ENTERTAINMENT

Covid Lockdown: Michael Gove and Teaching Union Conflicts in Schools


More than 100,000 people are signing a union petition for closed schools – but Michael Gove says the government is ready to extend the lockdown to keep it open

  • The National Education Union is gaining support in views on school closings
  • The petition to lock schools has garnered more than 100,000 signatures
  • The parents group Us For Them does not want to refuse education for children

A fight to keep classrooms open during the lockdown was brewing last night after the largest teachers' union launched a campaign to shut them down.

Michael Gove said it was so important to keep schools open that Whitehall was ready to extend the national lockdown on the cause.

However, the National Education Union, which represents more than 450,000 teachers, is gaining increasing support.

Michael Gove (pictured) said it was so important to keep schools open that Whitehall was ready to extend the national lockdown on the cause

Michael Gove said it was so important to keep schools open that Whitehall was ready to extend the national lockdown on the cause. Pictured: students from Manchester Metropolitan University

Michael Gove said it was so important to keep schools open that Whitehall was ready to extend the national lockdown on the cause. Pictured: students from Manchester Metropolitan University

However, the National Education Union, which represents more than 450,000 teachers, is gaining increasing support. Pictured: student accommodation at the University of Sheffield

However, the National Education Union, which represents more than 450,000 teachers, is gaining increasing support. Pictured: student accommodation at the University of Sheffield

Universities are advised to abandon face-to-face classes and students have been told: Don't go home early

Universities prepare for riot after government advised them to stop face-to-face classes – but banned students from returning home early.

Vice Chancellors have warned that caring for locked out students during outbreaks is like monitoring prisons. But Boris Johnson said on Saturday that all universities will remain open.

The Cabinet Office guidelines released after its announcement said they should "consider upgrading to higher levels of online learning if possible."

It also states: “If you live at university, you are not allowed to switch back and forth between your permanent home and your dormitory during the semester. You shouldn't return home for Christmas until the end of the school year. & # 39;

The Ministry of Education has not yet released any plans for students to go home on vacation without potentially spreading the virus.

The new lockdown has cast new doubts about her alleged preference for the end of the semester that in-person classes would end on December 8, followed by students who were in isolation for two weeks.

Dr. Jo Grady, chairman of the UCU faculty union, said the lockdown was "a complete half-measure" and the health of students and staff was "at risk".

She said there needs to be a "safe and managed, flexible route home for students who want to leave when it is safe" for fear they might fall back before Thursday's travel ban.

The vast majority of universities have confirmed coronavirus cases, and significant outbreaks have been occurring in all locations for months.

Students protested that they were "locked up" in halls. Around 1,500 Manchester Metropolitan students were banned in September after 500 tested positive.

A Vice Chancellor said: "We all watched with something horrified how Manchester Metropolitan was essentially overseeing a prison for these students."

Hillary Gyebi-Ababio of the National Union of Students said, "The students deserve more than half-hearted plans and continued insecurity."

The Ministry of Education was asked for a comment.

The union's campaign has already been supported by high-ranking Labor figures while its petition to lock the schools garnered more than 100,000 signatures within hours of the prime minister's speech on Saturday evening.

Cabinet Minister Gove told the BBC's Andrew Marr Show, "I believe we want to keep schools open and I believe the actions we are taking will enable us to do so."

Molly Kingsley, co-founder of Us For Them parents group, said, “It's critical that schools stay open as normally as possible.

"If health issues were really the issue, why didn't the unions demand closings weeks ago? … It's really hard to believe that a teacher would want to refuse children education at this crucial moment."

Next summer's GCSEs and A-Levels have also been cast into new doubts. Heads said a planned three-week delay was now a "totally inadequate solution".

The government insists that schools and universities be exempt from closure so that learners can "continue on their way to exams and the next level of education or employment".

However, the Department of Education has not yet released contingency plans for exams after this year's grading chaos or issued new guidelines to schools for the recent lockdown.

There are also no details of additional employee or student testing offerings beyond Boris Johnson's Saturday promise of "quick turnaround tests" that will be rolled out in "a few days."

NEW chairman Kevin Courtney said the lockdown by not including schools was "another half-measure" and "likely would not have the effect the Prime Minister wanted".

His union also wants Rotas to be rolled out after the lockdown, with older students taking turns studying from home.

Union leader Sir Keir Starmer told Andrew Marr yesterday that the lockdown should coincide with halftime.

He agreed that schools must remain open, but was publicly opposed, among others, by Greater Manchester Mayor Andy Burnham.

Mr Burnham said he supported a school closure to "create the conditions for the biggest drop in cases we could achieve".

Scientists have warned the lockdown may have to be extended if schools stay open.

Former chief scientific adviser Sir Mark Walport told Sky's Sophy Ridge on Sunday that it was "unlikely the virus will drop as quickly this time as it did during the initial lockdown because we opened schools".

Other major education unions, though not in favor of the permanent closure, also expressed serious concerns about the government's plans.

An Education Department spokesman said, "We prioritize the education and wellbeing of children and adolescents … Evidence has highlighted the risks of being out of school for their development and mental health."

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