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Covid Lockdown UK: Boris Johnson says tougher lockdown is imminent


Former Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt today joined calls for an immediate national lockdown with schools and borders closed and a ban on any household mixing.

Mr Hunt warned that the mutant Covid had put pressure on the NHS compared to normal winters and the government could not afford to wait another day.

The dramatic intervention came after Boris Johnson confirmed that tougher measures were coming soon – but hinted that he would stick to the tier system in England rather than a blanket approach.

The Prime Minister said the government would do "whatever is necessary" when he warned the British that the situation could drag on for months, despite the optimism sparked by the first Oxford / AstraZeneca vaccine doses.

During a visit to Chase Farm Hospital in north London, Mr. Johnson warned of "tough, tough" weeks. He added, "If you look at the numbers, there is no question that we need to take stricter measures and we will announce these in due course."

Part of a growing group of Conservative MPs including former No. 10 Advisor Neil O'Brien, Mr Hunt is pushing for immediate action to combat the rise in the coronavirus. Labor is also pushing for pressure, with Sadiq Khan saying Mr Hunt is "spot on".

The former cabinet minister said: "For those who argue, winter in the NHS is always like this: you are wrong. I faced four major winter crises as Health Sec, and the situation is now worse than any. & # 39;

Mr Hunt said the "main lesson" from the pandemic was that if countries "act early and decisively", countries can "save lives and get their economies back to normal faster".

"We can't afford to wait: all schools should be closed, international travel stopped, the mix of households limited and the animal system checked so that the highest level really lowers the infection rate," said Hunt.

"The good news is that unlike before, these restrictions will be limited to around 12 weeks to get the vaccine to those most susceptible to Covid. So there is light at the end of the tunnel," Hunt said.

Meanwhile, parents face chaos as many elementary schools contradict government orders to return after the Christmas break – with speculation that ministers will be forced into another humiliating U-turn.

SAGE has warned that it is likely impossible to control the new coronavirus variant while it remains open – although experts say a full shutdown is still not enough to keep the & # 39; R & # 39; reproduction rate below one bring to.

Nicola Sturgeon announced drastic action in the Scottish Parliament this afternoon. A home stay will be mandated by law from midnight, and schools north of the border are slated to remain closed until February.

But the idea of ​​tightening restrictions has sparked anger among other Tory MPs, who insist that the country's experience with the pandemic shows lockdowns are not working and crippling the economy.

Another gloomy day of the coronavirus mayhem:

  • Mr Hancock said he was "incredibly concerned" about a new South African variant of the coronavirus that experts fear will not be caught in the current crop of vaccines.
  • Brian Pinker, an 82-year-old retired maintenance manager from Oxford, was the first to receive the AstraZeneca vaccine outside of studies.
  • The teaching unions launched a concerted offer to close all classrooms despite Boris Johnson asking to stay open. Millions of parents have had to teach their children at home for at least a fortnight, often with only a few hours' lead time.
  • The latest data shows that the number of confirmed coronavirus patients in hospital in England rose 33 percent between Christmas and January 2nd.

Boris Johnson gives a thumbs up as he has his temperature checked on a visit to Chase Farm Hospital in north London today while the Oxford University / AstraZeneca vaccine hits the market

Jeremy Hunt warned that the mutated Covid had put pressure on the NHS compared to normal winters and that the government couldn't afford to wait another day

Jeremy Hunt warned that the mutated Covid had put pressure on the NHS compared to normal winters and that the government couldn't afford to wait another day

Three quarters of England are already subject to Tier 4, where only important shops such as supermarkets are allowed to open and people should stay at home

Three quarters of England are already subject to Tier 4, where only important shops such as supermarkets are allowed to open and people should stay at home

Official numbers yesterday showed an additional 54,990 laboratory-confirmed cases of coronavirus in the UK, an 80 percent increase from 30,501 last week, while the death toll rose 43 percent to 454 last Sunday

Official numbers yesterday showed an additional 54,990 laboratory-confirmed cases of coronavirus in the UK, an 80 percent increase from 30,501 last week, while the death toll rose 43 percent to 454 last Sunday

How could Boris strengthen the suspension in England?

Boris Johnson has stated that stricter coronavirus restrictions are coming soon.

So far, however, there has been no clarity as to what they might look like, as ministers seem to be arguing behind the scenes.

Here are some of the options:

Go up the stairs

About three-quarters of England are already subject to the highest Tier 4 restrictions – the rest in Tier 3, aside from 2,000 people in the Isles of Scilly.

Matt Hancock suggested this morning that Tier 3 is no longer powerful enough to contain mutated Covid. However, he indicated that Tier 4 controls could be done if people followed the rules more closely.

This opened up the possibility that enforcement could escalate – something a number of Tory MPs would support.

Within the existing structure, more elementary and secondary schools could also be closed by designating more areas as emergency zones with high infection.

However, many scientists don't believe that even then, the curbs would be strong enough to stop the spread.

And there is growing fear that the outbreak will be fueled by people traveling between the planes.

National lockdown

Jeremy Hunt, some scientists and Labor have pushed for a blanket lockdown similar to the one imposed in March.

This could result in all schools being closed immediately and tighter limits on retail – such as shopping centers. B. Garden Center – apply.

There is an option to limit the number of times people can exercise on a daily basis – like in March – and a more comprehensive crackdown on household shuffling could block one-on-one outdoor shuffling.

Strengthening the legal framework with provisions for even stricter penalties for violating the rules could help compliance, but would encourage more cries of protest from libertarians.

Ban on international travel

There are a variety of other options that can be taken either alongside a national lockdown or within the animal system.

Jeremy Hunt's plan is to close the UK's borders to all major international travel.

There has been some confusion that, unlike other countries, the UK has never insisted on negative coronavirus tests for arrivals. Ministers argue that individual tests are not preferable to quarantine as they do not capture early-stage cases.

Restrictions at the border could help prevent the Kent variant from spreading, but could also provide protection from the South African tribe, who are viewed as an even greater threat.

Curfews

Downing Street has greatly downplayed the idea of ​​curfews, which would prevent people from going outside after a certain amount of time in the evening.

Again, there would be a very strong reaction from libertarians, including a large number of Tory MPs.

However, curfews have been used in other countries.

They could make it easier for the police to identify and deal with people who break the rules.

Previously, Matt Hancock had suggested that the first step would be to escalate even more parts of the country into Tier 4. Tier 3 seemed unable to hold back the more contagious version of the deadly disease.

He insisted that part of the problem was caused by people who did not obey the rules and urged some MPs to give the police more powers.

However, there are questions about how much more impact an expansion of Tier 4 coverage can have, as three-quarters of England are already under the hardest bracket where only essential stores like supermarkets are allowed to open and people are supposed to stay at home.

Mr Johnson tried to get a positive grade this morning and promised that vaccination numbers would go up massively.

He added, “A massive ramp-up operation is currently underway.

"The rate-limiting factor now is not the delivery of vaccines, although we want it to be faster, but rather that they be properly tested and sent to the NHS."

“It's not the ability to distribute the vaccine, it's not the lack of staff.

& # 39; It is being tested properly. That will increase in the coming weeks. & # 39;

When asked in a round of interviews about the prospect of a national lockdown, Hancock said, “We are not ruling anything out and have shown repeatedly that we will look at public health advice and follow public health advice on what to do is necessary to control the spread of the disease. "

When asked if changes could be announced in the next 24 hours, he replied, "We have shown that we are ready to move incredibly quickly … We look at the data every day."

Mr Hancock said the "old animal system was no longer strong enough" because the new variant was "much easier to catch, much more transferable and we are now seeing the effects in many different parts of the country". .

When asked on Sky News whether Tier 4 restrictions work, Hancock said, “Honestly, it's people's behavior. Of course, what matters are the rules that we have put in place, but it's also about how people act.

"And to be honest, I would say this: It is important that everyone in the country does everything possible to reduce the spread of the virus."

In a stark message about the length of the struggle Britain is facing, Hancock said the problem is "how we as a society together keep this under control for the next few months … until the vaccines can keep us safe".

Cabinet sources said they expected the government's "Covid-O" committee, which takes decisions on lockdown restrictions, to meet today to decide next steps.

Mr Johnson said he was also considering further school closings with possible changes by the end of the week.

But Mr Hancock said this morning that people should continue to obey the rules – which means most primaries should be back this week.

He told Times Radio that people understood why the government was changing its position.

He said: “One of the big challenges in the midst of a pandemic is that data, and therefore public health recommendations, are rightly changing and we need to change our position.

“One of the interesting things I've noticed as Minister of Health last year is that people understand, right?

“People understand that the virus is moving – we've seen this new twist make things much, much harder because it's so much easier to spread, and then we need to update our position based on updated public health recommendations .

"In schools, we should follow this public health advice."

Health Secretary Matt Hancock warned the British that despite the optimism sparked by the administration of the first Oxford / AstraZeneca vaccine doses, months of tighter restrictions would be needed

Health Secretary Matt Hancock warned the British that despite the optimism sparked by the administration of the first Oxford / AstraZeneca vaccine doses, months of tighter restrictions would be needed

The 82-year-old dialysis patient is the first Briton to have an Oxford stitch outside of the studies

The UK today began handing out Oxford's groundbreaking Covid vaccine at what has been called a "crucial moment" in the fight against the pandemic. An 82-year-old dialysis patient was the first to receive the sting.

Brian Pinker, a retired maintenance manager who describes himself as being born and raised in Oxford, said he was "so pleased" to receive the vaccine and "really proud" that it was developed in his city.

Mr Pinker, who is now looking forward to his 48th wedding anniversary with Ms Shirley next month, received the coronavirus vaccine at 7:30 a.m. at Churchill Hospital in Oxford.

In the largest vaccination drive in British history, half a million doses of the Oxford University / AstraZeneca Jab will be made available to people in need this week. "Tens of millions" are promised by April.

AstraZeneca bosses had previously suggested finishing up to 2 million cans a week by mid-January, and officials have promised to deliver the puffs as soon as possible.

That ambitious target may be further away than hoped, however, with fears the UK won't get enough supplies until February. Matt Hancock announced today that increasing the country's manufacturing capacity is "a major medium-term project".

And he said the "bureaucracy" associated with signing up as a voluntary vaccine will be cut after it was revealed last week that thousands of retired medics trying to hand out the jostles were tied to red tape.

In a joint statement, however, the education unions said that employees were at "serious risk of infection".

The statement signed by GMB, NAHT, NASUWT, NEU, Unison and Unite states: “The government's chaotic approach to the opening of schools has confused teachers, school staff and parents alike.

“If all students are brought back to the classroom when the infection rate is so high, then education workers are at serious health risk and could trigger the pandemic.

"Unions have called for a break in reopening schools to other than vulnerable children and children of key workers and a transition to distance learning for all while Covid-backed work regulations are reviewed. All school workers who continue to work in schools should be given priority access to Covid-19 vaccinations.

"Rather than casually claiming that schools are safe, the Prime Minister should sit down with unions to discuss a common approach to ensuring safe working practices in all schools and prioritizing so that all students have the equipment and access they need need to maintain a high standard. " Distance learning until the safety of you and the staff at your school is ensured. & # 39;

The Labor chief of Birmingham City Council has joined calls for a new lockdown amid rising case rates.

Speaking to BBC Radio WM, Cllr Ian Ward said the city's 7-day case rate had increased 36 percent over the past week.

He added: “The NHS here in town is under a lot of pressure. Birmingham University Hospital occupied 98 percent of its ICU beds and Sandwell and City (Hospital Trust) occupied 100 percent of its ICU beds.

"We need decisive action now, and the government must act early and be one step ahead of the curve."

The UK today began handing out Oxford's groundbreaking Covid vaccine at what has been called a "crucial moment" in the fight against the pandemic. An 82-year-old dialysis patient was the first to receive the sting.

Brian Pinker, a retired maintenance manager who describes himself as being born and raised in Oxford, said he was "so pleased" to receive the vaccine and "really proud" that it was developed in his city.

Mr Pinker, who is now looking forward to his 48th wedding anniversary with Ms Shirley next month, received the coronavirus vaccine at 7:30 a.m. at Churchill Hospital in Oxford.

Teaching unions are trying to close classrooms

Today's unions have come together to try to close all classrooms when headmasters enamored Boris Johnson's plea to stay open en masse. Millions of parents had to teach their children at home for at least fourteen days, often just a few hours in advance.

Many school principals who have been ordered to stay open have decided to close their gates anyway this morning despite the Prime Minister's insistence that "schools are safe" as all UK teaching unions have been calling for classes to be suspended until staff are vaccinated .

In a joint statement, the leaders of the unions GMB, NAHT, NASUWT, NEU, UNISON and Unite have stated that they want "an immediate nationwide transition to distance learning for all students in elementary, secondary and special schools and colleges". According to the NEW, 6,000 elementary schools have learned from employees that it is “unsafe” to come to work.

School closings are turning millions of children over to "inferior" online learning experts who say they can "reset" childhood years, especially those from working-class families, while Ofsted chief inspector Amanda Spielman has warned schools not to pass children through closing again to "take leave".

Parents checked up on social media this morning, describing their fear of caring for their children at home for the eleventh hour while trying to keep a full-time job, with many calling the schools unilaterally deciding to close "Staggering" criticized.

Northfield St. Nicholas Primary Academy in Lowestoft, Suffolk announced that it is closing on Facebook, with parents Rebecca Kane venting, “Nice to have a friend find out about this at 8:30 pm. No email or text to let us know. I can't say I'm surprised. & # 39;

Other parents around the country said they were afraid for their children because for many homeschooling in their first lockdown last year meant "make your schedules here" and "no actual classes".

All schools in London are closed today, along with most Covid-19 hotspots in Essex, Kent, East Sussex, Buckinghamshire and Hertfordshire, after a dictation from the Department of Education last week. But principals who are supposed to stay open in areas like Surrey, Gloucestershire, Newcastle, Norfolk, Liverpool, County Durham, West Sussex, Sheffield, Wolverhampton, Leeds and Lancashire have closed anyway.

In the largest vaccination drive in British history, half a million doses of the Oxford University / AstraZeneca Jab will be made available to people in need this week. "Tens of millions" are promised by April.

AstraZeneca bosses had previously suggested finishing up to 2 million cans a week by mid-January, and officials have promised to deliver the puffs as soon as possible.

That ambitious target may be further away than hoped, however, with fears the UK won't get enough supplies until February. Matt Hancock announced today that increasing the country's manufacturing capacity is "a major medium-term project".

And he said the "bureaucracy" associated with signing up as a voluntary vaccine will be cut after it was revealed last week that thousands of retired medics trying to hand out the jostles were tied to red tape.

Mr. Hancock insisted that the manufacturing process will be the determining factor in how quickly vaccines can be deployed, not the NHS operation.

He told BBC Breakfast: “If the NHS has to go faster, it will go faster. If two million doses were dispensed a week, the NHS would be dispensing at that rate.

"That is the crucial question, but this offer does not yet exist and we are working very closely with the manufacturers."

Last night, Sir Keir Starmer called for an immediate nationwide lockdown when he warned the virus was clearly out of control. The Labor leader added: "Don't let the Prime Minister say," I will, but not yet. "

“That's the problem he's had so many times. Nationwide lockdown – The prime minister has hinted this will happen but he is again delaying. and we cannot afford that again. & # 39;

While appearing on the Andrew Marr Show on BBC One yesterday, Mr Johnson said he was "completely reconciled to doing what it takes to fight the virus" and warned of a "difficult time".

He said vaccinating more people would provide a way out of restrictions and he hoped that "tens of millions" would be vaccinated over the next three months.

The Prime Minister maintained his prediction that the situation would improve by spring, but added: “We may have to do things over the next few weeks that will be more difficult in many parts of the country.

"I totally agree – and I bet the people of this country are okay with it, because until the vaccine gets really massive, we will fight this virus with the same tools."

Mr Johnson said the government is looking into whether Tier 4 restrictions are tight enough to control the spread of the virus or if more steps are needed, adding, "We need to keep checking things out."

When asked whether people could be restricted to an hour of exercise a day or a total ban on household mixing could be introduced, he replied, “There are obviously a number of tougher measures we would need to consider. I'm not going to speculate now about what they would be.

This map shows how the coronavirus variants have been tracked on their worldwide distribution

This map shows how the coronavirus variants have been tracked on their worldwide distribution

Social distancing signs displayed at Coldfall Primary School in Muswell Hill, London, on Jan. 2 as Covid cases across the capital put increasing pressure on the NHS

Social distancing signs displayed at Coldfall Primary School in Muswell Hill, London, on Jan. 2 as Covid cases across the capital put increasing pressure on the NHS

“School closings – which we had to do in March – are clearly one of those things. We don't necessarily want to do that. & # 39;

Government sources have confirmed that ministers wanted to add even more areas of England to Stage Four – although curfews are not currently seen as imminent.

But Tory's former minister, Sir Desmond Swayne, was one of those who condemned the idea of ​​tightening the curbs. “What pain do you want to cause us? What are they going to stop us now? & # 39; he told the telegraph.

»Close important shops and takeaways? The whole thing is insane – it goes beyond the ridiculous. & # 39;

Professor Sir Mark Walport, a member of the government's scientific advisory group on emergencies (Sage), said it was difficult to keep the new, faster-spreading strain of virus under control without "much stricter" social distancing measures.

On the Andrew Marr Show, the former scientific advisor said, “It is clear that this variant transmits more easily – it transmits more easily in younger age groups too.

'It's important to note that it doesn't appear to be causing any worse disease or that it is more resilient to the effects of the vaccine, but it will be very, very difficult to keep under control without much closer social relationships. Distancing measures. & # 39;

Sir Keir insisted that there could be no "more tremors, no more delay," adding, "The longer you delay making tough decisions, the worse it is in health, the worse it is in economic."

In response to his comments, a # 10 source said: “The Prime Minister has consistently understood that we are driven by the need to protect the NHS and save lives as opposed to Labor, who have been partisan for ten months.

& # 39; We moved more areas in Tier 4 to take advantage of the new variant and escalated other areas in Tier Three. This targeted approach is the right one. & # 39;

Increase in station cases "could fill 12 hospitals"

By Glen Keogh and Colin Fernandez for the Daily Mail

PM swears tens of millions of bumps and bureaucracy by March

Boris Johnson has vowed that "tens of millions" of coronavirus vaccine doses will be given by March – as he admitted ministers need to cut the "absurd" red tape to prevent retired medical professionals from joining the effort.

The prime minister refused to give precise figures on how many people will be vaccinated, apart from the government's plan to use two million shocks a week.

But he said, "What I can tell you is that … we hope we can make tens of millions in the next three months."

The Oxford University and AstraZeneca vaccine is due to be administered from tomorrow. The British process is one of the fastest in the world so far.

Experts have warned the UK's exit from the crippling lockdown depends on vaccinating at least 25 million vulnerable people by spring.

The gap between the first and second vaccine dose is widened to reach more people.

Meanwhile, there have been concerns that tens of thousands of recently retired general practitioners, surgeons and nurses are no longer able to help because of the bureaucracy involved.

Criticism of “ridiculous” demands has increased, for example the requirement to be certified in fire protection or to be trained in preventing radicalization.

When asked about the complaints, Mr Johnson said, "I find it absurd and I know the Minister of Health is taking steps to get rid of this pointless red tape."

The number of beds occupied by Covid patients rose in the eight days from Christmas by the equivalent of "12 full hospitals," according to NHS figures.

Between December 25 and January 2, the total number of inpatients with coronavirus in England rose from 17,701 to 23,557 – an increase of 33 percent.

Chris Hopson, executive director of NHS Providers, described the increase as the equivalent of "12 additional full hospitals full of Covid patients". East of England, London and the South East saw the largest percentage increases in hospital admissions for those with the virus as the new, more infectious strain continues to make its way.

Mr Hopson said, "You can imagine why people in the NHS are concerned about how quickly this virus is spreading."

Meanwhile, contingency plans are being put in place to move critically ill patients hundreds of kilometers as part of a “pairing” program to relieve pressure on areas where the NHS is struggling to cope.

Those in the east of England could be taken to hospitals in the Midlands while the health foundations in the southeast prepare to send patients to the southwest.

It is believed to be the first of its kind in the history of the NHS. Mr Hopson said only a small number of patients would be moved from London when space in neighboring hospitals ran out.

"When things get tougher we will find other ways to treat people in the area, but we know there are some patients who can be taken where the pressures are a little less, for example to the southwest and in the Midlands, "he said on Sunday Times.

On New Year's Eve, three intensive care units in London were reportedly full and seriously ill patients were waiting to be transferred to other facilities. North Middlesex University Hospital, Barnet Hospital and Whittington Hospital in the north and northwest of the capital described various issues in an email to Sky News, including patients receiving oxygen in A&E.

Dr. Alison Pittard, the dean of the intensive care faculty, said the NHS is trying to continue its other services and treat patients while it deals with the second wave of coronavirus.

She told the BBC's Andrew Marr Show, "One of the things I want to share with the public is that if you have any concerns about whether it is Covid or not, you need to seek advice and help." She said there were "logistical issues" with the Nightingale temporary hospitals, some of which were used to support diagnostic services.

Yesterday, NHS chiefs denied reports that cancer surgeries had to be delayed to ensure there were enough beds in London.

"Don't let that be you" Covid patient, 49, recounts how she saw her mother, 76, die in hospital while they both battled viruses in intensive care after the disease "devastated" her family

  • Anabel Sharma, 49, was taken to hospital with Covid along with mother Maria, 76
  • Pair snapped a photo together in hospital beds while they were receiving breathing assistance
  • Maria died 24 hours after being admitted to the Leicester Royal Infirmary
  • Anabel, a mother of three, has now warned others of the dangers of Covid-19

By James Robinson for MailOnline

Eine Frau, die Seite an Seite mit ihrer Mutter auf der Intensivstation lag, als sie an Covid starb, hat andere gewarnt: "Lass das nicht du sein."

Anabel Sharma (49) und ihre Mutter Maria Rico (76) lagen nebeneinander im Krankenhaus, als sie beide gegen Covid-19 kämpften, nachdem das Virus ihre Familie „verwüstet“ hatte.

Das Paar wurde ein letztes Mal abgebildet, als sie Hände hielten, während beide Unterstützung für ihre Atmung erhielten. Weniger als 24 Stunden später war Maria gestorben.

In einer scharfen Warnung vor den Gefahren des Virus hat die dreifache Mutter Anabel aus Leicestershire andere aufgefordert, Familienmitglieder zu verlieren, wenn sie sich nicht an die Regeln halten.

Im Gespräch mit dem Spiegel: „Ich hätte nie gedacht, dass Covid uns schlagen würde – aber es tat es. Die Geschwindigkeit, die Covid durch unsere Familie zerstörte, war erschreckend.

Die 49-jährige Anabel und ihre Familie erkrankten Ende letzten Jahres alle an Covid

"Wenn jemand darüber nachdenkt, die Regeln zu brechen, würde ich ihn dringend bitten, sich in meine Lage zu versetzen und darüber nachzudenken, wie es sein könnte, Ihre Mutter sterben zu sehen oder zu erfahren, dass Sie möglicherweise nicht leben."

Die 49-jährige Anabel und ihre Familie erkrankten Ende letzten Jahres alle an Covid.

Ihr 12-jähriger Sohn, Isaac, hatte nach der Rückkehr zur Schule im September laut Mirror erstmals Covid unter Vertrag genommen.

Anabel, ihr Ehemann Bharat (47) und ihre anderen Söhne Jacob (22) und Noah (10) erkrankten später an dem Virus.

Ihre Mutter Maria war die letzte, die positiv auf Covid getestet wurde.

Die Mutter Anabel und Maria wurden Mitte Oktober in die königliche Krankenstation von Leicester gebracht und voneinander entfernt auf Sauerstoffbetten gelegt.

Nachdem Maria einen DNAR-Befehl (Do Not Attempt Resuscitation) unterschrieben hatte, wurde Maria in einem Bett neben Anabel gerollt.

Maria starb am 1. und 24. November, nachdem das Paar zusammen ein Foto gemacht hatte, das sie auf einem Atemgerät und Anabel in einer Sauerstoffmaske zeigte.

Anabel sagte, sie habe die Sauerstoffmaske abgenommen, um sich von ihrer Mutter zu verabschieden.

In einem emotionalen Beitrag auf der Facebook-Seite "Humans of Covid-19" sagte Anabel, die Tortur sei die "dunkelste Zeit meines Lebens" gewesen.

Sie sagte: „Als meine Mutter und ich zu A & E gebracht wurden, brauchten wir beide ITU, aber sie waren voll.

"Wir haben nur unsere Betten bekommen, weil an diesem Tag vier Patienten gestorben sind und Platz frei gemacht haben."

Sie beschrieb die Art der Behandlung, die sie für Covid – Kontinuierlicher positiver Atemwegsdruck (CPAP) – erhielt, als „schrecklich und unerbittlich“.

„Ich musste vier Wochen lang rund um die Uhr eine Plastikhaube tragen, die Sauerstoff in meine Lunge drückte.

"Es fühlte sich an, als würde man den Kopf aus einem Auto stecken, das mit 30 Meilen pro Stunde fährt. Es war laut, ich konnte nicht sehen, hören und sie fütterten mich durch eine Öffnung an der Seite der Motorhaube", fügte sie hinzu.

Anabel gab auch bekannt, dass sie aufgrund von Covid nicht an der Beerdigung ihrer Mutter teilnehmen konnte, und fügte hinzu: „Ich habe es per Live-Stream gesehen. Ich war allein, genauso wie meine Familie, wir konnten uns nicht trösten, es hat mein ohnehin schon zerbrechliches Herz gebrochen. & # 39;

In einer Warnung an andere über Covid sagte sie: „Was Sie über den NHS-Bettdruck lesen, ist wahr, es ist nicht wie die Grippe und die Menschen sterben oder wenn sie ein Überlebender wie ich sind, werden sie vielleicht nie wieder die gleichen sein. & # 39;

Zelte auf Spielplätzen, während der Betrieb beginnt, 3,4 Millionen Schüler zu testen

Von Max Aitchison und Julie Henry

Die letzten Vorbereitungen laufen, um ab dem 11. Januar mit den Massentests der 3,4 Millionen Schüler der Sekundarstufe in England zu beginnen.

Schulhallen werden hastig umgebaut und in einigen Fällen werden auf Spielplätzen Zelte errichtet.

Es ist zu hoffen, dass im Rahmen des Programms alle 11- bis 18-Jährigen an 3.456 staatlichen Schulen sowie an Colleges und Privatschulen regelmäßig getestet werden. Ziel ist es, asymptomatische Coronavirus-Fälle zu erkennen und zu verhindern, dass eine große Anzahl von Schülern zur Selbstisolierung nach Hause geschickt wird.

Die letzten Vorbereitungen laufen, um ab dem 11. Januar mit den Massentests der 3,4 Millionen Schüler der Sekundarstufe in England zu beginnen (Bild auf Lager).

Die letzten Vorbereitungen laufen, um ab dem 11. Januar mit den Massentests der 3,4 Millionen Schüler der Sekundarstufe in England zu beginnen (Bild auf Lager).

Ab morgen erhalten die Schulen Lieferungen von bis zu 1.000 Testkits und PSA für Geräte mit seitlichem Durchfluss. The kits, which require either a nasal or throat swab, can produce results in under 30 minutes.

The Harris Federation, which has 28 secondary schools, will use gyms and marquees to administer the tests. CEO Sir Daniel Moynihan said: 'There is an enormous gap between those who come from low income backgrounds and those that don't.

'The pandemic has made that worse. If we want a fairer society and levelling up, we need kids in school.' Most secondary students will return on January 18, but 760,000 in exam years 11 and 13 go back on January 11. They will receive one test before their first lesson and a follow-up three days later. Staff will be tested once a week.

Anyone who tests positive will then take a more accurate PCR test before leaving the premises to self-isolate. They will not be allowed to get public transport home and their close contacts will be offered daily tests for seven days so they can stay in school or college rather than have to isolate at home. Ministers are also considering whether to extend the guidance on wearing masks in communal areas to inside secondary school classrooms.

Just under 1.5 per cent of pupils and teachers in English secondary schools tested positive for coronavirus in the week ending November 19, according to the Office for National Statistics, but since then the new Covid-19 variant has spread rapidly.

The testing scheme was initially optional, but made mandatory by the Government last Thursday. Children under 16 will need the signed consent of their parents for tests. Older students must agree to it themselves.

A trial scheme at Painsley Catholic College in Cheadle, Staffordshire, had a take-up rate of 80 per cent. CEO Steve Bell said: 'It's a lot to get your head around and the mass of documentation and demands can put anxiety levels through the roof, but that soon disappears when everyone realises it is very straightforward.'

Three schools in the nationwide Star Academies Trust also participated in a pilot scheme, recruiting exam invigilators and cleaners who had already been vetted.

Its CEO, Hamid Patel, said: 'School leaders and teachers are understandably fatigued after many months of managing the crisis. The tight timetable has added to the challenges but it is manageable with creative thinking, planning and determination.'

Each school will have to deploy a team covering seven different roles: team leader, test assistants, processors, a Covid-19 coordinator, registration assistants, result recorders and cleaners. None of the roles require any clinical experience as most students will do the swabs themselves. But experts have criticised the reliability of self-administered tests, claiming they miss as many as half of cases. To counter that, some schools are enlisting the help of medical professionals.

Chris Ramsey, headmaster of Whitgift School in Croydon, South London, said: 'It's not fair to expect volunteers, teachers or the boys to take responsibility.'

The Government has set aside £78 million for the scheme, but there are warnings that will run out within weeks. Private schools must fund the project themselves.

Roughly 45,000 people will be needed to help with the tests and some schools will need paid staff to help. Some are advertising for 'Covid testing assistants' paid between £10 and £17-an-hour. Chris Parkinson, principal of Bosworth Academy in Leicester, said: 'The biggest challenge is getting the workforce in place.'

The only guidance offered by the Government is a 30-page handbook alongside online sessions. Some 1,500 military personnel will offer support but only online or by phone.

Criticising the scheme, Geoff Barton, General Secretary of the Association of School and College Leaders, said: 'Ministers need to remember that schools and colleges are educational institutions, not medical facilities, and it has to support this testing programme properly.'

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