TOP TRENDING

Covid UK: Liverpool's Labor-led city council calls for another national lockdown


Liverpool council presidents today called for a third national lockdown to contain the new "mutant" strain of Covid and prevent a "catastrophe".

The city's incumbent mayor Wendy Simon and the cabinet of the Labor-led city council say the rate of rise in coronavirus cases has reached "alarming levels" and that urgent action is needed to save lives and the NHS.

The new "mutated" strain of Covid is believed to have a higher transmission rate and is most common in London and the South East, where health bosses say hospitals are overburdened.

The tribe is believed to spread from south to north, creating increasing pressure on the NHS.

Cases in Liverpool have nearly tripled to 350 per 100,000 in the past two weeks, despite the city leading the pilot for community testing, which resulted in it becoming the first city to switch from Tier 3 to Tier 2 .

The request for a new lockdown was made in a statement by Cllr Wendy Simon and Public Health Cabinet Member Cllr Paul Brant.

The city's current mayor, Joe Anderson, is on bail with the police on suspicion of conspiracy to bribe and intimidate witnesses.

The statement said: “It is clear that the country is now at a crossroads with Covid-19. The dire reality is that this virulent new strain of virus is very much on the rise today and we must act now to prevent a crisis that will cause even more pain and fear. & # 39;

A health ministry spokeswoman said the government would "not hesitate to take the necessary steps to protect local communities."

It comes as England is on the verge of a blanket shutdown after government efforts to reopen schools were disrupted by leftist councils and teaching unions.

In other coronavirus developments:

  • Ofsted boss Amanda Spielman said the study of children cannot be "taken on leave".
  • Experts who led the UK vaccination program defended the decision to widen the gap between the two doses, insisting that this is "the way we save lives".
  • Last night's health bosses insisted that urgent cancer surgeries in London not be scrapped to ease the burden on hospitals flooded with Covid patients.
  • Jo Stevens, Labor secretary for shadow culture, is being treated in hospital for coronavirus, her staff said last night.
  • Another 57,725 had positive test results and recorded 445 deaths yesterday;
  • A consultant at London Children's Hospital beat up an "irresponsible" nurse who claimed in a BBC interview that her hospital had an "entire children's ward" with Covid.
  • Young women without voting rights are most likely to reject a Covid vaccine if it were available tomorrow. This was the result of the Find Out Now survey.
  • According to a massive poll, Boris Johnson is on the verge of losing most of the seats in the "Red Wall" that brought his historic election victory a year ago and his own seat.

Incumbent Mayor of Liverpool Wendy Simons today called for a third national coronavirus lockdown

Cases in Liverpool have nearly tripled to 350 per 100,000 in the past two weeks, despite the city successfully leading the national pilot for community testing, which resulted in it becoming the first city to move from Tier 3 to Tier, according to Tier 2 was included official figures

Cases in Liverpool have nearly tripled to 350 per 100,000 in the past two weeks, despite the city successfully leading the national pilot for community testing, which resulted in it becoming the first city to move from Tier 3 to Tier, according to Tier 2 was included official figures

Two-thirds of the UK population are now in Tier 4, the rest in Tier 3 locks. Only the Isles of Scilly off the coast of Cornwall are in the easy level 2

Two-thirds of the UK population are now in Tier 4, the rest in Tier 3 locks. Only the Isles of Scilly off the coast of Cornwall are in the easy level 2

The UK posted a record 57,725 Covid-19 cases yesterday, the highest since the pandemic began, and the daily day on day five topped 50,000. The country also saw 445 deaths

The UK posted a record 57,725 Covid-19 cases yesterday, the highest since the pandemic began, and the daily day on day five topped 50,000. The country also saw 445 deaths

Liverpool City Councils said: “We need the government to listen to those on the front lines, both in our hospitals and on the front lines.

“We as a nation can cope with a lockdown. We have before and we can again. The faster we move in one now, the more lives will be saved and the faster a recovery will be.

& # 39; Yes, there will be pain for our retail and hospitality sectors, but they want long-term security and a strong recovery, and a lockdown offers both.

"An additional package of welfare and economic support will also be needed, particularly to protect the most vulnerable."

They said it "goes without saying" that the animal system does not help contain the virus, adding, "London's rates are cause for concern and we will see those rates here and in the rest of the country soon."

“Let's get one step ahead of the curve and act now. We all know too well the dire consequences and costs of not doing so, especially for the most vulnerable in our communities.

“Millions of Brits have made many sacrifices in the last 10 months and none of us want these efforts to be in vain. Great strides have been made in limiting the virus, but we can only do as much as individuals can.

"The country is currently facing a catastrophe that will undo much of what has been achieved if we do not act as a unit."

The UK posted a record 57,725 Covid-19 cases yesterday, the highest since the pandemic began, and the daily day on day five topped 50,000.

The country recorded an additional 445 deaths, bringing the official total to 74,570. However, a total of 90,000 people with Covid-19 have died on their death certificates.

London is now the epicenter of the UK outbreak and its hospitals are being overwhelmed by the flood of patients. The weekly fall rate is 858 per 100,000 people, twice the national average.

A government spokeswoman said, “We stepped up our efforts two weeks ago with the introduction of Tier 4 based on advice from SAGE. It is important that everyone continues to follow the rules to reduce transmission in their areas, save lives and protect our NHS.

"We will constantly review the spread of Covid-19 based on the latest medical and scientific data and have made it clear that we will not hesitate to take the necessary steps to protect local communities."

It comes when scientists warned that England will get stuck in its relentless cycle of coronavirus lockdowns until at least the end of spring, even if the vaccine rollout goes according to plan.

The new strain of coronavirus transmits faster and is most prevalent in London and the South East, where hospitals are congested. The tribe is believed to spread from south to north, creating increasing pressure on the NHS

The new strain of coronavirus transmits faster and is most prevalent in London and the South East, where hospitals are congested. The tribe is believed to spread from south to north, creating increasing pressure on the NHS

London is now the epicenter of the outbreak and its hospitals are being overwhelmed by the flood of patients. The weekly fall rate is 858 per 100,000, twice the national average

London is now the epicenter of the outbreak and its hospitals are being overwhelmed by the flood of patients. The weekly fall rate is 858 per 100,000, twice the national average

Only 2,000 people in the Isles of Scilly stayed in Tier 1 - everyone else in England is now under the highest Tier 3 and 4 locks

Only 2,000 people in the Isles of Scilly stayed in Tier 1 – everyone else in England is now under the highest Tier 3 and 4 locks

Health Secretary Matt Hancock said after the vaccine was approved by Oxford he now has "a very high level of confidence that we will be phasing out this vaccine by the spring," in a worrying echo of Boris Johnson's July claim that the UK did would be back to normal by Christmas.

54-year-old Labor Shadow Minister Jo Stevens is in hospital with coronavirus

Labor shadow culture secretary Jo Stevens is being treated in hospital for coronavirus, her staff said.

A statement said: “Jo asked us to inform you that she is being treated in the hospital for Covid. Thank you for all your good wishes. We'll give an update when we can. & # 39;

It emerged that the 54-year-old Cardiff Central MP signed Covid-19 on New Year's Eve when her advisors said she had been "knocked down" because of her infection.

This evening politicians of all kinds gathered around their colleague, with Sir Keir Starmer leading the well-wishers and tweeting: "Get well soon, Jo, a dear friend and colleague."

Wales' First Minister Mark Drakeford said: “All of our thoughts and best wishes are with Jo for a speedy recovery.

"Thank you to the Jo constituency team for continuing to support Cardiff Central voters during this difficult time."

Nick Thomas Symonds, Shadow Home Secretary, tweeted, "I'm thinking of my friend and Welsh work colleague Jo Stevens tonight – get well soon, Jo!"

Conservative Minister Nadhim Zahawi, who leads the government's vaccine rollout, tweeted, "I wish you a speedy recovery, Jo."

The announcement was the first tweet from her account since December 31, when it was first revealed that Ms. Stevens was battling Covid-19.

However, experts believe the repeated bans and social distancing rules will last "months and months" and will last until May or even well into summer 2021.

The Prime Minister refused to set a "deadline" when he believed the current rules – which 78 percent of the English population have in the hardest level 4 – but admitted they could stay until the spring, whereby Britain is now in a race against time to vaccinate the nation.

Families hoping to meet again after being separated during the holiday season may be out of luck. Scientists believe the outbreak is getting worse and worse. They fear that even the toughest lockdowns will not be able to stop the spread of the new superinfectious variant of the coronavirus.

Professor Paul Hunter, an infectious disease expert at the University of East Anglia, told BBC Radio 4, “It will be some very, very difficult months, hopefully, before we will get relief as we move from spring to summer when there will be lots of people have been vaccinated and the warmer weather will be here. & # 39;

Dr. Simon Clarke, a microbiologist at the University of Reading, told MailOnline that he expected the lockdown rules to apply "through April or May" before the effects of mass vaccination are strong enough to ease restrictions.

And Dr. Gabriel Scally, professor of public health at Bristol University and a member of Independent SAGE, told the website he expected the strict rules to last "months and months" with some form of national lockdown now the best option.

Their comments come after No10 threw 20 million more people into the strictest lockdown rules after being allowed to meet with families over Christmas, meaning 44 million people are now living in Tier 4 – where all non-essential businesses and hospitality businesses are forced to close – The remaining 12 million live in Tier Three. Only the Isles of Scilly with 2,000 inhabitants off Cornwall's coast are in Tier 1.

The government is under increasing pressure to let all school children in England study from home when the new term begins next week amid fears the new strain of Covid-19 will spread.

Gavin Williamson confirmed Friday that all London elementary schools will remain closed for most students next week – and not just those in certain districts as set out earlier in the week – but unions say all schools will be closed for the next two weeks should close.

Last night, the Ministry of Education said distance learning was "a last resort" and classrooms should be reopened "wherever possible" with appropriate security measures to reduce the risk of transmission.

"As we said earlier, as a last resort, we will move to distance learning with the involvement of public health officials in areas where infections and pressures on the NHS are greatest," the spokesman said.

Hundreds of new vaccination sites are set to go live this week as the NHS steps up its vaccination program with the newly approved Oxford University and AstraZeneca Jab.

The government is keen to get children back to school, but leftist councils joined in a revolt against plans when the UK's largest union told members that return was not safe

The government is keen to get children back to school, but leftist councils joined in a revolt against plans when the UK's largest union told members that return was not safe

School principals are calling for the GCSE and A-Level exams to be canceled this summer amid the chaos of the school closings

School principals are calling on the government to cancel the GCSE and A-level exams this summer amid indignation about Gavin Williamson's plans to keep schools open.

Most pre-schools in England are expected to reopen their doors tomorrow, while secondary schools will reopen in a staggered manner later this month with plans to test every student on a weekly basis.

However, yesterday the UK's largest apprenticeship union told its members that it was not safe to return to the classroom. Several left-wing councils called for their elementary schools to switch to online teaching only.

And in yet another blow to the Minister of Education's plans, UK school principals are now calling for this year's exams to be canceled in order to give priority to "overall public health, the safety of students and staff".

They also claim that it would be unfair to force students to take exams if those whose schools opened earlier had more contact time than those with later start dates.

The worthless? The campaign group – a gathering of 2,000 school principals in 80 local authorities – said: “Greater public health, the safety of students and staff should take precedence over exams.

"Public safety should not be compromised or driven by an inflexible pursuit of GCSE and high school diplomas."

Headmaster of Tanbridge House School in Horsham – and one of the WorthLess? Leader – told the Times: "There is great skepticism that exams can now be conducted fairly."

As of Monday, around 530,000 doses of the vaccine will be available for launch across the UK. More than a million patients have already received their first dose of the Pfizer / BioNTech vaccine, which was the first to be approved by the drug and healthcare regulator.

Ofsted's chief inspector Amanda Spielman said, however, that children's education cannot be "suspended" for months while vaccinations are being introduced and that time away from the classroom should be kept to an "absolute minimum," the reported Sunday Telegraph.

Child Commissioner Anne Longfield told the newspaper that schools should be the last to close and open first when it is safe to do so, adding: “I hope, for the sake of children and parents, this is measured in days, not weeks and I would be particularly interested in keeping the primaries as open as possible. & # 39;

Union leader Sir Keir Starmer said the launch of the vaccine was "our great hope", adding, "I want the government to do everything possible to harness our NHS 'exceptional talents so we can vaccinate at least two million Britons a week until the end of the month. & # 39;

But as he wrote in the Sunday Mirror, he criticized "a chaotic last-minute U-turn in schools" adding, "Parents, teachers and students are confused about who will and will not be back in school tomorrow."

National Education Union (NEW) general secretary Mary Bousted said schools should be closed for two weeks to break the chain of transmission and prevent the NHS from becoming overwhelmed.

The union, which represents the majority of teachers, has told its members that it is not safe to return to classrooms on Monday.

NAHT general secretary Paul Whiteman said the union had taken preparatory steps in legal proceedings against the Department of Education and asked them to share their scientific data on security and transmission rates.

The unions have also called for schools to reopen in Wales next week to be postponed. Laura Doel, director of the NAHT Cymru school principals union, said: "The latest data shows that much of Wales has lost control of infections."

Starting January 4th, all London elementary schools will be required to offer two weeks of distance learning to all children, with the exception of vulnerable children and those of key workers who are allowed to attend.

Mr Williamson said the January 1 decision to extend the closure to the nine remaining London boroughs and the City of London was a "last resort".

Under the government's original plan, secondary schools and colleges should be closed to most students for the first two weeks of January, while elementary schools in 50 municipalities in the south of England, including 23 London boroughs, were also asked to keep their doors closed until January 18.

The Green-led Brighton and Hove City Council has advised elementary schools in the Tier 4 area not to return in person until January 18, except for vulnerable children and key workers, although the government has allowed most schools to open in person.

Linda Bauld, professor of public health at the University of Edinburgh, said transmission among elementary school students is "still very limited" while secondary school students, especially older teens, can pass the virus on in the same way as adults.

However, health professionals have warned of increasing pressure on services. Professor Andrew Goddard, president of the Royal College of Physicians, said current case numbers from the BBC are "pretty mild" compared to expectations for a week.

(tagsToTranslate) Dailymail (t) Nachrichten (t) Coronavirus (t) London (t) NHS (t) Coronavirus Lockdowns