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Dad with Tourette becomes a tiktok hit after showing the reality of living with the disease


A father of three living with Tourette Syndrome has become a social media star after sharing the reality of parenting in an often embarrassing state.

Guernsey-born Glen Cooney, 40, who contracted Tourette's syndrome at the age of ten following the tragic death of his cousin, decided to share videos with wife Helen, 43, and children Emma, ​​25, Daniel black comedy about family life on Tiktok to share. eight and Olly five.

His videos have gained more than 130,000 followers and document the impact of Tourette on his daily life – including dealing with tics like shouting "coronavirus" in the supermarket and copying other people's accents.

Glen says he decided to film himself with his kids to show that Tourette wasn't stopping him from being a great father.

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Father of three, Glen Cooney, 40, from Guernsey in the Channel Islands, developed Tourette's syndrome for the first time after the death of his cousin at the age of ten. Although online critics have said he shouldn't be a father, Glen has become a huge TikTok star with his videos showing the realities of his condition

In one of his most popular videos, he tries to do little things - but it's impossible to fight back throwing the ingredients at both himself and his eight-year-old son Daniel

In one of his most popular videos, he tries to do a little something – but it's impossible to fight back throwing the ingredients at both himself and his eight-year-old son Daniel

Glen looks down at the hand he just placed in the bowl of pudding as his tics dominate the trivia session at his Channel Islands home

Glen looks down at the hand he just placed in the bowl of pudding as his tics dominate the trivia session at his Channel Islands home

Since starting his channel just four weeks ago, he has already reached 100,000 followers and millions of views while connecting with other people from around the world who have the syndrome.

He said, "My latest problem is coronavirus fake sneezing and screaming in supermarkets. It happens, and when I look up, I am surrounded by people who are pulling away from me.

“I can't help the verbal and physical tics when they occur, and I haven't had the disease since I was born, so I've learned how to deal with it.

“My kids think it's pretty funny, they're not old enough to fully understand it, and they laugh when I imitate people's accents I hear in supermarkets. We've been for a curry before and when I sat down I started speaking with an Indian accent.

"Sometimes I see bald people with a lot of facial hair and I look up and shout," Your head is upside down, "as I point at them.

“It can get very embarrassing at times, but over time I've learned to accept the things I can't control and to try to live my life as openly and honestly as possible.

Sweet revenge: The family celebrated 100,000 followers on Tiktok after their videos were a huge hit on the social media platform - despite negative comments from some

Sweet revenge: The family celebrated 100,000 followers on Tiktok after their videos were a huge hit on the social media platform – despite negative comments from some

Take care of the egg! Dad Glen says his tics can happen at any time and he recently shouted "coronavirus" in supermarkets

Take care of the egg! Dad Glen says his tics can happen at any time and he recently shouted "coronavirus" in supermarkets

Glen hopes his videos will "normalize" the condition. Pictured: Glen & # 39; s wife Helen and Glen & # 39; s two youngest children, Olly, left and Daniel, right

Glen hopes his videos will "normalize" the condition. Pictured: Glen & # 39; s wife Helen and Glen & # 39; s two youngest children, Olly, left and Daniel, right

WHAT IS THE TOURETTE SYNDROME?

Tourette's syndrome is a neurological disorder that is characterized by a combination of involuntary sounds and movements called tics.

It usually starts in childhood and continues into adulthood. Tics can be either vocal or physical.

In many cases, Tourette's syndrome runs in families and is often associated with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) or attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

Tourette syndrome is named after the French doctor Georges Gilles de la Tourette, who first described the syndrome and its symptoms in the 19th century.

There is no cure for Tourette's syndrome, but treatment can help control symptoms.

Source: NHS selection

A video of himself trying to have a bite to eat with little son Daniel has proven to be one of his favorite cooking experiences, which is often problematic because Glen "will spend an hour preparing dinner and it will be me." then throw it over your head ".

In the short clip he saw him splashing pudding on his son and the kitchen wall before putting a drop of cream from dessert on his own forehead.

He explained, "When I look back on the videos that make me laugh like that, my kids are also in the sting, we're going to try and bake a cake and whisk the mixture, then I'll pour it on my head."

He is aware that the tics can upset him and says that it is often worse in public places.

“Sometimes I come home and wonder what on earth I've been doing because the stimulation outside is really scary. Not so long ago there was a man whom I cursed very loudly. He looked at me like I broke his heart. I always try to explain why I did it when I have a tic and often people listen, but the problem is that it's not subtle. I am loud and will laugh out loud.

"I even copy accents when I hear someone with a different accent and am going to sarcastically imitate them, but it's never malicious."

The infatuated father says he “learned to accept” that embarrassing things are only part of who he is

The infatuated father says he "learned to accept" that embarrassing things are only part of who he is

“I think seeing my two boys cook, play and read together proves that Tourette can't stop you from being a good father,” says Glen

He admits that his sons (Olly as a baby with big brother Daniel) sometimes can't help but laugh at their father's condition and the associated tics

He admits that his sons (Olly as a baby with big brother Daniel) sometimes can't help but laugh at their father's condition and the associated tics

“Creating these videos seems to help people, and that in turn helps me and even my children understand what I'm going through.

"They know that not only does their father do it, but that millions of people do the same."

Glen started making his TikTok videos a month ago because he was tired of the symptoms of the syndrome being false.

Two of his children can be seen in the videos, and as a result, viewers can see how adorable they are connected to each other and how they deal with the condition he has suffered from since he was ten.

"My cousin died and that's where my Tourette's journey began. It can happen to anyone and usually occurs after a traumatic incident."

I think seeing my two boys in engravings cooking, playing and reading together proves that Tourette & # 39; s is nothing that can stop you from being a good father …

Shortly after making his first TikTok video, he was amazed to see a comment saying he should never have had children because of his behavior.

Glen said, “I saw the comment and was naturally upset about it, so I filmed a response that shows how well our family is handling it.

“I think seeing my two boys cooking, playing and reading together in engravings proves that Tourette can't stop you from being a good father.

Now Glen is continuing his work on TikTok, trying to create as much positive awareness as possible about the disease.

He's even talking to a friend of his who has a speech impediment.

He said, “I think we could do some great videos together. For me, it's about normalizing people's condition.

"I will go ahead, grow my followers and hopefully show the world that this condition does not stop me from leading a full life and it should not stop anyone from doing the same."

(tagsToTranslate) Dailymail (t) Femail (t) Coronavirus (t) TikTok