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Covid UK: The daily death toll stands at 1,564 – the highest since the pandemic began


The UK today recorded its deadliest day since the Covid pandemic began, with an additional 1,564 victims. However, cases have again decreased and hospital admissions in the hardest hit areas are falling, giving hope that the peak of the second wave may be over.

Health Department figures show that the daily laboratory-confirmed death toll has increased by 50 percent from week to week. Data suggests that the total number of suspected and confirmed coronavirus victims has now passed the 100,000 mark.

The three deadliest days of the UK's Covid crisis were all recorded in 2021, with today's figure surpassing 1,325 last Friday. However, deaths always lag weeks behind cases, which means that deaths don't start falling for at least two weeks after the infections drop. Public Health England chiefs said there were now "more deaths in the second wave than the first".

However, government statistics also show that the UK's outbreak is finally slowing. Another 47,525 positive tests were reported today, a 23.7 percent decrease from last Wednesday's toll of 62,322. It's the fourth day in a row that infections have decreased from week to week.

The dismal death toll came hours after Boris Johnson refused to rule out further tightening of the lockdown – but he also welcomed "early" signs that the brutal restrictions are bringing the coronavirus under control.

The Prime Minister insisted that measures in England be "constantly reviewed" as Keir Starmer wanted to know why they were looser than last spring despite higher cases. Mr Johnson warned that the NHS is at "significant risk" of being flooded and the "only way" to protect it is to abide by the "current rules".

Despite the recent large death toll, Mr Johnson was particularly optimistic about the looming effects of the restrictions. He said the country is "now starting to see the signs of some signs" that the move is having an impact in parts of the country, but stressed that it was "early days" and urged people to "maintain their discipline" .

MailOnline analysis suggests that the outbreak in England may have slowed before the blanket lockdown on Jan. 4, and infection numbers in the hardest hit regions peaked earlier in the year. In parts of the country that saw the worst outbreaks in the first week of 2021 – London, the southeast and east of England – the tide appears to have turned. Since then, cases have decreased.

Coronavirus hospital admissions have also declined in London and the Southeast, although the number of patients in the wards is still rising after exceeding the peaks measured in the first wave.

The numbers show that Tier 4 – which kept schools open – thwarted the spread of the superinfectious mutant strain of the virus. However, it appears that the measure has not reduced infections fast enough for ministers who have instead opted for further restrictions on daily living.

Boris Johnson

Keir Starmer

Boris Johnson and Keir Starmer clashed bitterly at PMQs in the Commons today over managing the coronavirus crisis

As of Saturday, people who pick up take-away meals will no longer be allowed to enter restaurants, but will have to wait outside, she told the Scottish Parliament.

As of Saturday, people who pick up take-away meals will no longer be allowed to enter restaurants, but will have to wait outside, she told the Scottish Parliament.

Did England peak before the lockdown? In Kent and other Tier 4 areas, Covid outbreaks slowed in early 2021

The UK coronavirus outbreak could have slowed before the national lockdown began on January 4th. Data suggests that infection numbers appeared to peak in the hardest hit regions early in the year.

In parts of the country that saw the worst outbreaks in the first week of 2021 – London, the southeast and east of England – the tide appears to have turned. Since then, cases have decreased.

Millions of people who lived in these areas were forced into strict Tier 4 restrictions the weekend before Christmas. They had to stay home for two weeks trying to control the new variant before the national lockdown began.

Infection rates fell in most parts of the country in early January, suggesting that local lockdown rules in place in December were taking effect but were not quick enough to please ministers, who saw a drastic change just days into the New Year demanded national shutdown.

The national numbers paint a similar picture: the 45,533 new positive tests announced today represent a 25 percent decrease from that time last week and represent the third day in a row that the country's infection rate has fallen.

It's too early to reliably show the impact of the national lockdown in the data, but cases that are occurring in some of the worst-hit areas suggest that Tier 4 rules were working before they were abandoned.

Data from Kent, which was at the center of the recent outbreak, showed that even in Tier 4, cases were still fluctuating. They went down in all 13 local authorities that were ranked Tier 4 before Christmas and then rose again in January before declining again around year 4, when the lockdown was announced.

In Liverpool, the only part of the country that was downgraded from Tier 3 to Tier 2 in December after officials alleged a mass testing program brought the city's outbreak under control, cases skyrocketed at the end of the year, although the rate is still rising the lockdown rate has slowed.

On another brutal day for the UK with Covid running rampant:

  • Deputy Chief Medical Officer Jonathan Van-Tam has downplayed the idea of ​​a ten-foot rule on social distancing, stating that the distance probably wouldn't make a difference as the new variant doesn't make people cough harder.
  • Mr Hancock has admitted that some hospital patients could be put in hotels under pressure on the NHS.
  • Ministers are finally running coronavirus vaccinations around the clock after bowing to immense pressure to speed up the program.
  • Education Secretary Gavin Williamson said he was "disgusted" when footballer Marcus Rashford revealed the state of the government's free school lunch packages for poorer children.
  • Diplomatic tensions with China have increased again after the Prime Minister blamed his "insane" traditional medicine for the pandemic and the UK announced sanctions for human rights abuses.
  • New figures show that more than half of virus patients in the intensive care unit are over 50 or 60 years old.
  • Large supermarkets have teamed up to officially ban customers without face masks.

The prime minister was grilled in PMQs today and then by the bipartisan liaison committee as he was again faced with a flurry of calls to tighten the national crackdown even further – something Nicola Sturgeon has announced is happening in Scotland.

Speaking to MPs this afternoon, the prime minister said he was "concerned" about the new Brazilian variant of the virus.

“As you know, we have already taken strict measures to prevent new infections from abroad. We are taking steps to do so in response to the Brazilian variation. & # 39;

In the UK, it has yet to be identified, and there is no evidence that it causes any more severe infection than other strains – although there are concerns that it could be as transmissible as the Kent strain.

It's normal for viruses to mutate, and early signs don't suggest any of the new variants of the coronavirus is more deadly than others, but in some places it continues to evolve to allow it to spread faster.

If the virus spreads faster it inevitably leads to more cases, which in turn leads to a higher number of deaths, even if the strain itself is not more dangerous.

During the committee, the prime minister also warned parents that he was still unsure whether schools would be allowed to reopen after mid-February.

When asked if they would reopen next month, he said, “Obviously the priority is to open schools as soon as possible. Whether we can do that after half the semester depends on a number of things. The success of the vaccination process depends on our not finding out whether the South African or Brazilian variants are vaccine resistant.

“We have no evidence of this, but it has to go well. However, it is crucial that the lockdown measures go well. What we are seeing today are some early signs of progress in containing the virus, but it is far too early to say if we can see any relaxation in February. & # 39;

Downing Street is considering options ranging from limiting takeaway and clicking and collecting, to closing more workplaces and kindergartens, to banning training with friends. Matt Hancock said this morning that the "next few days" would be key to understanding whether the lockdown was working. The Prime Minister should wait until the weekend to take a final decision on new measures.

However, scientists have indicated that the critical capacity in the NHS will still be hugely strained through March due to the delay between infection and illness. Up to 250,000 people a day are said to be infected with the virus.

London Councilors and Mayor Sadiq Khan today called on Mr Johnson to introduce new measures, such as the immediate closure of places of worship or the risk of "unsustainable pollution" of services.

Ms. Sturgeon informed the Scottish Parliament this afternoon that from Saturday she will ban outdoor drinking and non-essential click-and-collect as well as take-out restaurants.

Previously, Mr Hancock had resisted Tory's mounting demands to ensure draconian restrictions were eased from March 8 – about three weeks after the government is said to have vaccinated the most vulnerable 14 million.

However, in a glimmer of hope, Department of Health data suggests that the UK outbreak may have slowed before the national lockdown began on Jan. 4, as infection numbers in the hardest hit regions appeared to peak earlier in the year.

Millions living in London, the south-east and east of England were forced to adhere to strict Tier 4 restrictions on the weekend before Christmas and failed in festive plans for millions as ministers tried to get a grip on the new variant of the virus to get.

And by the first week of January, infection rates in the area began to decline, suggesting that the highest level of measures may have been enough to prevent the superinfectious mutant strain from spreading.

It can take up to two weeks for someone infected with the virus to show symptoms, get a test, and then get a positive result. This means there will be a delay before the effects of constraints become visible in the data.

In another positive sign, the second wave could subside. The data also shows that hospital admissions in London and the east of England peaked in the days following the lockdown.

Health Department statistics seem to show that London peaked on January 6 – the second day of closure – when the seven-day average was 864. It fell to 845 the following day. In the southeast, hospital stays peaked on January 6 when they reached 662.

And in the east of England – which was also caught in the top brackets of restrictions – they had begun to calm down by January 4th.

It can take weeks for someone infected with the virus to experience symptoms that are severe enough to be hospitalized. This means there is a delay between a decline in cases and hospital stays. However, the early downturn adds to claims that Tier 4 – which kept the schools open – was enough to control the mutated variant.

People carrying out security checks wear masks at a supermarket in Peckham, south east London, this morning. Some people have exceptions to the mask rule

People carrying out security checks wear masks at a supermarket in Peckham, south east London, this morning. Some people have exceptions to the mask rule

The buyer angrily told the security guard at Morrisons today that he did not need to wear clothes because he had an illness

The buyer angrily told the security guard at Morrisons today that he did not need to wear clothes because he had an illness

Tube services on the Jubilee Line were still full this morning in London despite the brutal lockdown restrictions in place

Tube services on the Jubilee Line were still full this morning in London despite the brutal lockdown restrictions in place

Sturgeon gazumps PM again by tightening lockdown in Scotland

Nicola Sturgeon today banned Scots from drinking outside and placing non-essential click-and-collect orders as she tightened Scotland's lockdown even further.

As of Saturday, people who pick up take-away meals will no longer be allowed to enter restaurants, but will have to wait outside, she told the Scottish Parliament.

And new laws are being put in place to legally require companies to force them to allow employees to work from home when they can.

When she reached out to the MSPs in Holyrood, she said that new lockdown restrictions appear to be having an impact, with the rise in new daily cases slowing around the turn of the year.

However, she said there was "no room for complacency" and added: "It is too early to be completely confident that the situation will stabilize.

"Even if it does, it will only be due to a lockdown – unfortunately this is not an indication that it is safe to facilitate it in any way yet."

Pressure on the NHS, Ms. Sturgeon said, is likely to continue "for some time" as she urged people to keep abiding by the new regulations.

Ms. Sturgeon's decision is likely to put pressure on Boris Johnson, who is also believed to be considering tightening the rules in England.

Only retailers selling essentials such as clothing, baby equipment and books will be able to offer collection services in Scotland from this weekend.

Even as they slowed down in the capital and in regions that fell into the hardest bracket first, the number of patients in the hospital continued to grow as the number of new cases to be treated on a daily basis is still high.

Hospital admissions for patients suffering from the virus also continue to increase in the Southwest, Northwest, Northeast and Midlands.

Despite the declines, hospital admissions remain above the highest levels seen on the darkest days of the first wave and the last month of last year – one warning sign could still overwhelm health workers.

In London they stood at 150 in early December before going up and never went above 750 in April. For the Southeast, they stood at 165 in December and never moved above 323 in the first wave.

It's too early to reliably show the impact of the national lockdown in the data, but cases that are occurring in some of the worst-hit areas suggest that Tier 4 rules were working before they were abandoned.

However, some government scientists fear that the actual fall rate is still in excess of 250,000 per day. You have warned the Prime Minister that despite the introduction of the vaccine, the death rate may not start falling until the middle of next month.

Despite the more positive news about infections, Sir Keir incited Mr Johnson that he was already too late to tighten the rules.

"The next big decision is obvious. Current restrictions aren't strong enough to control the virus," he said.

"Can the Prime Minister tell us when the infection rates are much higher than in March, when the hospital admissions are much higher than last March, when the death rates are much higher than last March, why on earth are the restrictions weaker than last March? "

Mr. Johnson replied, “We will and will continue to review things.

"And if there is a need to tighten the restrictions, which I am not ruling out, we will of course come to this house."

But he also highlighted the "serious damage caused by bans".

"The lockdown measures we have taken in combination with the Tier 4 measures we have applied are showing the first signs of an effect and we need to take this into account," said Johnson.

Sir Keir challenged the Prime Minister to "act slowly" when infection rates began to rise in December.

"The last PMQs were on December 16th," said the Labor leader. The Prime Minister told us at the time that we would see a significant reduction in the virus in his words. He told us at the time that there was no need for endless locks and no need to change the rules of mixing Christmas.

Since then, since the last PMQs, 17,000 people have died of Covid, 60,000 people have been hospitalized and there have been over a million new cases. How did the Prime Minister get this so wrong and why did he act so slowly? & # 39;

But a visibly angry Mr Johnson replied, “Of course (Sir Keir) does not indicate that on December 18, two days later, the government was informed of the spread of the new variant and the fact that it was spreading roughly 50 -70 percent faster than the old variant, and therefore it is indeed correct to say that the situation today is indeed very worrying. & # 39;

He added, "This is the toughest time, but we can see the way forward."

Mr Johnson also sounded optimistic about the vaccine's launch, accusing Sir Keir of not giving the program enough credit.

He said the UK is in a "comparatively favorable position" compared to other countries.

No. 10 sources have indicated that ministers were willing to tighten the lockdown further unless the situation improved by the weekend.

"The compliance data is mixed," said an insider. "We should have better data by the weekend and then we have to decide whether we have to go further."

Another source told MailOnline that Ms. Sturgeon was acting on "escalating" cases in Scotland, albeit from a lower level.

Additional measures under consideration in England include the lifting of the exemption that allows two people to meet outdoors to practice sports.

No 10 pins hope we obey the rules … but we hold the big stick in reverse

HOW RULES CAN CHANGE

Finish the practice meetings

Ministers are considering lifting the derogation that allows two people to meet outdoors to play sports.

The exception, which did not exist in the original lockdown, was added as a lifeline for the lonely. But scenes of crowded parks have raised concerns that they are being abused.

Increase wearing of the mask

Health officials are considering plans to make masks mandatory in crowded outdoor areas like queues and markets for supermarkets. Chris Whitty, chief medical officer, said this week that masks are not required in most outdoor environments, but it might "make sense" to wear them in crowded spaces.

Close more businesses

Some ministers are pushing for more businesses to close, such as real estate agents and click-and-collect retail stores, many of which closed when the first lockdown occurred. Proponents of the move say it would help limit the spread of the virus and lessen the reasons people go out. No10 didn't rule it out.

3m social distancing

Some government scientists are pushing for the two-meter social distancing rule to be extended to three, but officials say the idea is taking a back seat for now.

Churches and kindergartens close

London Mayor Sadiq Khan has called for places of worship to be closed, while Labor wants kindergartens to be closed. However, ministers insist that no move is currently being considered.

Some ministers have pushed for more businesses to close, including real estate agents, outdoor markets and click-and-collect retail.

Scientists are also advocating increasing the two-meter rule of social distancing to three meters.

SAGE member Prof. Andrew Hayward told Sky News that ramping up controls might be the only way to ensure the lockdown can end in March.

"We could see a faster decline in this number of hospitalizations and deaths if we tightened these lockdowns and specifically focused on whether all people who go to work really have to go to work," he said.

After a serious incident was reported in the capital last Friday due to increasing cases of Covid-19, Georgia and the chairman of the London Council, Georgia Gould, wrote to Mr Johnson asking for stricter measures.

Aside from closing places of worship, they called on the Prime Minister to make wearing masks outside the home mandatory – including in queues in supermarkets, on main streets and in other potentially crowded outdoor areas.

The four main demands also include the government providing more financial support to Londoners who are self-isolating and unable to work, backed by improved asymptomatic tests for key workers.

The two heads of state and government also called for the introduction of vaccines across London to be accelerated and for daily vaccination records to be made available by borough and ethnic group.

"We know how difficult these decisions are and how they will impose further severe restrictions on the Londoners," the letter said.

"As the new infection rates remain high, we have no choice but to ask you to implement them."

Mr. Khan and Ms. Gould said places of worship are "critically important to the communities" and "we would not make this request unless the situation were very serious".

The letter also calls for four other temporary measures: an urgent review of what constitutes essential and non-essential retail, stricter guidelines on how retailers can prevent unsafe queues and overcrowding, the ban on click and collection services in non-essential retail chains, and one stricter guidance on size limits for weddings, funerals and similar gatherings.

In a round of interviews, Hancock told Sky News that it was "impossible to know" when restrictions might be eased.

"We will not hold the restrictions for a moment longer than necessary, but we will hold them for as long as they are necessary," he said.

He added, “I'm looking forward to the fall rate just starting to level off. I hope we'll see that in the next few days. The few days ahead are the crucial time to know if this national lockdown is working. & # 39;

When asked if the NHS could be overwhelmed, Hancock told BBC Breakfast: “We will do everything we can to give the NHS the support and resources it needs.

"This includes opening the Nightingale Hospitals and London Nightingale Hospital is now receiving patients for the first time since April."

He said sending some patients to hotels was "another backup plan" that would only be put in place when it was appropriate for the patient, but "it is not something we are actively doing".

He said it was only for "step-down" patients.

He insisted that the government was "absolutely ready" to give people a round-the-clock push "if it helps to speed up the vaccination program."

"I can't see that this is the main factor because most people want to be vaccinated during the day and also most of the people who are getting the vaccinations want to have them during the day, but there may be circumstances where this would help," 39; he said.

"We are absolutely ready for that."

Mr. Hancock dodged and said if the government was going to change any rules, saying that "these things are always checked".

"What I would say is that now it really comes down to how much everyone follows the rules in place," he told BBC Breakfast.

Coronavirus rates have continued to rise in Liverpool, which was only in the unusually mild tier 2 before Christmas

Coronavirus rates have continued to rise in Liverpool, which was only in the unusually mild tier 2 before Christmas

Cases in Kent appear to have decreased over Christmas and then again in early January due to Tier 4, but they picked up in the middle of the New Year, suggesting the restrictions weren't working well enough to keep the government happy

Cases in Kent appear to have decreased over Christmas and then again in early January due to Tier 4, but they picked up in the middle of the New Year, suggesting the restrictions weren't working well enough to keep the government happy

A commuter on an anniversary train this morning. Some people don't need to wear a mask if they have a valid exception

A commuter on an anniversary train this morning. Some people don't need to wear a mask if they have a valid exception

Facemasked commuters wait for an overground train at Canada Water Station in East London this morning

Facemasked commuters wait for an overground train at Canada Water Station in East London this morning

A security guard on the door of Morrisons in Leeds watches customers arrive today to make sure they are wearing masks

A security guard on the door of Morrisons in Leeds watches customers arrive today to make sure they are wearing masks

Matt Hancock defied Tory's demands to ensure draconian restrictions are eased from March 8, about three weeks after the government is said to have vaccinated the 14 million most vulnerable people

Matt Hancock defied Tory's demands to ensure draconian restrictions are eased from March 8, about three weeks after the government is said to have vaccinated the 14 million most vulnerable people

Sadiq Khan and councilors are calling for stricter curbs

Die Londoner Räte und Bürgermeister Sadiq Khan haben Boris Johnson aufgefordert, unverzüglich strengere Coronavirus-Maßnahmen – einschließlich der Schließung von Kultstätten – umzusetzen, da sonst die Gefahr besteht, dass der NHS und die öffentlichen Dienste nicht nachhaltig belastet werden.

After a serious incident was reported in the capital last Friday due to the increasing cases of Covid-19, Georgia and the chairman of the London Council, Georgia Gould, wrote to the prime minister demanding action similar to those in March and April.

Aside from closing places of worship, they called on the Prime Minister to make wearing masks outside the home mandatory – including in queues in supermarkets, on main streets and in other potentially crowded outdoor areas.

The four main demands also include the government providing more financial support to Londoners who are self-isolating and unable to work, backed by improved asymptomatic tests for key workers.

The two heads of state and government also called for the introduction of vaccines across London to be accelerated and for daily vaccination records to be made available by borough and ethnic group.

"We know how difficult these decisions are and how they will impose further severe restrictions on the Londoners," the letter said. "As the new infection rates remain high, we have no choice but to ask you to implement them."

„Natürlich können Sie jederzeit Änderungen am Rand vornehmen, aber wir haben eine sehr erhebliche Einschränkung eingeführt, die Maßnahmen zum Bleiben zu Hause. Es ist dann möglich, weitere Einschränkungen vorzunehmen, aber ich würde sagen, dass das Wichtigste ist Die Einhaltung der bestehenden Maßnahmen wird den Unterschied ausmachen. & # 39;

Er wiederholte seine Warnung, dass einige Leute die Ausnahmeregelung für Leute, die mit einem Freund im Freien Sport treiben, "verlängern" würden.

"Was ich lieber sehen würde, ist, dass jeder dieser Regel folgt und sie nicht streckt oder biegt. Die Leute sollten den Mickey nicht aus den Regeln herausnehmen und sie sollten die Regeln nicht strecken, die Leute sollten die Regeln respektieren, weil sie." Ich bin aus einem bestimmten Grund dort und das soll alle beschützen «, sagte er.

Herr Hancock begrüßte auch den Schritt von John Lewis, das Klicken zu beenden und Dienste zu sammeln. „Ich bin John Lewis für die vorgenommenen Änderungen dankbar, und ich bin den Supermärkten für die erhöhte Compliance dankbar, die sie benötigen werden. Das ist bei weitem der beste Weg, dies unter Kontrolle zu bringen “, sagte er.

Der Premierminister sagte gestern gegenüber dem Kabinett, es sei "wichtiger denn je, dass die Öffentlichkeit zu Hause bleibt".

Aber Käufer und Pendler, die heute Morgen während der Hauptverkehrszeit durch London reisten, trugen keine Gesichtsmasken.

Priti Patel sagte gestern Abend, dass eine Minderheit der Öffentlichkeit "die Gesundheit der Nation gefährdet" und fügte hinzu, dass Beamte schneller Geldstrafen verhängen, wenn Menschen eindeutig gegen die Vorschriften für Coronaviren verstoßen.

Manche Menschen müssen keine Maske tragen, wenn sie eine gültige Ausnahmeregelung haben, die sie schwer belastet oder aufgrund einer körperlichen oder geistigen Krankheit, Beeinträchtigung oder Behinderung belastet – und sie müssen keine Beweise mit sich führen.

Es wächst jedoch die Sorge, dass andere einfach gegen das Gesetz verstoßen, weil sie keines tragen wollen – und Frau Patel gab bekannt, dass in Großbritannien seit März fast 45.000 feste Strafanzeigen ausgestellt wurden.

Martin Hewitt, Vorsitzender des Rates der Nationalen Polizeichefs, warnte diejenigen, die in Bus oder Zug keine Maske tragen, mit einer Geldstrafe rechnen können, es sei denn, sie sind davon ausgenommen – und die Polizei würde keine Zeit mehr damit verschwenden, mit Menschen wie denen zu argumentieren, die anderer Meinung sind mit den Regeln.

Er sagte: „Es ist gefährlich, in einem Bus oder Zug keine Gesichtsbedeckung zu tragen. It puts the lives of other travelers at risk, including those critical workers who must continue to use public transportation to do their important work. "

Eine Reihe von Supermärkten, darunter Tesco, Waitrose, Asda, Sainsbury's und Morrisons, haben sich nun verpflichtet, Kunden, die sich weigern, Gesichtsbedeckungen zu tragen, härter zu werden, indem sie ihnen den Zutritt zu ihren Geschäften verweigern.

Polizei und Minister diskutieren strengere Übungsregeln

Die Polizei befindet sich in Gesprächen mit Ministern, in denen die Regeln für Bewegung und Reisen verschärft werden könnten, teilten die Abgeordneten heute mit.

Owen Weatherill vom National Police Chiefs 'Council, der die Reaktion der Polizei auf die Pandemie in England und Wales leitet, sagte, die Regeln für die Ausübung seien "eine echte Herausforderung".

Er sagte dem Innenausschuss, dass die Gesundheitsrichtlinien und Sperrgesetze detaillierter gestaltet werden sollten, um sie der Öffentlichkeit klarer zu machen.

Der stellvertretende Polizeichef sagte, es gebe eine "aktive Diskussion" zwischen der Polizei, dem Innenministerium und dem Gesundheitsministerium darüber, wie die Regeln verbessert werden könnten, "um der Öffentlichkeit und auch unseren Beamten mehr Klarheit zu verschaffen".

"Es wurde absichtlich versucht, es anfangs flexibel zu gestalten, damit die Menschen ein gewisses Maß an Wahlfreiheit haben … aber das bringt eindeutig andere Probleme mit sich", sagte er.

Er fügte hinzu, dass Reisebeschränkungen "eine echte Herausforderung beim Sport" seien.

„Das fordert einige Kräfte mehr heraus als andere. Wenn Sie zufällig in einem Gebiet mit natürlichen Schönheitsflecken operieren, zieht dies Menschen an “, sagte er.

„Die Vorschriften sind jedoch so konstruiert, dass sie die Art der Übung, die eine Person durchführen möchte, nicht einschränken. Daher besteht hier ein Gleichgewicht zwischen dem Versuch, den Menschen zu erlauben, bei der Art der Übung, die sie ausführen, einen freien Willen auszuüben und warum es keine physische Einschränkung gibt, wie weit Sie reisen können, um dies zu tun. & # 39;

Die ranghöchste britische Polizistin, Dame Cressida Dick, sagte, die Polizeibeamten der Metropolitan Police wären bereit, das Ladenpersonal zu unterstützen, wenn die Kunden "obstruktiv und aggressiv" würden, wenn ihnen gesagt würde, sie müssten eine Gesichtsbedeckung tragen.

Bei einem Vorfall an diesem Morgen in einem Morrisons-Geschäft in Peckham im Südosten Londons kam es zu einem Zusammenstoß eines Bauarbeiters mit einem Sicherheitsbeamten des Geschäfts, als ihm der Zutritt zum Geschäft verweigert wurde, weil er keine Maske trug.

The shopper angrily told the guard that he did not have to wear because he had a medical condition. But the guard said he was not wearing a certificate exempting him around his neck and refused to allow him in.

During the stand-off, the shopper pulled out a piece of paper from his pocket, insisting it was a Government-issued exemption certificate. After examining it, the guard told the man that as he was not wearing it around his neck, he would not be allowed into the store.

The disgruntled construction worker, who was trying to buy some breakfast, told MailOnline: 'It's quite ridiculous. How am I supposed to wear this certificate around my neck every time I go into a shop?

'I've never had this problem before but clearly the supermarkets are getting a lot tougher about imposing the mask rule. I've got a medical reason for not wearing a mask and always make sure that I carry my exemption certificate with me.'

NHS 'could discharge patients to care homes without a test'

The NHS is planning to discharge Covid patients into care homes without a negative test for the virus, it was claimed today — despite the virus ripping through homes and sparking thousands of deaths during the first wave.

Documents say the patients won't be swabbed but will need to have been isolating for 14 days and not be suffering symptoms of the virus. Care homes have already warned it would be a 'grave mistake' to use their empty beds as overflow for packed hospitals.

Trusts are also reportedly considering discharging Covid patients to hotels — under plans dubbed 'home and hotel' — after exhausting critical care capacity and facing barriers to utilising the Nightingales.

Patients suffering from the virus are already being transferred from King's College hospital, London, to a nearby Best Western hotel in Croydon, The Guardian claims.

Health Secretary Matt Hancock today admitted No10 was looking at 'all options' to ease mounting pressure on the NHS, which is now treating 35,000 Covid patients — compared to 21,000 during the darkest spell of the first wave last spring.

'There are huge pressures on the NHS and we are looking to all different ways that we can relieve those pressures,' he told Sky News.

'We would only ever do that if it was clinically the right thing for somebody. In some cases, people need sit-down care, they don't actually need to be in a hospital bed.'

In an illustration of the problems being caused by the surge in cases, there were claims today that the NHS is planning to discharge Covid patients into care homes without a negative test for the virus — despite the virus ripping through homes and sparking thousands of deaths during the first wave.

Documents say the patients won't be swabbed but will need to have been isolating for 14 days and not be suffering symptoms of the virus. Care homes have already warned it would be a 'grave mistake' to use their empty beds as overflow for packed hospitals.

Trusts are also reportedly considering discharging Covid patients to hotels — under plans dubbed 'home and hotel' — after exhausting critical care capacity and facing barriers to utilising the Nightingales.

Patients suffering from the virus are already being transferred from King's College hospital, London, to a nearby Best Western hotel in Croydon, The Guardian claims.

Mr Hancock admitted the government is looking at 'all options' to ease mounting pressure on the NHS, which is now treating 35,000 Covid patients — compared to 21,000 during the darkest spell of the first wave last spring.

'There are huge pressures on the NHS and we are looking to all different ways that we can relieve those pressures,' he told Sky News.

'We would only ever do that if it was clinically the right thing for somebody. In some cases, people need sit-down care, they don't actually need to be in a hospital bed.'

It comes amid fears hospitals could be overwhelmed by the surging admissions of Britons suffering from the virus, with health bosses warning the crisis won't peak until February. It can take infected patients several weeks to become severely ill, meaning any fall in cases won't be seen on NHS wards for at least a fortnight.

At a press conference yesterday, Priti Patel was asked why the lockdown rules were laxer than those introduced last March.

The Home Secretary initially said the regulations were 'tough enough' and simply needed to be followed more closely.

But she then confirmed ministers were looking again at whether the restrictions need to be tightened.

'These issues are live within government,' she said. 'Rules are always under review. We are constantly, right now, looking at where we are at.'

Ms Patel also revealed that police had handed out 45,000 Covid fines – and warned that a minority were 'putting the health of the nation at risk'.

The PM's spokesman said: 'If we need to take further action we will. But the important thing now is we are asking people to stay at home.'

Ministers are growing alarmed by the emergence of a Covid hotspot on Merseyside, which has overtaken London as the area where the virus is increasing fastest.

A surge in cases there could be embarrassing for the Government, which made great play of the decision to move the region into Tier Two at the end of the second lockdown while most of the rest of the North West stayed in Tier Three.

The highest overall case rate in England remains Barking and Dagenham in London.

Boris Johnson 'WILL trial 24/7 Covid vaccinations' as Matt Hancock admits GPs in parts of the UK are having to PAUSE vaccinations because of a lack of supply

Ministers will trial round-the-clock Covid vaccinations after bowing to immense pressure to adopt the 24/7 roll-out, according to reports.

A senior Government source claimed this morning that Number 10 is considering a 'pilot where vaccinations are offered for longer hours' to gauge whether there is enough demand to keep jab hubs open through the night.

It marks another U-turn for the Government after Boris Johnson claimed earlier this week there was 'no clamour' for appointments after 8pm. The comments sparked fury among elderly Brits and critical workers who said they would happily come day or night to speed up the rollout.

There will now be serious doubts about whether ministers are capable of delivering a round-the-clock operation because of issues with supply. This morning it emerged GPs leading the rollout have been forced to pause vaccinations to allow other parts of the country to catch up.

Practices that have already inoculated every patient over the age of 80 and are now looking to dish the jabs out to the over-70s have had their deliveries cancelled because minsters want to avoid a postcode lottery, according to The Telegraph.

Matt Hancock hinted this morning that a lack of supply was behind the decision to delay jabs despite the vaccination programme desperately needing to get up to speed.

Rita Passey receives a Covid-19 vaccine at the NHS vaccine centre at Millennium Point centre in Birmingham on Tuesday

Rita Passey receives a Covid-19 vaccine at the NHS vaccine centre at Millennium Point centre in Birmingham on Tuesday

Ken Hughes is also given the injection at the mass-vaccination hub in Birmingham on Tuesday

Ken Hughes is also given the injection at the mass-vaccination hub in Birmingham on Tuesday

Mavis, 87, is pushed by her daughter out of the Covid-19 vaccination centre at ExCel London after receiving her jab

Mavis, 87, is pushed by her daughter out of the Covid-19 vaccination centre at ExCel London after receiving her jab

Quizzed about the reports, the health secretary told the BBC Radio 4 Today Programme: 'The rate-limiting step on the rollout is the supply of the vaccine itself.

'We are now managing to get that supply more than we have done before and it will increase over the next few weeks,' he said.

'We have the capacity to get that vaccine out. The challenge is that we need to get the vaccine in.

How the Government's vaccine plan breaks down

PHASE 1 (FEB 15 TARGET)

CARE HOME RESIDENTS – 300,000

CARE HOME WORKERS – 500,000

AGE 80+ – 3,300,000

HEALTHCARE WORKERS – 2,400,000

SOCIAL CARE WORKERS – 1,400,000

AGE 75-79 – 2,300,000

AGE 70-74 – 3,200,000

CLINICALLY EXTREMELY VULNERABLE (UNDER 70) – 1,200,000

PHASE 2 (SPRING)

65-69 2,900,000

AT-RISK UNDER 65 7,300,000

60-64 1,800,000

55-59 2,400,000

50-54 2,800,000

PHASE 3 (AUTUMN)

REST OF ADULT POPULATION 21,000,000

'What I know is that the supply will increase over the next few weeks and that means the very rapid rate that we are going at at the moment will continue to accelerate over the next couple of weeks.'

Britain's vaccine drive has started to pick up pace following the approval of the Oxford vaccine but has still only seen 2.43million people immunised against the disease since launching at the beginning of December.

It is far short of the 2million a week needed to deliver on Number 10's ambitious promise to hit a target of 13.4 million jabs by mid-February and end the most draconian lockdown curbs.

Pressure to adopt a 24/7 scheme peaked yesterday as Nicola Sturgeon today hinted Scotland was considering the tactic.

She said: 'We will look at anything and everything that allows us to get this vaccination programme done as quickly as possible'.

Ms Sturgeon said supplies of the vaccine were still 'relatively limited', and that with the focus currently on getting jabs to care home residents and those aged over 80, these groups did 'not lend themselves to out-of-hours vaccination'.

Meanwhile, Defence Secretary Ben Wallace told the Commons that military personnel can 'do more to assist', as he suggested that the hold-up was due to a lack of stock and problems in the supply chain.

He added: 'I could deploy all 100,000 soldiers tomorrow ready to vaccinate but if the stock isn't there then we'll have people not… we could employ them better off.

'We are very, very clear that we can do more to assist, the Prime Minister knows that and the Prime Minister has indicated that we will be called on as the NHS requires it.'

It comes after Boris clashed with NHS chiefs over the pace of Britain's mass vaccination programme as he blamed the 'excessive bureaucracy' for slowing down the national roll-out.

Officials have said the PM read NHS England chief Sir Simon Stevens the riot act in a series of 'tough' exchanges last week as the Government comes under pressure to halt the cycle of lockdowns.

Downing Street and the NHS said relations had since improved as the No10 now tries to accelerate the roll-out by approving 24/7 vaccine centres.

Tensions between Sir Simon and Mr Johnson had been simmering since before Christmas when the PM was concerned that some non-frontline NHS staff had been vaccinated before people aged 80 and over.

One person briefed on the clash claimed Mr Johnson had invited Brigadier Phil Prosser, who is leading the Army's vaccine taskforce, to a Downing Street press conference last week to warn Sir Simon that the military would be given a bigger role in the programme unless the roll-out was sped up.

But NHS insiders told the Financial Times that Sir Simon had proposed Brig Prosser's attendance at the conference and rejected claims of tension with the PM. No10 called reports of tension 'completely untrue', adding: 'It's a really good relationship.'

No mask, no shopping! Supermarkets' crack down – amid fears of attacks on staff

Britain's biggest supermarkets have united in formally banning customers without masks.

The stores have also urged customers to shop alone in an effort to help combat increasing infections.

Wearing masks will now be strictly enforced at Tesco, Sainsbury's, Waitrose, Morrisons, Marks & Spencer and Lidl.

The move follows pressure from the Government, with some ministers suggesting that retailers have not been doing enough to protect the public.

Many industry leaders are privately furious, however, that shops are being treated as scapegoats for soaring infections.

Read my lips? Security guard remonstrates with woman entering a Morrisons without a mask in London

Read my lips? Security guard remonstrates with woman entering a Morrisons without a mask in London

Asda shopper in Swindon  has full trolley but no coverage

Asda shopper in Swindon  has full trolley but no coverage

There are concerns the clampdown will trigger flashpoints at supermarket doors, with staff facing abuse and even violence.

Tesco explained its tough line, saying: 'To protect our customers and colleagues, we won't let anyone into our stores who is not wearing a face covering, unless they are exempt in line with Government guidance.

'We will have additional security in stores to help manage this.'

Waitrose said: 'Marshals will be positioned at the entrances of all supermarkets. They will have disposable masks for customers who do not have their own and will deny admission to anyone refusing to comply.'

In contrast, both the Co-op and Iceland have refused to enforce wearing masks for fear it will lead to attacks on employees.

The two stores and the British Retail Consortium (BRC) insist the police are responsible for enforcing the rules – not shop workers. The penalty is £200 for a first offence.

The Co-op has seen an 80 per cent rise in attacks, including swearing, spitting and physical assaults, during the pandemic.

Cover-up in Aisle Three: Shopper at Morrisons in Thamesmead has brought along her face mask ¿ but failed to utilise it correctly

Cover-up in Aisle Three: Shopper at Morrisons in Thamesmead has brought along her face mask – but failed to utilise it correctly

It said: 'We have strict policies about ensuring our colleagues are not placed in harm's way.' Iceland said: 'In view of the rising tide of abuse and violence directed at our store colleagues, we do not expect them to confront the small minority of customers who aggressively refuse to comply.'

It has been suggested the Government could increase the social distancing rule for shops from 1m to 2m, and also ban non-essential stores offering 'click and collect'.

The majority of retail industry bosses argue both plans would be a disaster – particularly for small shops. BRC director of business and regulation, Tom Ironside, said: 'The ability for non-essential stores, from florists to toy and book shops, to offer click and collect services has been a lifeline.'

John Lewis has already decided to partially suspend its click and collect service from department stores, although it will still be available through Waitrose.

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