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Covid UK: Vaccinated Brits are offered a vaccination certificate


How the government's vaccination schedule collapses

PHASE 1 (FEBRUARY 15 TARGET)

CARE HOME RESIDENTS – 300,000

CARE HOME WORKERS – 500,000

AGE 80+ – 3,300,000

HEALTH WORKERS – 2,400,000

SOCIAL CAREER – 1,400,000

Age 75-79 – 2,300,000

AGE 70-74 – 3,200,000

CLINICAL EXTREMELY VULNERABLE (UNDER 70) – 1,200,000

PHASE 2 (SPRING)

65-69 2,900,000

AT RISK BELOW 65 7,300,000

60-64 1,800,000

55-59 2,400,000

50-54 2,800,000

PHASE 3 (AUTUMN)

REST OF ADULT POPULATION 21,000,000

Thousands of Britons who have already received their coronavirus sting will be offered vaccination records in a trial this month after ministers turned the controversial policy upside down.

The pass, created by biometrics firm iProov and cybersecurity firm Mvine, is issued as a free app and allows users to digitally prove whether they had their first or second bump – or none at all.

Although the Department of Health said there were "no plans" to introduce vaccination records, state science and research funding agency Innovate UK has already pumped £ 75,000 into the project.

Frank Joshi, director of Mvine, said the company, which had started working on the passports to demonstrate the test results, later received more funding to switch to the vaccination record.

The government-sponsored process is overseen by two public health directors in the local authorities and is expected to last through March – until the third national lockdown.

However, the locations have yet to be agreed, according to Telegraph.

The study aims to show how the passports can be used to help the NHS track the number of people who received their first or second push.

Andrew Bud, head of iProov, told the newspaper, "We're talking about a remarkable technology that can be brought to fruition and easily incorporated into the NHS."

Both companies added that if the vaccination records are successful, the project could roll out to millions of people across the country.

A health ministry spokesman said, "With large numbers of people from high-risk groups being vaccinated, we can gather evidence to support the impact on infection rates, hospitalization and the reduction in deaths. If successful, it should, over time, lead to a reassessment of the current restrictions. & # 39;

The government objected to the introduction of vaccination certificates. Michael Gove said they were "not the plan" while Boris Johnson's vaccine czar Nadhim Zahawi said they were "looking at the technology".

Mr Zahawi later told a debate in Westminster Hall about vaccination with Covid-19 that there were "absolutely no plans for vaccination pass" and said "Vaccinations are discriminatory and completely wrong".

Health Secretary Matt Hancock also turned down plans to introduce passports last week, telling the viewer, "It's not an area we're looking at."

Politicians have raised concerns that the passports could discriminate against people who are not allowed to be vaccinated, such as pregnant women. Others fear that unvaccinated Brits could be under house arrest until they get a sting.

The idea of ​​introducing vaccination certificates has already been implemented in Europe. The Greek ministers propose that EU countries introduce a “standardized” vaccination record to encourage travel and stimulate industry.

In a letter to the EU Commission chief Ursula von der Leyen, the Greek Prime Minister Kyriakos Mitsotakis suggested: “Vaccinated people should be able to travel freely.

"There is an urgent need to develop a common understanding of how a vaccination record should be structured so that it is accepted in all Member States."

If the EU decides to make vaccination certificates compulsory, this could exclude unvaccinated Britons from holidays on the continent.

The governments of Estonia, Hungary, Iceland, Spain, Denmark and Belgium have all indicated that they would support such a system – although the idea already raises privacy and data sharing concerns.

Meanwhile, Boris Johnson clashed with NHS leaders over the pace of the UK vaccination program, accusing "excessive bureaucracy" of slowing adoption.

It is because No. 10 is considering tightening the third national lockdown by imposing Chinese-style curfews, outdoor mask mandates, and 10-foot social distancing – as well as kindergarten closings and movement restrictions.

In other coronavirus developments:

  • Bank of England Governor Andrew Bailey warned about vacation masks unemployment, and the actual rate could be 6.5 percent, not 4.9 percent.
  • The government is facing increased pressure to run the vaccination program around the clock and put more staff on the front lines.
  • Matt Hancock has denied there is a national oxygen starvation as the burden on the NHS mounts, but approved patients may need to be moved to where supplies are available.
  • Every third death in England and Wales in the last few days of 2020 was related to the coronavirus. Official figures revealed that a separate analysis found the virus to be behind the sharpest surge in deaths since 1940.
  • Downing Street has admitted that images of the random content in some free grocery packets for school lunches are "totally unacceptable" after the issue was highlighted by Marcus Rashford.
  • Seven vaccination centers have been opened, including London's ExCeL and Birmingham Millennium Point.
  • Derbyshire Police have canceled a £ 200 fine for two women fined for driving five miles to go for a walk.
  • Almost a quarter of nursing home residents have received their first shot of a Covid vaccine. Almost 2.7 million doses are now administered across the UK.
  • Hospitals began rationing oxygen when it was found that every fourth coronavirus patient is under 55 years old.

Moira Edwards receives an injection of the Oxford / AstraZeneca Covid-19 vaccine at the NHS Vaccine Mass Injection Center set up on the Epsom Race Course in Surrey

The government objected to the introduction of vaccination records. Michael Gove said they were "not the plan" while Boris Johnson's Vaccine Tsar Nadhim Zahawi (pictured in parliament) said they were "looking at the technology".

The government objected to the introduction of vaccination certificates. Michael Gove said they were "not the plan" while Boris Johnson's Vaccine Tsar Nadhim Zahawi (pictured in parliament) said they were "looking at the technology".

Mvine director and founder Frank Joshi

iProov boss Andrew Bud

Mvine's director and founder Frank Joshi (left) said the company had started working on the passports to demonstrate the test results, but had received more funding to switch to vaccination passports. iProov chief Andrew Bud (right) said, "We're talking about a remarkable technology that can be brought to fruition and easily incorporated into the NHS."

We had the right to reject the EU vaccination system, MEPs are told

The UK's decision to opt out of the EU vaccination system has resulted in MEPs administering more Covid shocks than the rest of Europe combined.

Figures show that the UK ranks fourth in the world after Israel, the United Arab Emirates and Bahrain with 4.19 per 100 people.

This corresponds to 0.21 per 100 inhabitants in France, 0.82 in Germany, with Denmark being the closest EU nation with 2.02. Former Vaccination Czar Kate Bingham told MPs that the decision to go it alone meant we were now in an "advanced position" compared to other countries.

She told the Commons Public Accounts Committee that the EU rules would put an end to the ongoing negotiations with AstraZeneca. Ms. Bingham, former Chair of the UK Vaccine Taskforce, said: "We felt that the terms were too tight and that we could actually act faster if we did so independently."

In July, officials decided not to join the EU vaccination system as this meant they had no say in any decision, including pricing or which manufacturers to negotiate with them.

The UK has so far signed supply contracts for seven different vaccines totaling 367 million doses for at least £ 3.7 billion.

After purchasing 300 million doses of Pfizer vaccine, supply chain problems have hampered vaccine adoption in the EU.

Meanwhile, an additional 165,000 vaccines were launched yesterday. This is evident from official figures, which are under increasing pressure on No. 10 to conduct a round-the-clock rollout.

With the successful launch of a stab, the government's only hope of ever easing the endless cycle of lockdowns, pressure is mounting on Mr Johnson to pull out all the stops to make sure the NHS operation works.

And vaccination – the largest in British history – picked up speed after Oxford's groundbreaking push was approved.

Home Secretary Priti Patel announced that 2.43 million people have now received their first dose, up from 2.29 million yesterday. Another 20,000 second doses were also added to the cumulative total for a total of 2.8 million shots.

However, the daily vaccination count will have to double if the Prime Minister has a chance to deliver on his promise to vaccinate all 13.9 million Britons in the top four priority groups by February 15.

Only 34 days to fulfill his promise to end the lockdown, around 11.5 million people over 70, NHS employees, residents and nursing homes of nursing homes, and adults with underlying diseases still need to be vaccinated – the equivalent of around 340,000 per day.

The government is under increasing pressure to distribute coronavirus vaccines around the clock. Labor said No. 10 must "deliver for the British people" because the public "has sacrificed so much".

Ministers have claimed there is no shouting for appointments after 8 p.m. However, Nicola Sturgeon hinted that if it would "help us get through faster", Scotland could have a 24/7 program.

Meanwhile, Secretary of Defense Ben Wallace told the Commons that military personnel "can do more to help" as he suggested the stalemate was due to stock shortages and supply chain problems.

He added, “I could vaccinate all 100,000 soldiers tomorrow, but if the stock isn't there we'll have people who don't … we could keep them busy.

"We are very, very clear that we can do more to help. The Prime Minister knows this and the Prime Minister has announced that we will be called upon as the NHS is asking."

Announcing the new vaccine numbers at today's Downing Street press conference, Ms Patel said vaccination centers are following Covid's guidelines to ensure they are safe for staff and visitors who receive bumps.

She said, "The booths are wide apart and we are working with PHE and following all guidelines regarding the safety and security measures required for staff in these centers, as well as those who come in for immunization. "

Dr. Vin Diwakar, Medical Director of the NHS in London added, "We have absolutely strict standards for controlling infection prevention in all of these vaccine centers."

Ms. Patel also said the government is considering prioritizing frontline workers for the coronavirus vaccine once the most vulnerable groups get the sting.

She added: "We are looking at those who are on the front lines, such as police officers, teachers and others, who are by their very nature professional at risk of exposure to the virus.

"We are absolutely working to get the vaccine to them, but that means working with the JCVI."

Labor vice chair Angela Rayner put more pressure on Downing Street to make the vaccination program work around the clock.

Home Secretary Priti Patel announced that 2.43 million people have now received their first dose, up from 2.29 million yesterday. Another 20,000 second doses were also added to the cumulative total

Home Secretary Priti Patel announced that 2.43 million people have now received their first dose, up from 2.29 million yesterday. Another 20,000 second doses were also added to the cumulative total

Nicola Sturgeon hit Mr Johnson again by announcing that Scotland was planning to sell vaccines day and night, but acknowledged that supplies were still "relatively limited".

Defense Secretary Ben Wallace said the army could "do more to help".

Nicola Sturgeon hit Mr Johnson again by announcing that Scotland was planning to sell vaccines day and night, but admitted that supplies were still "relatively limited". Defense Secretary Ben Wallace said the army could "do more to help".

Members of the public come to receive their injection of a Covid-19 vaccine at the NHS Vaccine Center set up in the Center for Life in Times Square in Newcastle

Members of the public come to receive their injection of a Covid-19 vaccine at the NHS Vaccine Center set up in the Center for Life in Times Square in Newcastle

Retirees are asked to travel from Greater Manchester to Birmingham, Telford and Newcastle for their vaccinations.

Retirees are said to be traveling from Greater Manchester to vaccination sites in Telford, Macclesfield, Halifax and Newcastle to receive their Covid puffs, according to local reports.

Some of the most vulnerable people eligible for the vaccine have been referred to hubs outside of Greater Manchester as UK mass vaccination continues.

Numerous people have told the Manchester Evening News that they have been invited to travel around the country to receive it.

In some cases, patients have received two invitations – one from their local health care provider and one from teams introducing the sting at one of seven national vaccination centers.

NHS chiefs said people don't have to accept invitations to vaccinate at the larger centers and "can instead be bumped into one of their local vaccination centers in the coming weeks".

She said: “The British people have sacrificed so much, now the government must deliver for the British people. The Prime Minister must use this lockdown to develop a 24/7 vaccination program that is available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. "

The aim is for every Briton over 50 to be offered a Covid bite by the end of April.

However, doubts have been expressed about the target, numbering around 2.8 million as of yesterday, and calls for frontline workers such as teachers and police officers to be placed on the priority list.

Ms. Sturgeon was asked about running a 24-hour vaccination program when she confirmed a total of 175,942 had received their first vaccine dose by Monday.

She said, "We will look at anything that will allow us to get this vaccination program through as soon as possible."

Ms. Sturgeon said vaccine supplies are still "relatively limited" and that these groups are "unsuitable for out-of-hours vaccinations" as the current focus is on bringing shocks to nursing home residents and those over 80.

In response to John Healey, the Secretary of Defense told the Commons: "We are of course, as he knows, incredibly interested and eager to offer any assistance we can."

Mr. Wallace added, "And of course, all members of the armed forces can help the government with its resilience and defense – that is obviously the purpose of their job."

Regarding vaccinations, he continued: “Of course tomorrow I could use all 100,000 soldiers to vaccinate, but if the stock is not there, we have no people … we could employ them better.

“So we're very, very interested in the government, the Prime Minister is determined to make sure we hit both the pace of warehouse delivery and the pace of delivery into people's arms – the stabbing.

"And we are very, very clear that we can do more to help. The Prime Minister knows this and the Prime Minister has announced that we will be asked, as the NHS is asking."

It came after desperate shift workers and teachers came forward saying they would love to come day and night to get the coronavirus vaccine.

Disgruntled workers used social media to blow up the Prime Minister's claim that there was "no yelling" for nightly bumps.

One wrote: “I work in shifts. I'm awake when most of the country is asleep. So I'm happy to have my vaccine anytime. & # 39;

Desperate shift workers and teachers have spoken out that they would like to come day and night to get the coronavirus vaccine after Boris Johnson insisted there is no "noise" for appointments after 8pm

Desperate shift workers and teachers have spoken out that they would like to come day and night to get the coronavirus vaccine after Boris Johnson insisted there is no "noise" for appointments after 8pm

An aerial drone shows the tennis and football center on the Etihad campus in Manchester, which is used as a mass vaccination center for Covid

An aerial drone shows the tennis and football center on the Etihad campus in Manchester, which is used as a mass vaccination center for Covid

Dozens of elderly people line up outside the Hornchurch Library in the Havering borough of London to get their Covid-19 vaccine

Dozens of elderly people line up outside the Hornchurch Library in the Havering borough of London to get their Covid-19 vaccine

The minister has promised to distribute 2 million shocks a week in 2,700 centers across the country by the end of January. The map shows the locations that are currently in operation, including seven mass centers (green), more than 100 hospitals (blue), and general practitioners' offices and pharmacies (purple).

The minister has promised to distribute 2 million shocks a week in 2,700 centers across the country by the end of January. The map shows the locations that are currently in operation, including seven mass centers (green), more than 100 hospitals (blue), and general practitioners' offices and pharmacies (purple).

Boris Johnson "clashed with NHS leaders over excessive red tape that slowed vaccine adoption"

Boris Johnson argued violently with NHS leaders over the pace of the UK's mass vaccination program when he blamed "excessive bureaucracy" for slowing adoption.

Officials said the Prime Minister briefed NHS England chief Sir Simon Stevens of the riot last week in a series of "tough" talks as the government came under pressure to end the lockdown cycle.

Downing Street and the NHS said relations have improved since then as the No. 10 is now trying to speed up adoption by approving a 24/7 vaccine center.

Tensions between Sir Simon and Mr. Johnson had eased since before Christmas when the Prime Minister feared that some non-frontline NHS staff had been vaccinated before people aged 80 and over.

One person briefed on the clash alleged that Mr Johnson invited Brigadier Phil Prosser, who heads the Army's vaccine task force, to a press conference on Downing Street last week to warn Sir Simon that the military had a major one Role in the program would get if not the role-out was sped up.

However, NHS insiders told the FT that Sir Simon Brig had proposed Prosser's attendance at the conference and denied allegations of tension with the Prime Minister. No10 also denied there was tension, adding, "It's a really good relationship."

Another user, a teacher, said, “If this were to speed things up and I wasn't taking a vaccine from someone who is more susceptible, I would love to go any time of the day or night.

“I am a 60 year old teacher who works in school and is afraid for me and my older, vulnerable husband. Of course I would go! & # 39;

Another Twitter user said: “I would scream at any time of the night! As a teacher, I am still at school during the day and look after important working-class children. I would love a vaccine and after 8 p.m. I would be perfect!

“I'm pretty sure the rest of the staff would agree. Log in! & # 39;

And another wrote: “You do this in New York and my teacher friends who are my age, 35, got their vaccine today. I am also a teacher and have absolutely no vaccine evidence for me.

"I would take a vaccine anytime to get back into the classroom!"

Tory MPs are urging ministers to "carefully examine" whether working hours can be extended, while some said there is "no excuse why it shouldn't be around the clock".

Another Twitter user wrote, "I work shifts so 9-5 is not good for me, I would have the vaccine anytime."

But while Health Secretary Matt Hancock said last night the NHS "will do whatever it takes," he downplayed the prospect of around-the-clock surgery, saying people would prefer to get shocks during the day.

And in the House of Commons, Vaccination Minister Nadhim Zahawi said this will not happen in the first phase, when the four most vulnerable groups are targeted, as staff would end up "standing around and waiting".

"If we went to a 24-hour regimen, it would be a lot harder to target the vaccine to these four cohorts," he said.

“Of course, if we only have a limited vaccination volume, we don't want staff standing around waiting for people in centers that are open 24/7.

“Also, many of these people are over 80 years old, and we go to nursing homes to vaccinate the residents of those homes.

"The decision to go from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. was made because we want to make sure there is even distribution and very close alignment."

Former Secretary Steve Baker, a chairman of the CRG group of Tory MPs, told MailOnline the government needs to "look carefully" into extending working hours.

"The sooner the vulnerable are vaccinated, the sooner we can end these destructive cycles of lockdowns and restrictions," he said.

"Therefore, the government should carefully investigate all practical problems of 24/7 operations and address them if that would help to achieve the necessary goals."

Tory MP Henry Smith said the vaccine rollout has gone well so far, adding, “There's no excuse why it shouldn't be around the clock. This is a national emergency, and every hour lost damages our economy, our future, our finances and our health.

& # 39; We cannot lose a moment. I do not make international comparisons … but the fact that Israel was able to vaccinate most of the population – it could be faster. & # 39;

Another Tory MP suggested to MailOnline that soon the government should try to extend hours to 6 a.m. and 10 p.m. to increase the daily number of bumps.

But they said "the supply is not yet coming in the quantities needed from the manufacturers" to move on to extended opening hours.

At a briefing on Downing Street last night, Mr. Hancock was asked for comments from the Prime Minister's spokesman that there was no "clamor" for a 24/7 vaccination model.

He said, “We will do this when it is necessary. We will do absolutely everything to get this vaccine in place as soon as possible.

"The thing is, if both the person vaccinating and the person being vaccinated would prefer it to be done in the middle of the day rather than the middle of the night, then we should probably do it."

He said there would be some groups where a 24/7 model might be the best approach, but added, "Our attitude towards the vaccine rollout is all that is required to make it as quickly and safely as possible to do."

Stephen Powis, a professor at NHS England, said working through the day was the most "efficient" use of staff and volunteers.

Professor Powis added, “I'm sure the vast majority of people would prefer to have their vaccine during the day.

"And the best of our staff and volunteers … working during the day is the most efficient way to get the most vaccine out."

Mask defects in tubes, buses and trains are punished with a fine: Warning of the police chief – as Priti Patel warns of a harsh regime with rule violations

Police warned tonight that anyone who does not wear a face mask on public transport will be fined as Priti Patel supports even tougher crackdown on lockdown violations.

Martin Hewitt, chairman of the council of police chiefs, said officials would no longer waste time arguing with lockdown skeptics as deaths continue to rise from the latest coronavirus deadly wave.

At a press conference on Downing Street, he gave examples of shocking "irresponsible behavior" by people who ignored warnings – even if more than 1,200 people died daily.

These included a £ 30 a head boat party in Hertfordshire with over 40 people, a house party in Surrey that the host tried to pretend it was a business event, and a minibus full of people from different households heading for a trip from Cheltenham were caught going to Wales.

The Home Secretary, who stood next to Mr. Hewitt, said a minority of the public was "endangering the health of the nation" when she supported the police's stricter approach to lockdown rules.

She warned officials would be quicker to impose fines if people clearly violate coronavirus regulations. Nearly 45,000 fixed criminal charges have been issued across the UK since March.

It comes as No10 is considering imposing Chinese-style mask mandates, curfews, and 10 feet of social distancing to tighten the shutdown under pressure from scientists and Sir Keir Starmer to get tougher.

Mr. Hewitt said: “Organizing parties or other large gatherings is dangerous, selfish and completely irresponsible in the face of the current threat to which we are exposed. Organizers will be punished. But also the people who choose to take part.

„Es ist gefährlich, in einem Bus oder Zug keine Gesichtsbedeckung zu tragen. Es gefährdet das Leben anderer Reisender, einschließlich jener kritischen Arbeitnehmer, die weiterhin öffentliche Verkehrsmittel nutzen müssen, um ihre wichtige Arbeit zu erledigen. Wenn Sie auf diesen Systemen nicht davon ausgenommen sind, können Sie mit einer Geldstrafe rechnen. & # 39;

Er forderte die Menschen auf, persönliche Verantwortung für ihre Handlungen zu übernehmen, und fügte hinzu: „Wir werden mit den Menschen sprechen und sie erklären. Aber ich denke, die Regeln sind klar genug, damit die Leute verstehen, wir sind 10 Monate in diesem Prozess. & # 39;

Frau Patel sagte, "viel zu oft" gefährden Polizisten ihre Gesundheit und ihr Leben, indem sie "in engen Kontakt mit Menschen kommen, einschließlich derer, die die Existenz von Coronaviren leugnen, um uns alle zu schützen". Sie fügte hinzu: „Wir befinden uns jetzt in einem kritischen Stadium unseres Kampfes gegen dieses Virus.

"Um diejenigen zu schützen, die Ihnen wichtig sind, und die Fähigkeit unserer Krankenhäuser, uns alle zu schützen, bleiben Sie bitte zu Hause, um den NHS zu schützen und Leben zu retten."

Frau Patel bestand darauf, dass die Coronavirus-Regeln, denen die Menschen folgen müssen, klar sind.

Auf die Frage, warum die Vorschriften trotz der schwierigen Situation des NHS nicht so streng seien wie die erste Sperre, erklärte der Innenminister auf einer Pressekonferenz in der Downing Street: „Die Regeln sind eigentlich sehr einfach und klar.

"Wir sollen zu Hause bleiben und das Haus nur aus einer sehr, sehr begrenzten Anzahl von Gründen verlassen."

Erholung im Freien war "auf sehr, sehr eingeschränkte und begrenzte Weise erlaubt, lokal zu bleiben". Sie fügte hinzu, die Polizei habe "die Art der ungeheuren Verstöße dargelegt, gegen die wir vorgehen werden".

Priti Patel unterstützte ein hartes Vorgehen gegen Regelverstöße während des dritten nationalen Lockdowns

Martin Hewitt, Vorsitzender des Rates der Nationalen Polizeichefs, hat Regelverstöße, die die Sicherheit anderer nicht berücksichtigen, gesprengt, als er einige der Situationen umriss, denen sich die Polizei gegenübersehen musste

Priti Patel unterstützte ein hartes Vorgehen gegen Regelverstöße während des dritten nationalen Lockdowns. Polizeichef Martin Hewitt hat Regelverstöße gesprengt, die die Sicherheit anderer nicht berücksichtigen, als er einige der Situationen umriss, denen sich Polizisten gegenübersehen mussten

Boris Johnson (im Kabinett abgebildet) steht unter dem Druck von Mitgliedern des wissenschaftlichen Beirats von Sage, die soziale Distanzierungslücke zu vergrößern

Boris Johnson (im Kabinett abgebildet) steht unter dem Druck von Mitgliedern des wissenschaftlichen Beirats von Sage, die soziale Distanzierungslücke zu vergrößern

In der Waterloo Station waren bewaffnete Polizisten im Einsatz, da die Regierung erwägt, die Sperrregeln erneut zu verschärfen

In der Waterloo Station waren bewaffnete Polizisten im Einsatz, da die Regierung erwägt, die Sperrregeln erneut zu verschärfen

Welche Supermarktbestimmungen gelten jetzt und wann haben sie sich geändert?

Sainsbury's

Gesichtsmasken sind im Geschäft obligatorisch, es sei denn, der Käufer ist medizinisch vom Tragen befreit. Wachen am Eingang setzen die Regeln durch.

Es gibt auch Sicherheitsgitter aus Kunststoff, Händedesinfektionsmittel und Schilder, die die Kunden auffordern, sich sozial zu distanzieren.

Das Geschäft verfügt auch über zeitgesteuerte Slots für ältere oder schutzbedürftige Personen, um ihre Waren zu kaufen.

Der Laden teilte MailOnline mit, dass während der gesamten Pandemie Wachen anwesend gewesen seien, aber mehr an Läden geschickt worden seien, die "zusätzliche Hilfe brauchten".

Morrisons

Morrisons hat den Wachen gesagt, sie sollen Käufern, die keinen medizinischen Grund haben, keine Gesichtsmaske zu tragen, den Zutritt verweigern.

Einige Geschäfte hatten während der Pandemie Wachen, aber diese wurden an allen Orten eingeführt.

Sie haben auch einen spezialisierten Lieferservice am nächsten Tag für diejenigen, die nicht persönlich in ein Geschäft kommen können.

Der Laden hat auch eine NHS-Prioritätszeit, in der die wichtigsten Mitarbeiter Lebensmittel kaufen können.

Tesco

Tesco verbot zusammen mit Sainsbury's und Morrisons Kunden ohne Maske und setzte Sicherheitspersonal ein, um die Regeln durchzusetzen.

Das Geschäft teilte MailOnline mit, dass Sicherheitspersonal während der gesamten Pandemie Geschäfte besucht hatte, aber jetzt wurden weitere eingestellt.

It also has priority hours for key workers as well as limits on some items for delivery.

Marks & Spencer

M&S has hand sanitising as well as one-way systems in place and a facemask rule.

Larger shops have restricted the purchase of non-essential goods.

There is also a booking process to let people reserve a slot instore to go shopping. MailOnline has contacted M&S, and all the stores listed below, for their current arrangements as well as if and when they changed.

Asda

Asda, like others, has a rule for facemasks unless there is a medical exemption announced by the customer.

They also have an app that lets shoppers wait in a digital queue in their cars for a slot to go instore.

Asda also say they have put a protective film on basket and trolley grips that kills bacteria.

Waitrose

Waitrose says facemasks must be worn in its stores unless a person is exempted from not wearing one.

Marshals are at the entrances to its stores to check people are wearing mask and are shopping alone.

Floor-markers help customers to follow social distancing while people are asked to keep two metres in queues.

Earlier Metropolitan Police Commissioner Cressida Dick insisted officers would come to the aid of supermarket staff if shoppers became 'aggressive' after being told to wear a mask after police warned they did not have enough manpower to enforce the rules.

Sainsbury's, Morrisons, Tesco, Asda, Waitrose and M&S have now reintroduced bouncers at the door in all stores to ensure customers are wearing face coverings and socially distancing.

Meanwhile, John Lewis announced it would scrap click and collect for new orders from tomorrow, although it will still run at Waitrose for food orders.

West Yorkshire Police Federation chairman Brian Booth this morning warned that there were not enough officers to 'stand in every store' and it was up to the supermarkets themselves to enforce the rules.

But speaking later, Dame Cressida said her officers would be prepared to assist supermarket staff if customers became 'obstructive and aggressive' when they were told they must wear a face covering. She also said it was 'preposterous' people couldn't know rules as vowed to continue wider crackdown.

Bouncers were in place at the start of the first lockdown in March to enforce social distancing and the wearing of face coverings, but began to vanish as the threat posed by Covid-19 waned during the summer, leading to an increasingly 'lax' attitude from shoppers who were increasingly seen maskless.

But as alarm bells were sounded by Downing Street and scientists warned that shops were contributing to the rise in cases, the Big Four supermarkets returned to the previous, stricter arrangement.

Mr Booth said officers would only intervene if 'other offences were committed', such as when the customer refusing to wear a mask became violent or abusive.

'If there is an ongoing crime, an assault or danger to someone that must be the priority but we just don't have the resources to stand at every supermarket,' he told BBC Radio 4's Today programme.

It came as Boris Johnson gathered his Cabinet after warning he could further strengthen the restrictions if people continued flouting the law – as ministers defended his controversial decision to go cycling in the Olympic Park, seven miles from Downing Street.

Meanwhile, the mask crackdown ran into problems as some shoppers continued refusing to follow the rules, despite the vast majority complying with them.

Mayor of London Sadiq Khan tweeted: 'Don't get caught out when you're at the supermarket — remember always to take a face mask with you when you're leaving your home. Wear it on the way to the shop and in the queue as well. We need to be doing everything we can to slow the spread of the virus.'

Shoppers arriving at Morrisons in Peckham, south London, were greeted by a security guard who instructed them to put on their masks or they would not be allowed inside.

A woman who came without her mask was warned that if she did not put it on, she would not be allowed to continue her shop.

The woman, who only gave her first name Gladys, said: “I had a mask with me, but I just forgot it. I've come to the supermarket many times and haven't put it on, but I think it's good that they enforce this. & # 39;

But after Gladys put on her mask, she lowered it under her mouth as she continued with her business. She said, “I find it too uncomfortable. I don't understand what the fuss is, I have a mask on, it just doesn't cover my nose and mouth at the moment. & # 39;

When Gladys was shopping in the store, she wasn't challenged as to how she wore her mask.

Shoppers were pictured without face masks at a series of supermarkets, including Asda, Morrisons and Tesco in London, Leeds and Swindon.

Supermarkets may be the most common place where people in England are exposed to the coronavirus, official data suggests.

When asked about the crackdown, a shopper at a Morrisons in Peckham, south-east London said: 'It's about time.

A maskless shopper seen in a Morrisons in Peckham, south-east London. The woman, who only gave her first name of Gladys, said: 'I had a mask with me but simply forgot'

A maskless shopper seen in a Morrisons in Peckham, south-east London. The woman, who only gave her first name of Gladys, said: 'I had a mask with me but simply forgot'

A shopper in Morrisons, Leeds, not wearing a mask

A shopper in Morrisons in Leeds not wearing a mask (left) and another at an Asda in Swindon (right). It is not clear if the customers pictured have valid medical exemptions

Customers not wearing masks at an Asda in Swindon. It is not clear if the customer on the pictured had a medical exemption

Customers not wearing masks at an Asda in Swindon

Customers not wearing masks at an Asda in Swindon. There are various exemptions from having to wear a face mask – it is unclear if any of these apply to the customer seen on the left

A Morrisons customer posted on social media to complain about being allowed into a store in Colwyn Bay for failing to wear a mask

A customer leaving a store in London

A Morrisons customer posted on social media to complain about being allowed into a store in Colwyn Bay for failing to wear a mask (left). Pictured on the right is a customer leaving a store in London

'A lot of people are going to supermarkets and simply ignoring the rules. I don't know why it's taken Morrisons this long to start enforcing this rule.

'We're living in very difficult times and we've all got to pull together to beat this virus.'

A second, who refused to give her name, did not have a mask covering her nose. She said: 'What's the problem I've got a mask on haven't I?

'I find it difficult to breathe when I've got a mask on and sometimes get a rash.

'I think it's good to enforce the rule but they've got to understand that for some people, masks are very uncomfortable.'

The store's security guard, who did not want to give his name, said: 'We've been given strict instructions about masks. If you've not got one on, you're not getting in. It's as simple as that.'

The security guard added that they had not been challenging customers who were without masks.

He added: 'It wasn't our responsibility to enforce it and we were told to call the police, which we never did.

'This is going to create more problems for us because my concern is that some people will not want to wear a mask and will fight with us over it. So far, we've not had many problems.'

Despite several instances of rule-breaking, most shoppers at supermarkets visited by MailOnline were wearing masks.

During the first shutdown, supermarkets installed bouncers at store entrances to challenge rule-breakers and created in-store one-way systems to help people socially distance.

MailOnline has asked all major supermarkets if they plan to follow Sainsbury's and Morrisons in reintroducing bouncers.

Buyers of a Tesco Extra in south east London this morning. The rules state that masks must be worn over the nose and mouth

Buyers of a Tesco Extra in south east London this morning. The rules state that masks must be worn over the nose and mouth

A security guard on duty at the entrance to a Morrisons in Leeds, where most customers were following the face mask guidance

A security guard on duty at the entrance to a Morrisons in Leeds, where most customers were following the face mask guidance

A security guard speaks to customers entering a Sainsbury's store in Swindon on day one of the new mask crackdown

A security guard speaks to customers entering a Sainsbury's store in Swindon on day one of the new mask crackdown

Sainsbury's CEO Simon Roberts sent this email to all customers this morning to inform them about the new enforcement measures

Sainsbury's CEO Simon Roberts sent this email to all customers this morning to inform them about the new enforcement measures

The distance was set at two metres in March after experts said coronavirus was up to ten times more transmissible at one metre than at two. Now experts want the public to maintain the distance on public transport, in supermarket lines and while out and about

The distance was set at two metres in March after experts said coronavirus was up to ten times more transmissible at one metre than at two. Now experts want the public to maintain the distance on public transport, in supermarket lines and while out and about

What are the government's rules on taking exercise?

You should minimise time spent outside your home, but you can leave your home to exercise.

This should be limited to once per day, and you should not travel outside your local area.

You can exercise in a public outdoor place:

  • by yourself
  • with the people you live with
  • with your support bubble (if you are legally permitted to form one)
  • in a childcare bubble where providing childcare
  • or, when on your own, with one person from another household

This includes but is not limited to running, cycling, walking, and swimming.

Personal training can continue one-on-one unless everyone is within the same household or support bubble.

Public outdoor places include:

  • parks, beaches, countryside accessible to the public, forests
  • public gardens (whether or not you pay to enter them)
  • the grounds of a heritage site
  • playgrounds

Britain's policing minister Kit Malthouse this morning said police would intervene in serious breaches of Covid rules in shops, but measures imposed and enforced by owners would be effective in most cases.

Brian Booth, chair of West Yorkshire Police Federation, said officers would only intervene if 'other offences were committed', such as when the customer refusing to wear a mask became violent or abusive.

'If there is an ongoing crime, an assault or danger to someone that must be the priority but we just don't have the resources to stand at every supermarket,' he told BBC Radio 4's Today programme.

Mr Booth also criticised the current regulations as 'woolly', saying they left too many 'loose ends' which 'cheesed-off' officers had to interpret for themselves.

He suggested that the much-publicised fining of two walkers in Derbyshire was correct according to the guidance.

'An officer issued a ticket in the spirit it was written,' told the Today programme. Normally in law, when you have a new law it is disputed and goes to the court where it is argued and becomes case law.

'But we don't have time for that, so what we need is a sound basis in law and we need it now, rather than leaving loose ends.'

It came as Met Police Commissioner Cressida Dick said it was 'preposterous' that people would not know the Covid rules, and vowed to continue fining lawbreakers.

Writing in the Times, Dame Cressida said: 'It is preposterous to me that anyone could be unaware of our duty to do all we can to stop the spread of the virus.

'We have been clear that those who breach Covid-19 legislation are increasingly likely to face fines.

'We will still be engaging, explaining and encouraging but those who break the rules or refuse to comply where they should without good reason will find officers moving much more quickly to enforcement action.'

Ms Dick said that police will move 'swiftly' to fine people who blatantly ignore coronavirus lockdown rules and said officers in London had issued more than 300 fixed penalty notices in the space of 24 hours for 'flagrant' violations of the regulations.

Dame Cressida said her officers would be prepared to assist supermarket staff if customers became 'obstructive and aggressive' when they were told they must wear a face covering.

And in a veiled review of the Prime Minister's bike tour to the Olympic Park, Dame Cressida Dick said, "To me, a reasonable interpretation of that is that you can do your exercise from your front door and return to your front door," adding, "The public sees us all as role models ".

Ministers have warned that tougher lockdown rules could be introduced to stem a rise in cases.

Britons can go on 70 mile bike rides but only sit on park benches 'for a short pause', should think carefully about meeting a friend for a coffee while walking and must never go to the supermarket without a mask, they said.

Mr Malthouse also accused the public of 'searching for the loopholes in the law' by flouting the third national lockdown – comparing it to pubs serving scotch eggs to stay open last year – and insisted that it is the police's job to scrutinise where people are going and who they are meeting outdoors.

Amid widespread confusion about whether people are allowed to sit on park benches during their daily exercise, No10 sources also told MailOnline that a "short break" during exercise was "appropriate". However, they stressed that it was illegal to go out "just to sit in public".

Carrie Symonds 'is definitely behind' Boris's outburst against the 'demented' Chinese': Tories rage against PM's fiancée – who has campaigned against selling Pangolin 'sex aid' meat – after Johnson said it was to blame for Covid

Former Tory aides told MailOnline that Carrie was 'definitely' behind Mr Johnson's conservation push, pointing out he rarely talked about such issues before they were linked

Former Tory aides told MailOnline that Carrie was 'definitely' behind Mr Johnson's conservation push, pointing out he rarely talked about such issues before they were linked

Boris Johnson has come under fire from his own party for publicly shaming China's use of traditional medicine and blaming the 'demented' practice of harvesting pangolin scales for causing coronavirus.

Conservative insiders detected the Prime Minister's fiancée Carrie Symonds' influence in his incendiary remarks, which has sparked a furious row with Beijing.

In an environmental speech to world leaders yesterday Mr Johnson tore into people who 'grind up the scales of a pangolin' in a bid to become more 'potent' – a thinly veiled attack on Chinese remedies.

Ms Symonds has been vocal in her opposition to wet markets, where the animals are sold, gaining praise from Peta as it announced her as one of its most influential activists of 2020

Former Tory aides told MailOnline she was 'definitely' behind Mr Johnson's conservation push and are growing concerned that her enthusiasm for such issues are eating up too much of the Government's bandwidth at the expense of other policy areas.

One Tory insider said: 'When the f*** was he talking about the environment before he got with her? I've never seen Boris talk about the environment.

'It's also a tangential issue. It is completely lacking any political antennae. it is not mission critical. This government should be about the public's agenda, not Carrie's agenda.'

The Tory said there was a 'time and a place' to talk about conservation issues, and this was 'not it'.

Mr Johnson made the remarks in a virtual speech to the One Planet Summit, hosted by France's President Macron, citing the illegal trade in the scaly anteater-like creatures.

They are widely used in Chinese medicine and their trafficking has been blamed for transmitting the virus from bats found in the wild to humans.

The first documented cases of the Covid-19 were in the Chinese city of Wuhan, with a wet market trade in exotic animals being considered a likely source.

Mr Johnson's attack on China was followed by a broadside by Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab over the treatment of the Uighur minority.

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