today.

Known as "home bouldering", everyday objects such as Jenga blocks and wooden pallets are used to create a DIY climbing wall.

The more adventurous have even made a video for themselves of how to scale the outside of their homes.

Climbing enthusiasts who are unable to reach their favorite places or local leisure centers are setting up obstacle courses as part of a new enthusiasm. Pictured: Paris Hadjisoteriou, 28, from Nicosia in Cyprus, climbs on an arch in his house

Known as "home bouldering", everyday objects such as Jenga blocks and wooden pallets are used to create a DIY climbing wall. Pictured: Saman Shrestha, 30, from Kathmandu in Nepal, in action

Known as "home bouldering", everyday objects such as Jenga blocks and wooden pallets are used to create a DIY climbing wall. Pictured: Saman Shrestha, 30, from Kathmandu in Nepal, in action

The adventurous have even made video recordings of how they climbed the outside of their homes - including engineer Zak Aston, pictured here, how he climbed the outside of his house in Gloucestershire

The adventurous have even made video recordings of how they climbed the outside of their homes – including engineer Zak Aston, pictured here, how he climbed the outside of his house in Gloucestershire

The 29-year-old Zak climbs not only on the outside of his house, but also on parts of the inside of his house, such as B. his fireplace (picture).

The 29-year-old Zak climbs not only on the outside of his house, but also on parts of the inside of his house, such as B. his fireplace (picture).

Enthusiasm has taken social media by storm and has been picked up by both amateur and professional climbers.

29-year-old engineer Zak Aston from Littledean in Gloucestershire is one of those who filmed themselves climbing on the outside of his own house.

He posted the videos on the social media website Instagram, where they were viewed hundreds of times.

He said to the telegraph: “I think this enthusiasm has increased because climbers are a pretty eccentric bunch. We are always looking for something new to relieve the itching. & # 39;

Enthusiasm has taken social media by storm and has been picked up by both amateur and professional climbers, including Daniel James (26) from Gloucestershire, who is Go Ape's site manager

Enthusiasm has taken social media by storm and has been picked up by both amateur and professional climbers, including Daniel James (26) from Gloucestershire, who is Go Ape's site manager

Laetitia, 39, a primary school teacher from South London, is one of the participants in the trend and has created an extremely tricky climbing wall in her own home.

Laetitia, 39, a primary school teacher from South London, is one of the participants in the trend and has created an extremely tricky climbing wall in her own home.

Laetitia, 39, a primary school teacher from South London, is one of the participants in the trend and has created an extremely tricky climbing wall in her own home.

Another climber, Andy Hemsted (70) from Sutton Coldfield, West Midlands, even made the activity a fundraiser.

The three-headed grandfather climbed two flights of stairs 26 times in his house without touching the floor to raise £ 1,000 for Oxfam.

The fundraiser is one of thousands taken over by Brits who are determined to stay fit and raise money for good causes while in the coronavirus lockdown.

Andy Hemsted, 70, of Sutton Coldfield, West Midlands, even made the activity a fundraiser.

The three-headed grandfather climbed two flights of stairs 26 times in his house without touching the floor to raise £ 1,000 for Oxfam

Andy Hemsted, 70, of Sutton Coldfield, West Midlands, even made the activity a fundraiser. The three-headed grandfather climbed two flights of stairs 26 times in his house without touching the floor to raise £ 1,000 for Oxfam

John Griffin climbed 8,850 meters – the height of Mount Everest – on the stairs of his three-story semi-detached house while he was locked for only four days.

The 53-year-old, who climbed the leg with a bag of frozen peas for hours, said it was "the hardest thing he ever did."

Mr. Griffin took up the challenge of raising money for the Trussell Trust, which supports grocery banks across the UK.

A man in Kent decided to run a marathon in his garden so that he would not lose his months of training.

James Page, 36, of Sidcup, had trained for an ultra marathon and the London marathon, but both were postponed due to the coronavirus pandemic.

Mr. Page ran around his garden and changed direction every 20 minutes to protect his knees. He completed 873 laps in just under five hours.

The runner raised over £ 3,000 for children with cancer in the UK during his training, something he cares about after both parents have been diagnosed with cancer in the past 18 months.

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