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Covid UK: Chris Whitty Says NHS Has Its Worst Weeks To Go With Cases Rising


What are the government rules for exercising?

You should minimize the amount of time away from your home, but you can leave home to exercise.

This should be limited to once per day and you shouldn't travel outside of your area.

You can exercise outdoors in a public place:

  • of yourself
  • with the people you live with
  • with your support bubble (if you are legally entitled to create one)
  • in a childcare bubble where childcare is offered
  • or, if you are alone, with someone from another household

This includes running, biking, hiking, and swimming, among others.

Personal training can be continued individually, unless everyone is in the same household or in the same support bubble.

Public outdoor spaces are:

  • Parks, beaches, publicly accessible landscape, forests
  • public gardens (whether or not you pay to enter)
  • the site of a cultural heritage
  • playgrounds

Matt Hancock was defending Boris Johnson tonight after he was seen in Olympic Park seven miles from Downing Street apparently breaking government recommendations – hours before he complained that people had become "complacent" about the rules.

The health minister said it is allowed to drive this distance from where you live to do sports, although he also insists that people must "stay".

But he also warned that the rules for two people from different households to exercise outdoors together could be lifted if people continued to abuse them.

"If too many people break this rule, we have to look at them, but I don't want to," Hancock said of a # 10 brief tonight.

Shortly after Mr Hancock's address, the Prime Minister released a short video that was filmed during his visit to the Bristol Vaccination Center today.

In it, he urged the British to "follow instructions to stay home, protect the NHS and save lives" as Covid continues to spread rapidly in several parts of the country.

The British shouldn't lose focus on the pandemic as the coronavirus "is still causing big problems for our NHS," Johnson added.

The country recorded a further 529 deaths from Covid today – a 30 percent increase from the 407 reported that day last week.

Today is the deadliest Monday since April 20, when 570 people lost their lives.

In a positive sign that the UK's rising case load could ease, 46,169 people tested positive for the virus today – a 20 percent decrease in one week.

Today's total number of cases marks the first number under 50,000 since December 28th.

The Prime Minister was seen wearing a hat and face mask on his bike at the venue, seven miles from Downing Street, yesterday afternoon.

A source told the Evening Standard that Mr. Johnson was training along with his security detail. Exceptionally, the Prime Minister is said to have "noticed how busy" the park was and later pointed this out at a meeting.

However, according to official government guidelines, movement should be restricted to once a day and "you should not travel outside your area". Two women were fined £ 200 each by Derbyshire Police for walking five miles from their home while officials in Whitby beat people for sledging.

On a visit to the Ashton Gate Immunization Center in Bristol that afternoon, Mr Johnson reiterated appalling news from Chris Whitty that the next few weeks will be the worst for the NHS.

"This is a very dangerous moment as everyone can feel the vaccine coming and they can see the UK are vaccinating a large number of those who need it most," said Johnson.

“I worry, and Chris worries, that this is the moment when this level of false confidence, false complacency, and when you look at what happened in the NHS, that complacency is not deserved.

He was asked by reporters why he chose to travel to Bristol instead of looking at a vaccination center near Downing Street, arguing that his trip was "essential".

In a video posted on the Prime Minister's official Twitter account tonight, which includes footage of Mr Johnson's visit to Bristol today, the Prime Minister praised the government's vaccination program.

But he warned the British that this shouldn't lead to complacency as the new variant of Covid is still spreading rapidly.

Mr. Johnson said, “Hi guys. I'm here at this amazing mass vaccination center in Bristol in a football stadium and it's one of the 50 we'll be rolling out by the end of the month to help all of the over 1,000 GP surgeries across the 233 hospital locations. plus the 200 pharmacies.

“And of course that's just the beginning when we deliver the vaccine.

“When I speak to you this morning, we've done about 2.4 million thrusts, 2 million people in the country who have already been vaccinated, and we're going to increase that massively over the next few weeks as soon as we get it, we hope by the middle February up to 15 million.

“And that is a very ambitious program. We are confident that we can do it.

"But when we meet the people, it is incredibly important that we do not lose focus on the pandemic, which unfortunately is still happening in so many parts of the country and still filling our hospitals with Covid patients who are still large, big problems for our NHS.

“So everyone has to follow the instructions. Stay home protect the NHS and save lives. & # 39;

Along with his video, the Prime Minister tweeted, “If we get bumped in the arms, we must not lose sight of the state of the pandemic – which is putting enormous pressure on our NHS.

"So please follow the rules and stay home to protect the NHS and save lives."

In another dramatic development of today's coronavirus crisis:

  • Matt Hancock reveals the UK's detailed vaccine rollout plan. The ministers promise that more than 13 million people will be insured by mid-February.
  • No. 10 ruled out immediate 24-hour bursts at the country's new vaccination centers, which opened today. He said there was no "shouting" in public accusing a lack of medicine.
  • Downing Street said the prime minister's father, Stanley Johnson, appears to be among the first to receive two coronavirus vaccines before a policy change.
  • Rishi Sunak today warned the British to prepare that the economy "gets worse before it gets better" as he said the new coronavirus lockdown will be "significant" costs and suggest tax hikes.
  • Ministers have ordered local authorities to limit the number of people allowed into stores at the same time, fearing they could become virus hotspots.
  • Union leader Sir Keir Starmer expressed concerns that the current restrictions are not severe enough, saying that open kindergartens "need to be checked" and that house tours should be reconsidered.
  • Bodies are being held in a temporary morgue in Surrey after the county hospital reaches capacity amid rising Covid case rates.

A file picture of Mr Johnson cycling in London

During a visit to the Ashton Gate Stadium vaccination center in Bristol (left) today, Boris Johnson said around 2.4 million shocks have now been administered. Right, a picture of Mr Johnson cycling in London

Health Secretary Matt Hancock said it was allowed to ride a bike seven miles from where you lived, although he also insists that people "stay".

Chris Whitty, Chief Medical Officer, went on the air to highlight the scale of the threat. He said 30,000 people are in the hospital, compared to the high of 18,000 in April

Chris Whitty, Chief Medical Officer, went on the air to highlight the scale of the threat. He said 30,000 people are in the hospital, compared to the high of 18,000 in April

An ambulance arrives at Royal London Hospital today, warning again of the spread of the virus

An ambulance arrives at Royal London Hospital today, warning again of the spread of the virus

The people on what is now Exmouth Beach in Devon when Ministers told people not to sit on benches. It is not known if they came from the same household

The people on what is now Exmouth Beach in Devon when Ministers told people not to sit on benches. It is not known if they came from the same household

Along with his video released tonight, the Prime Minister tweeted, “If we get bumped in the arms, we must not lose sight of the state of the pandemic - which is putting enormous pressure on our NHS. "So please follow the rules and stay home to protect the NHS and save lives."

Along with his video released tonight, the Prime Minister tweeted, “If we get bumped in the arms, we must not lose sight of the state of the pandemic – which is putting enormous pressure on our NHS. "So please follow the rules and stay home to protect the NHS and save lives."

Don't stop chatting with friends, says Minister

A minister today attacked people breaking the lockdown by stopping to chat with friends they met during "training".

Nadhim Zahawi was alarmed this morning in a round of interviews about the pictures of people who had gathered in parks over the weekend.

The vaccines minister declined to offer any guarantee that the current “tough” lockdown restrictions are adequate and raised concerns from those who do not follow the rules in supermarkets or exercise outside.

When asked if the current restrictions are sufficient, he told BBC Radio 4's Today program: “We don't want to take tougher action, the lockdown is tough, schools are closed, but it's important to remember that this virus loves social interactions.

“We are reviewing all the restrictions, but these are pretty difficult right now.

“I worry about supermarkets and people who actually wear masks and follow the one-way system and make sure they wait outside the supermarket when capacity is full.

"I'm worried about some of the pictures I've seen of social interactions in parks. If you need to exercise, all you can do is exercise."

Mr Zahawi said if people outside their homes should keep in mind that any interaction presents an opportunity for the virus to spread.

A source in Whitehall reported that MailOnline ministers had spoken about people being allowed to leave the house only once a week – although No. 10 today denied it was on the cards and that the focus was on strengthening enforcement and Police work lay. Other ideas include making it mandatory to wear masks outdoors.

Mr Hancock told the Downing Street briefing tonight that people need to obey the rules, adding that "stronger enforcement is needed" but it is about "how everyone acts".

And he flatly ruled out getting rid of support bladders, emphasizing that they are important for vulnerable people who live alone.

Vaccine Minister Nadhim Zahawi this morning suggested that stores be in the line of fire, stressing that everyone in supermarkets must wear masks and follow disposable systems. He appealed to people not to stop and chat with friends they meet outside of their homes – and also made it clear that sitting on park benches is not recommended during "training sessions".

Meanwhile, Downing Street couldn't tell if people could get a take-out coffee and drink it while out walking with someone in another household.

Limiting people from different "bubbles" to exercise together also appears to be in the pipeline as the government seeks ways to reduce transmission.

And in a detailed tightening, the government changed the definition of the term “close contact” so that it applies when people have been in the vicinity for more than 15 minutes over a whole day. Previously, the rule was 15 minutes of close contact at a time.

A source told Standard that the prime minister was training, adding, “But he did notice how busy the park was and he commented on this at the meeting last night.

"He was concerned about people obeying the rules and was worried after his bike ride through the park."

One witness said: “He was leisurely driving with another man in a cap and chatting while about four security guards, possibly more, cycled behind them.

Realizing the person looked like Boris, I drove past them to hear his voice and be sure it was him. It was definitely Boris.

"Given the current situation with Covid, I was shocked to see him driving around so carelessly," added the woman, who asked not to be named.

Even though he advises everyone to stay home and not leave their area, shouldn't they stay in Westminster and not travel to other districts? & # 39;

The Prime Minister's spokesman was unable to provide any information today on why Mr Johnson had gone to Stratford and why it was within the rules.

It is also not clear whether Mr Johnson was ridden to the park on his bike or rode all the way there and back.

Tim Farron, MP for Lib Dem, said, “The government's guidelines for travel to sport are as clear as mud.

“People travel hundreds of miles to the Lake District while others are scared to drive 5 minutes to the local park.

"I wrote to the prime minister asking him to give clear instructions once and for all."

Chief Medical Officer Prof. Whitty went on the air to highlight the scale of the threat. He said 30,000 people are in the hospital, compared to the high of 18,000 in April.

He urged people to remember that "any unnecessary contact" is an opportunity for the virus to spread.

He insisted that while the NHS is in "the most dangerous situation anyone can remember", vaccines mean the UK can be back to normal in "months not years" – but he warned the situation is far from it is.

The UK announced another 573 coronavirus deaths yesterday, on the highest Sunday since April and the third deadliest Sunday in the entire pandemic, as one in five people in England may have had coronavirus. In some areas of East London and Essex, it could be up to one in two people, Edge Health claims.

The infections are also still high: 54,940 were announced yesterday – for the thirteenth day in a row they were above the 50,000 mark.

Mr Johnson said it was clear to the public that the UK was in a "race against time" to get vaccines out and ease pressure on the health service.

"It is far better for people to follow the rules we have than just make new rules," he said.

Justifying his own trip from London to Bristol, Mr Johnson said it was "important that I explain to the public what we are doing to set up the mass vaccination centers".

He added, "Everyone should be wondering if they need to get out of the house, if they need to do something that could actually spread the disease."

Rishi Sunak warns that the UK economy "will get worse before it gets better" as the lockdown will incur "significant" costs

Rishi Sunak today warned the British to prepare that the economy "gets worse before it gets better" as the new coronavirus lockdown will incur "significant" costs.

Despite saying that vaccines offered "hope" and there were signs of "resilience" in UK plc, the Chancellor delivered a grim message about the extent of the devastation from the pandemic.

In a statement to MPs, he insisted that the government had rightly taken action, including offering additional grants of £ 4.6 million and providing discretionary support to affected businesses.

But Mr Sunak warned the country of impending tax hikes and spending cuts as he was determined to take action to "fix" public finances when the immediate crisis is over.

The dire assessment came when the numbers showed store visitor numbers had dropped more than a quarter in the past week as the brutal restrictions came into effect.

Mr. Johnson said, “More important than us, just bring out new rules, people have to follow the instructions.

“In supermarkets, people have to keep their distance, make sure they wear masks, and do the right thing.

“We have to enforce the rules in supermarkets. When people get takeaway drinks in cafes, they need to avoid spreading the disease there and avoid mixing too much. & # 39;

Prof. Whitty said the UK could avoid a tougher lockdown if people properly followed the rules as he described the Covid-19 death toll of 81,431 as "absolutely appalling".

He insisted it was very dangerous to meet someone from a different household, adding that the coronavirus "doesn't care if you meet your friend or family".

He told BBC Breakfast that the UK was currently at the worst of the pandemic that began last March and was asked if life would ever return to normal.

Prof. Whitty replied: "I am confident that at some point we will come back to life, there is no doubt, this is the life we ​​all want to lead."

Once the vaccines are in place, he said, “People will be able to lift the restrictions.

"It won't happen all at once, and at some point, hopefully, you will return to a life that is basically exactly the same as before."

"We are a long way from that at the moment."

He said ministers would "always look at" whether the lockdown could be tightened, but all Britons would have to comply with the rules to "help protect the NHS".

Prof. Whitty added that kindergartens are still open as the risk to children from Covid is "very low" and it is important that parents can continue to go to work.

But he urged people to "minimize their social contact," if possible, to "double" the lockdown rules, saying the new surge in the virus was "everyone's problem".

Prof. Whitty added, "Tinkering with the rules may be useful, but the most important thing is that everyone obey the spirit of the rules."

He also said the rest of this month will likely be the worst part of the pandemic as the new highly infectious variants of the virus rage across the UK.

Prof. Whitty said, “At the peak we had in April last year, we had about 18,000 people in the NHS. We currently have over 30,000 employees in the NHS as of yesterday.

"A week ago, all four of the chief physicians for England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland said, 'This will be a major crisis for the NHS if we don't evade. "

& # 39; This new variant really drives things forward in a way that the old variant – which was already very bad – couldn't.

Matt Hancock presented slides with the latest coronavirus situation tonight when he hosted a briefing on Downing Street

Matt Hancock presented slides with the latest coronavirus situation tonight when he hosted a briefing on Downing Street

“So we have a very big problem … it's a serious problem and it's increasing in every part of England.

"The next few weeks will be the worst weeks of this pandemic in terms of numbers in the NHS."

He also urged people to double down and cut unnecessary contacts.

Prof. Whitty said, “What we need to do before the vaccines work – because it will take a few weeks for this to happen – we really need to double down.

“This is everyone's problem. Every single unnecessary contact with someone is a potential link in a chain of transmission that leads to a person at risk.

"We all, as individuals, must help the NHS and our fellow citizens by minimizing unnecessary contact."

He added, "The virus can be passed on to any location where people from two different households meet."

Mr. Zahawi declined to offer any guarantee that the current “tough” lockdown restrictions are sufficient and raised concerns from those who fail to follow the rules in supermarkets or exercise outside.

When asked if the current restrictions are sufficient, he told BBC Radio 4's Today program: “We don't want to take tougher action, the lockdown is tough, schools are closed, but it's important to remember that this virus loves social interactions.

“We are reviewing all the restrictions, but these are pretty difficult right now. I worry about supermarkets and people who actually wear masks and follow the one-way system, and make sure they wait outside the supermarket when capacity is full.

"I'm worried about some of the pictures I've seen of social interactions in parks. If you need to exercise, all you can do is exercise."

Mr. Zahawi was asked on Times Radio if people could sit on park benches during training sessions.

Israel is driving the vaccine drive

Israel continues to shame the UK and the rest of the world with its 24/7 vaccination program as it starts vaccinating people at age 55.

The Middle Eastern country has made progress by squeezing every last dose out of its vaccine supply and using its efficient health system to launch a round-the-clock vaccination campaign with military assistance.

However, in the UK, a vaccine shortage is blamed for the slow introduction of the shocks, despite new hubs that want to give an injection every 45 seconds.

He replied, "Don't go out there or sit down or use the opportunity to socialize because you're helping the virus and we want to avoid that."

A spokesman for Downing Street explained in a Westminster briefing whether it was within the Covid rules for a single person to sit on a park bench: "Let me take this away and come back to you about the park bench."

When asked if someone could sit on a park bench and have a coffee according to the coronavirus regulations, the spokesman said: "We have clearly set the rules.

"We made it clear in the exception to the stay at home rule that we allow one person to meet another person for sport."

When asked if it was against the rules to go outside with a takeaway tea, the spokesman said, "Of course, going for a walk counts as exercise."

The Cabinet Office refused to deny that draconian new laws were coming. Health Secretary Matt Hancock refused to speculate when asked directly yesterday whether stricter measures – including curfews and kindergarten closings – could be put in place, saying instead the British should "follow the rules we have".

A Whitehall source told MailOnline that the changes discussed even included introducing a ban on people leaving their homes more than once a week.

But No10 sources today insisted this was out of the question and the immediate focus would be on "tougher enforcement and surveillance".

The Prime Minister's spokesman was unable to provide any information today on why Mr Johnson had gone to Stratford and why it was within the rules.

The Prime Minister's spokesman was unable to provide any information today on why Mr Johnson had gone to Stratford and why it was within the rules.

Standard reporter Sophia Sleigh saw Mr Johnson on his bike yesterday

Mr Johnson's bike ride received criticism on social media this afternoon as Downing Street remained silent

Standard reporter Sophia Sleigh saw Mr Johnson on his bike yesterday (left). The ride received criticism on social media this afternoon as Downing Street remained silent

Rishi Sunak today warned the British to prepare that the economy "gets worse before it gets better" as the new coronavirus lockdown will incur "significant" costs

Rishi Sunak today warned the British to prepare that the economy "gets worse before it gets better" as the new coronavirus lockdown will incur "significant" costs

Vaccine Minister Nadhim Zahawi this morning suggested that stores be in the line of fire, stressing that everyone in supermarkets must wear masks and follow disposable systems

Vaccine Minister Nadhim Zahawi this morning suggested that stores be in the line of fire, stressing that everyone in supermarkets must wear masks and follow disposable systems

MEPs should wear masks in the Commons Chamber

MPs were advised to wear face masks "wherever possible" in the Lower House Chamber.

Speaker Sir Lindsay Hoyle suggested that the exception should be when MPs are called to speak.

Members of Parliament have been asked to wear masks in recent months, although the speaker's words go a step further by urging MPs to wear face-covering in the Chamber.

The number of MPs on the floor of the house was limited to 50 during the Covid-19 pandemic, while others contributed virtually via Zoom.

Sir Lindsay opened the store and told the Commons, “All I can do is tell members, wherever possible, always try to wear masks unless, of course, when we speak.

"So please remember."

According to the rules in place, Britons can train with another person or with their household or their support bubble.

But a government source told the Daily Telegraph that the rule "is used as an excuse for people to have coffee with their friends in the park" and could be tightened.

The source said the two-person, two-household rule for exercise is for people's mental health, especially the elderly who don't want to run to see anyone.

But many use their "imagination" to do what they want.

Their concern arose when hordes of people flocked to the beaches and town over the weekend, despite Boris Johnson's requests that families stay home and help control the rapidly spreading mutant variant of Covid.

The officials are also said to encourage businesses and workplaces to improve their social distancing.

Supermarkets will be a focal point of the recent government push, with many feared that lax enforcement of the rules poses risk to shoppers.

Lack of vaccines blamed for not having a 24 hour jab rollout

The UK vaccines minister today blamed a shortage of Covid-19 vaccines for not having round-the-clock bumps across the country when England's new mass vaccination centers opened this morning, offering an injection every 45 seconds.

Nadhim Zahawi also admitted that most people currently have "about a 45 minute drive" to the seven NHS locations that opened their doors this morning, most of which are over 80 years old because not enough GPs are attending.

Mr. Zahawi said the introduction of the vaccine could happen 24 hours a day "if we have to," but only if the vaccine concentration is high enough. He also suggested that the mostly elderly Britons who now need to be vaccinated are unlikely to want an appointment in the middle of the night, which means the current opening hours will continue to be 8am to 8pm.

When asked if it can be given day and night if there is enough vaccine, he told BBC Radio 4's Today program: "If we have to work around the clock, we must work 24 hours a day, to make sure we vaccinate as soon as we can '.

Fears remain that the government is over-promising how much can realistically be delivered – or not pushing hard enough to vaccinate the entire population and free the UK from lockdown.

Union leader Sir Keir Starmer said today that Boris Johnson's "first priority" must be to speed up the program to "around the clock", adding, "This is now the only way out of the darkness." Sir Keir also believes the government's 2 million shocks a week should double to 4 million by the end of February.

Stricter punishment for rule violations is also being considered.

Union leader Sir Keir Starmer today expressed concern that the current restrictions are not severe enough. He said that open kindergartens "need to be checked" and suggested that home tours be reconsidered.

"So we are in an exceptional situation in which, having achieved a position at least as serious, if not more serious than last March, we have fewer restrictions and need them as soon as possible," he said a speech.

"I think the vast majority of the public obey the rules."

However, Deputy Police Commissioner of Devon and Cornwall Paul Netherton warned that people are fed up with lockdown restrictions and compliance has fallen.

"What happens is that people start disobeying the rules, they start thinking," How can I get away with the rules? "He said to BBC Breakfast.

When asked if it was more difficult to get people to follow the rules of the current lockdown compared to the previous two, he said, “Yeah, I think people are getting tired of it.

"I can understand that, but we have to be firm, we have to save lives, we have to make sure that people stay separate, isolate themselves and stay at home."

To demonstrate the gravity of the situation, MPs have been advised to wear face masks wherever possible in the Chamber of Commons.

Speaker Sir Lindsay Hoyle suggested that the exception should be when MPs are called to speak.

Members of Parliament have been asked to wear masks in recent months, although the speaker's words go a step further by urging MPs to wear face-covering in the Chamber.

The number of MPs on the floor of the house was limited to 50 during the Covid-19 pandemic, while others contributed virtually via Zoom.

Sir Lindsay opened the store and told the Commons, “All I can do is tell members, wherever possible, always try to wear masks unless, of course, when we speak.

"So please remember."

A senior government scientific adviser said yesterday it would become clear whether the current lockdown would reduce the spread of coronavirus cases – with deaths over 80,000 – within 14 days.

Professor Peter Horby, Chair of the Advisory Group on New and Emerging Respiratory Virus Threats (NERVTAG) said: "Unfortunately, if there is any evidence that this is not the case, we need to be even stricter."

Mr Hancock appeared on the BBC's Andrew Marr program yesterday morning asking about a range of actions that could be taken.

Mr. Marr asked, “Are you considering things like curfews, closing kindergartens, quitting some of those support bladders, returning to just an hour of outdoor exercise, and asking people to wear masks in crowded outdoor areas? Are these the things to consider if you can't get this under control very quickly? & # 39;

But Mr. Hancock replied, “Well, I don't want to speculate because the main message is not whether the government will continue to strengthen the rules. The most important thing is that people stay home and follow the rules that we have. & # 39;

What is a "reasonable excuse" to go outside?

According to the rules in England, you can only leave your home if you have a "reasonable excuse". This is regulated by law. The police can take action against you if you leave home without a “reasonable apology” and impose a fine (Fixed Penalty). You can get a fixed penalty of £ 200 for the first offense, which doubles to a maximum of £ 6,400 for further offenses.

A "reasonable apology" includes:

  • Work – You can only leave home for work if it is inappropriate for you to do your work from home
  • Volunteering – You can also leave home to do volunteer or community service
  • Essential Activities – You can leave home to buy things in stores or get services. You can also leave home to do these things on behalf of a disabled or vulnerable person, or someone who is self-isolating
  • Education and Child Care – You can only leave home for education, registered child care, and supervised activities for children that you are eligible to attend.
  • Meeting with Others and Care – You can leave home to visit people in your support bubble (if you are legally entitled to form one), to informally care for children under the age of 14 under a child care bubble (e.g. to To enable parents to work) to look after disabled or vulnerable people
  • Exercise – You can continue to exercise alone, with someone else, or with your household or support bladder and not outside of your area. The government advises you to exercise only once a day, but the law doesn't restrict it.
  • Medical Reasons – You can leave home for medical reasons, including a COVID-19 test for medical appointments and emergencies
  • Harm and Compassionate Visits – You can leave the house to be with someone who is giving birth, to avoid injury or illness, or to avoid the risk of harm (such as domestic violence).
  • You can also leave the house to visit someone who is dying, someone in a nursing home (if this is permitted under the guidance of the nursing home), a hospice or hospital, or to accompany them to a doctor's appointment
  • Animal welfare reasons – You can leave your home for animal welfare reasons, e.g. B. To contact a veterinary service for advice or treatment
  • Communal Worship and Life Events – You can leave home to attend or attend a place of worship for communal worship, funeral or event related to a death, burial site or memorial garden, or to attend a wedding ceremony.

There are other reasonable excuses.

For example, you may leave your home to comply with legal obligations or to engage in activities related to buying, selling, renting or renting residential property, or when it is reasonable to vote in an election or referendum. In Scotland, coronavirus legislation gives the police the power to force people into people's homes if a “reasoned suspicion” rule is violated. In England, however, they can only enter under "exceptional circumstances" even if they believe someone inside is contagious. Otherwise they need an arrest warrant.

The shops ordered their Covid rules to be tightened

Shoppers face a return to long queues outside the supermarkets as a new approach is planned.

Ministers have ordered local authorities to limit the number of people who can enter stores at the same time, amid concerns that they could become virus hotspots.

Other businesses that are not classified as material or are not operated "Covid-safe" could be closed.

A source from Whitehall said: "There is a feeling that people are doing what they want again right now and local authorities will be working with supermarkets and other open places to make sure they are still Covid safe." That could well mean a return to capacity limits. & # 39;

The move comes amid growing concerns that the third lockdown will not be monitored nearly as closely as the first was last year.

Professor Horby told the same program that the new variant discovered in Kent, which appears to be far more transmissible than older strains of Covid, made the situation "riskier".

When asked what it means to be “even stricter” in practice, he said, “I think the principles haven't changed. There is no evidence to suggest that this virus is transmitted any other way. It's just that when people have it, they have more virus, so any contact is riskier.

So the same principles apply. The point is to reduce social contact, and if there is inevitable social contact, be as strict as possible with distance and face masks, hand hygiene and ventilation, etc. & # 39;

Mr. Marr asked, “So when I think back to March and spring I can remember that for example you could only go out for an hour, for example for any kind of exercise, and there were much stricter rules for meeting with other people. Are these the things we might see if we don't get it under control now? & # 39;

To which he said: “Yes, that's right. You know, we have seen in the past that very strict measures work and if the current measures are not strict enough, it is clear what we have to do. & # 39;

Meanwhile, union leader Sir Keir Starmer warned that if they don't prevent spikes in Covid cases, lockdown rules may need to be tightened – as he called for kindergartens to close immediately.

He attacked "mixed messages" from ministers about the lockdown restrictions when he asked Boris Johnson to hold daily press conferences until the lockdown is lifted.

The UK's Covid death toll topped 80,000 after a further 1,035 deaths yesterday, adding to fears that the total will exceed 100,000 by the end of the month.

Sir Keir appeared on the BBC's Andrew Marr program and said, “They are tough and necessary. You can't be tough enough.

“In a sense, I think the most important thing is that people get this message about staying at home.

“And it's up to the government to get that message out all the time. I'm afraid we've had mixed messages over the past nine months as to why we have a problem.

"I want to see the Prime Minister hold a press conference every day to make sure the message gets through absolutely."

Priti Patel defended the police when they began strictly enforcing Covid rules, which include fines of £ 200 and less tolerance for rule violations.

The Home Secretary warned officials "will not hesitate" to take action as the rising number of new Covid-19 cases proved the need for "strong enforcement" in cases where people were clearly breaking the rules .

Mr Hancock told Sky & # 39; s Ridge on Sunday that more people are obeying the rules than when there was lockdown in November, but added, “I will definitely be helping the police. The challenge here is that any flex can be fatal.

& # 39; You could look at the rules and think & # 39; & # 39; Well it doesn't matter so much whether I do this or that & # 39; & # 39; but these rules are not there as boundaries to be moved, they are the boundary of what people should do. & # 39;

When asked about the prospect of tighter restrictions later at Marr, he added: “I don't want to speculate because the main message is not whether the government will continue to strengthen the rules.

“The most important thing is that people stay home and follow the rules that we have.

"And that's the most important thing we can do together as a society in terms of the extent of the case impact."

Mr. Hancock, who videolinked the interview from home, added, “It's hard, it's not easy. But if there is something you can do from home and don't have to go outside of your home, this is what you should do.

"People not only have to obey the letter of the rules, they also have to follow the Spirit and play their part."

Sir Keir said kindergartens "should probably close". Elementary and secondary schools were closed during the lockdown, but preschools remain open to younger children.

He told the BBC: “I think there is a reason to go to kindergartens. We talk to the scientists about it.

"I think people are surprised that elementary schools were closed but kindergartens weren't."

He added, "I think they should probably be closed, I want to talk to the scientists about it."

He said adhering to the goals of the vaccination program is the best way to get schools back open.

But he said classroom reopening needn't be made conditional on teachers being vaccinated.

"We'd have to look at all of the criteria, but the most important thing is the vaccination program," he said.

"It is very difficult to see how we can begin to lift restrictions in a meaningful way until the vaccination program, at least the first part of it, is successfully implemented."

Urged when asked whether reopening depends on teachers being vaccinated, he added, “No, I don't know that it necessarily does, although it would be a good thing if it could happen.

“This argument that there are sectors where there is a very strong argument in favor of vaccination for obvious reasons, and I understand that, and we're going to have this to do justice to that, quite frankly.

"But for now we need to focus on those who are most likely to go to the hospital and tragically die."

How Much Harder Could Lockdown Get? OUTDOOR masks, closed nurseries and support bladders ARE FORBIDDEN among the options

The government has a number of options to tighten England's third national lockdown, forcing people to wear masks outside and closing kindergartens.

Other options include banning support bubbles, re-closing places of worship, and even being able to exercise just once a week.

Vaccine Minister Nadhim Zahawi today voiced concerns that people are not following the rules in supermarkets and exercising closely enough.

There are increasing suggestions that the restrictions may need to be tightened as the government has launched an initiative to ensure the public is abiding by the rules.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson reportedly discussed the prospect of tighter controls to ensure the public was complying with restrictions.

And England's Chief Medical Officer Professor Chris Whitty today urged the public to stay home unless you absolutely have to go out.

Health Secretary Matt Hancock warned "Any Flex can be fatal" when yesterday he backed police enforcement of the lockdown.

Here MailOnline is exploring some of the ways to tighten the blocking:

Leave the house once a week?

Current training regulations for England mean that you can go out once a day as long as you wish to train alone or with someone else.

However, the government fears that the new lockdown rules will be exploited by people to meet friends for a coffee or an alcoholic drink in the park.

It is currently illegal to meet people "socially" – and you cannot leave your home to rest or relax. eg a picnic or a social meeting ”.

However, rules could be tightened to prevent people from seeing others outdoors – similar to the first few months of the first lockdown in March last year.

A government source told the Daily Telegraph: "Currently, people are using the lockdown waiver to basically connect with friends."

Another restriction could be that exercise is limited to just one hour per day to reduce the number of people someone could come into contact with.

Eine Quelle hat MailOnline sogar vorgeschlagen, die Bewegung im Freien auf nur einmal pro Woche zu beschränken, obwohl dies schwierig durchzusetzen wäre, wenn die Leute sagen könnten, sie würden für wichtige Einkäufe ausgehen.

Professor Chris Whitty, Chief Medical Officer, sagte heute Morgen gegenüber BBC Radio 4, dass ein flüchtiger Kontakt mit jemandem, wie einem vorbeirennenden Jogger, ein „äußerst geringes Risiko“ darstellt.

Ausgangssperre über Nacht

Derzeit gibt es keine Begrenzung für die Tageszeit, zu der Personen während der Sperrung aus ihren Häusern dürfen, um Sport zu treiben oder andere gesetzlich zulässige Aktivitäten auszuführen.

Eine Ausgangssperre ist jedoch eine Maßnahme, die in Betracht gezogen werden könnte, um die Gelegenheit für Menschen zu verringern, sich zu treffen – und wurde bisher von Boris Johnson nicht ausgeschlossen.

Es würde wahrscheinlich Ausnahmen für Schlüsselkräfte geben, die zur und von der Arbeit reisen, aber die öffentlichen Verkehrsmittel könnten während der Sperrstunde reduziert werden, um Fahrten zu verhindern.

Das nächstgelegene Großbritannien, das bisher zu einer Ausgangssperre gekommen ist, ist das Öffnungslimit für Pubs und Restaurants um 22.00 Uhr, das später auf 23.00 Uhr verlängert wurde, wobei die letzten Bestellungen bis 22.00 Uhr eingegangen sind.

In anderen Ländern Europas gibt es bereits Ausgangssperren, beispielsweise in Frankreich, wo es von 20 bis 6 Uhr morgens aktiv ist, aber zwei Stunden früher in Marseille und Straßburg beginnt.

Schließung von nurseries

In den letzten Tagen hat der Gewerkschaftsführer Sir Keir Starmer gefordert, dass Kindergärten im ganzen Land zusammen mit Grund- und weiterführenden Schulen geschlossen werden.

Die meisten infizierten Kinder zeigen keine Symptome des Coronavirus und der Chief Medical Officer Chris Whitty sagte heute, dass das Risiko für Kinder "sehr gering" sei.

Aber Sir Keir sagte, Kindergärten sollten "wahrscheinlich geschlossen werden" und fügte hinzu: "Ich denke, es gibt einen Grund, Kindergärten zu betrachten, wir sprechen mit den Wissenschaftlern darüber."

Die Early Years Alliance hat die Regierung aufgefordert, zu erklären, wie Kindergärten sicher sein können, während die Grundschulen geschlossen bleiben müssen.

Die Schulen sind derzeit nur für schutzbedürftige Schüler und Kinder von Schlüsselkräften geöffnet, und es besteht die Möglichkeit, dass dies auf Kindergärten ausgedehnt wird.

Der Minister des Kabinetts, Michael Gove, hat jedoch darauf bestanden, dass es wichtig sei, die Kindergärten offen zu halten, damit die Eltern der Kinder weiterhin arbeiten können.

Kehren Sie vor den Supermärkten in die Warteschlange zurück

Die Käufer stehen vor einer Rückkehr zu langen Warteschlangen außerhalb der Supermärkte, da ein neues Vorgehen geplant ist. Weitere Geschäfte, die als nicht wesentlich eingestuft werden, könnten geschlossen werden.

Die Minister haben den lokalen Behörden befohlen, die Anzahl der Personen, die gleichzeitig in Geschäfte dürfen, zu begrenzen, da befürchtet wird, dass sie zu Virus-Hotspots werden könnten.

Es wurden bereits Bedenken hinsichtlich Käufern geäußert, die in einigen Geschäften nach nicht wesentlichen Produkten suchen, z. B. nach Einkäufen bei Homebase für Pflanzen oder M & S für Kleidung.

Eine Quelle aus Whitehall schlug vor, dass es zu einer Rückkehr zu Kapazitätsgrenzen kommen könnte, und sagte: "Es besteht das Gefühl, dass die Leute einfach wieder tun, was sie wollen."

Zu Beginn der ersten Sperrung im März letzten Jahres bildeten sich in den Supermärkten große Warteschlangen, und bestimmte Produkte wurden rationiert, als die Kunden in Panik gerieten.

Impfstoffminister Nadhim Zahawi sagte heute Morgen gegenüber Sky News: "In Supermärkten müssen wir sicherstellen, dass die Menschen tatsächlich Masken tragen und die Einwegregel befolgen."

Das Tragen von Masken im Freien erzwingen

Gesichtsmasken sind in Innenräumen mit öffentlichen Verkehrsmitteln sowie in Kirchen und Geschäften obligatorisch, sofern Sie keine Ausnahmeregelung haben. Diese Regel kann jedoch auch auf Außenbereiche ausgedehnt werden.

Der Londoner Bürgermeister Sadiq Khan forderte die Regierung am vergangenen Freitag auf, Masken "im Freien in Warteschlangen, Straßen und anderen überfüllten Räumen im Freien" obligatorisch zu machen.

Professor Chris Whitty, Chief Medical Officer, sagte heute Morgen gegenüber BBC Radio 4, dass es im Freien bestimmte Einstellungen geben könnte, in denen Menschen Masken tragen könnten.

Er sagte: „Wenn Menschen zum Beispiel in einer Warteschlange zusammengedrängt sind … wenn sie wirklich um einen Marktstand oder so zusammengekauert sind, ist das ein Risiko für diesen Virus.

"Und Menschen in dieser Situation mögen eine Logik für Menschen haben, die über das Tragen von Masken nachdenken, aber eine viel bessere Sache ist es, das Ausgehen zu minimieren."

Stützblasen verbieten

Unterstützungsblasen wurden erstmals am 13. Juni letzten Jahres in England eingeführt, was bedeutet, dass Erwachsene, die alleine leben, das Haus eines anderen besuchen und über Nacht bleiben können.

Diese wurden aufgrund von Bedenken hinsichtlich der psychischen Gesundheit und der Isolation der allein lebenden Personen ausgelöst und waren in den ersten drei Monaten der Sperrung nicht vorhanden.

Die wissenschaftliche Beratergruppe für Notfälle hat jedoch von ihrer Einführung im vergangenen Mai abgeraten – und die Regierung hat nicht ausgeschlossen, sie erneut zu entfernen.

Aber sie zu verschrotten wäre wahrscheinlich ein zutiefst unpopulärer Schritt, insbesondere unter denen, die sich auf sie als wichtige Kontaktquelle verlassen, wie zum Beispiel einem einzelnen älteren Großelternteil.

Die Regierung weist darauf hin, dass sich in einem örtlichen Haushalt Blasen bilden und diejenigen, die ab dem 2. Dezember letzten Jahres ein Kind unter einem Jahr haben, als alleinstehende Erwachsene gelten.

Menschen dürfen auch als alleinstehende Erwachsene eine Unterstützungsblase bilden, wenn sie 16 oder 17 Jahre alt sind und mit anderen im gleichen Alter und ohne Erwachsene leben.

Kirchen schließen

Eines der überraschendsten Elemente der dritten nationalen Sperrung ist, dass Kultstätten für privates Gebet und kollektiven Gottesdienst offen bleiben durften.

Es ist ein seltenes Beispiel für Versammlungen mit mehreren Haushalten, die noch erlaubt sind, und eine andere Politik als das Verbot während der beiden vorherigen Sperren.

Aber der Londoner Bürgermeister Sadiq Khan und die Ratsvorsitzenden haben gefordert, dass die Kultstätten wieder geschlossen werden, und dieser Druck könnte dazu führen, dass die Regierung ihre Politik ändert.

Die Wissenschaftliche Beratergruppe für Notfälle hat vorgeschlagen, dass die Schließung von Kultstätten die R-Rate um 0,1 senken könnte, aber die Minister zögern, dies zu tun.

Der Minister des Kabinetts, Michael Gove, sagte: „Es ist absolut wichtig, dass die Traditionen des öffentlichen Gottesdienstes fortgesetzt werden können. Ich denke, es ist ein sehr wichtiger Teil des Lebens der Nation. & # 39;

Religiöse Führer haben die Menschen aufgefordert, „enorme Sorgfalt“ walten zu lassen, wenn sie zu einem Ort der Anbetung gehen, und den Abschirmern geraten, zu Hause zu bleiben, wenn sich die Pandemie verschärft.

Meanwhile some vicars have criticised the Church of England for not taking a harder stance on closures, saying that it 'doesn't make sense' for churches to stay open.

Face coverings in offices

Ministers are said to be considering bringing in rules requiring people to wear masks in workplaces as well as schools.

Government advice currently states the best ways to minimise the risk of getting the virus at work are social distancing, good hygiene and protective screens.

But Communities Secretary Robert Jenrick said last October that masks 'have some benefit' at work and suggested the Government should take this into consideration'.

However if this rule was brought in now, it would only affect a low proportion of the country still in offices – with people urged to work from home if they can.

The Department of Health and Social Care has said it is guided by advice of scientific and medical experts and keeps the evidence on masks 'under constant review.'

Redefining key workers

Around one third of the UK workforce are key workers totalling 10.61 million people – including NHS staff, food manufacturers, building workers and warehouse workers.

Other key workers include staff needed for 'essential financial services provision', 'payments providers' and those in 'information technology and data infrastructure'.

But scientific advice group Independent Sage has called on the Government to narrow the definition of key workers in a bid to reduce numbers of pupils in school.

Calls to limit numbers of pupils receiving face-to-face lessons are growing as attendance levels surge to more than 50 per cent in some schools.

But all key workers unable to work from home will soon be eligible for a test twice a week to try to 'break the chain' of transmission by asymptomatic carriers.

The announcement yesterday by Matt Hancock will make lateral flow tests – which take 30 minutes to get a result – a key way to avoid tightening the lockdown.

Key workers have around 29 daily contacts with other people, seven times as many as someone working from home. Just one in six key workers can work from home.

Increased enforcement

Health Secretary Matt Hancock has warned that 'every flex can be fatal' as he backed more stringent enforcement of the lockdown by police yesterday.

Police have been fighting to keep Britons from flouting the rules as thousands flocked to beauty spots at the weekend despite warnings over a stricter crackdown.

Officers have been told to issue a verbal warning before fining those in breach of the rules £200 as Home Secretary Priti Patel warned they won't hesitate to take action.

Police chiefs have urged the public to be more responsible and to stop trying to find a way around the rules, but enforcement could still become tougher still.

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