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Covid-19 outbreaks are increasing fastest in Hull, Bath and Derby


Covid-19 outbreaks are increasing fastest in Hull, Derby and Bath. According to official data, only 20 of the 150 authorities in England have seen a decrease in infections over the past week.

Hull and Derby saw their coronavirus epidemics almost double in the seven-day period ending October 25. The 7-day infection rate rose to 279 and 329 cases per 100,000 people, respectively.

Both cities, along with the rest of Staffordshire and Derbyshire, will move from Tier 1 to Tier 2 from Saturday to curb the surge in infections. This was announced yesterday as England moved one step closer to full national lockdown.

However, most of the authorities where epidemics have increased the most are still in the first stage, where only the 6pm and 10pm curfew only applies. Scientists have argued that these rules are not strict enough to reduce the outbreak. Top government advisors warn that current growth is "very bleak".

For example, North Somerset and Bath, as well as North East Somerset, where cases rose 83 percent and 70 percent in a week, respectively, need to face even tighter anti-virus restrictions. Despite the warnings, the coronavirus crisis is "accelerating" in the south of the country.

Figures from Public Health England's weekly surveillance report show that the infection rate in Nottingham has fallen by 30 percent. Despite the city's shrinking outbreak, it will be placed under the toughest Tier 3 restrictions starting tomorrow along with the rest of the county.

And the data provided more evidence that the toughest lockdown measures work. Liverpool, Knowsley, Sefton and St. Helens are all seeing drops in their weekly coronavirus infection rates. The entire Merseyside area has been closed since October 14th.

It suggests that the brutal restrictions prohibiting people from being in contact with anyone outside of their own household, and imposing the closure of many pubs, bars, and in some cases gyms, are starting to work. However, scientists say that the real effects of the measure only become clear after a few weeks.

Boris Johnson is again being pressured by his doctors to impose a nationwide shutdown before and after Christmas so families can gather together over the holidays. Dominic Raab hinted today that No10 could introduce a new set of even stricter Tier 4 restrictions and declined to rule out a national lockdown.

Percentage change in coronavirus cases in London in the week ended October 25: The five local authorities that have seen the highest increase in infection rates are: Kingston upon Hull City, 92.81 percent; Derby, 91.84 percent; North Somerset, 82.99 percent; Medway, 77.17 percent; and Bath and North East Somerset 69.72 percent

It was announced yesterday that another 16 authorities will be drawn into the second stage from Saturday. Some of them were among the 20 places where the outbreaks have worsened significantly, according to Public Health England (PHE) data.

PHE data is based on the number of positive smears in the week of October 19-25. The new infections can be divided by the population size for each area to get a fall rate per 100,000 people. This allows numbers to be compared accurately between different areas.

For example, in Kingston upon Hull, 279 new cases per 100,000 people were diagnosed over that seven day period. The week before it was 145, which corresponds to an increase of 93 percent.

Similarly, the infection rate in Derby City rose 92 percent from 171 to 328 cases per 100,000. This suggests that the outbreak is doubling every seven days in these locations.

However, more tests may have been requested in both areas to help contain the virus. So if you just look at growth, you may not get the full picture. Health Department statistics according to which puncture tests carried out by local authorities are only valid until October 21, which means it is impossible to say exactly how much the numbers were skewed by smears over those fortnight.

Earlier this week, Derby's health director Dr. Robyn Dewis is urging all of the city's 259,000 residents to adhere to Tier 2 restrictions.

The council was waiting to be promoted to the higher level, which the ministers confirmed last night. Amber Valley, Bolsover, Derbyshire Dales, Derby City, South Derbyshire and the entire High Peak will move to the second stage starting Saturday.

Dr. Dewis told MailOnline: “I never look forward to asking our residents to put restrictions on their daily lives, but I feel it is imperative that we take action to reduce the spread of the virus.

“We have seen rapid growth across the city, with all stations affected. What is important is that we are now seeing a significant increase in those over 60 who are infected. & # 39;

Outbreaks also increased sharply in North Somerset (83 percent more) and Bath and North East Somerset (70 percent more).

However, their infection rates of 130.2 and 191 are currently well below the UK average (230 per 100,000). This could explain why they are staying on medium Tier 1 alert.

Matt Lenny, director of public health at North Somerset Council, said in a statement: “Analysis of the latest case data also shows that there is no clear pattern of infection in local communities.

& # 39; The case data shows us that the virus is widespread in our community and we are only seeing higher rates of infection in younger people.

“I urge every North Somerset resident to make the right decisions as they go about their daily lives.

“We're at a critical point as cases are increasing and people are mingling and spending more time indoors. We should all pretend we already have the virus and change our behavior to reduce the spread. & # 39;

While locations in Somerset, England are not considered Covid-10 hotspots, they can if action is not taken sooner rather than later to slow the spread of growth.

Where has the infection rate increased the most?

Kingston upon Hull, town with 92.81%

Derby 91.84%

North Somerset 82.99%

Medway 77.17%

Bath and North East Somerset 69.72%

South Gloucestershire 62.13%

Herefordshire, county of 58.10%

Derbyshire 57.98%

Stoke-on-Trent 56.79%

Lincolnshire 55.26%

Staffordshire 55.21%

Leicestershire 54.29%

Southampton 54.02%

Brighton and Hove 52.57%

Milton Keynes 50.88%

Swindon 49.99%

East Riding of Yorkshire 49.32%

Dudley 49.07%

West Sussex 46.89%

Leicester 46.57%

Where has the infection rate increased the least?

Nottingham -30.00%

Liverpool -20.98%

York -20.25%

Windsor and Maidenhead -20.09%

Knowsley -18.18%

County Durham -15.51%

Sefton -12.54%

Rutland -11.63%

Devonian -11.12%

Camden -10.03%

Halton -7.95%

South Tyneside -5.35%

Hackney and City of London -4.60%

Richmond upon Thames -3.96%

St. Helens -3.80%

Hartlepool -3.68%

Slough -3.02%

Sheffield -2.46%

Leeds -1.22%

Newcastle upon Tyne -0.42%

Experts have previously said that the rate at which an outbreak is growing – rather than its current size – is the most important factor when considering the severity of the situation in a given area.

Ministers are expected to analyze a "basket" of indicators to help make decisions about Covid-19 restrictions, including the rate of infection, hospital admissions and the rate of growth.

Dominic Raab says government is "ready" for TIER FOUR COVID restrictions

Dominic Raab has hinted today that the government could introduce a new set of even tougher level 4 coronavirus restrictions as he refused to rule out a national lockdown.

The current local government lockdown system is based on three levels, but there are concerns that even the most draconian rules at level three will not be enough to stop the spread of the disease.

In a new tier 4 store, non-essential stores could be closed and only taken to work and school.

Mr Raab said the government was "always ready for further action" as he insisted that ministers intend to stick with their localized approach to fighting infection.

However, the foreign minister admitted that both Germany and France had employed a strategy of local raids before eventually being forced to new nation shutdowns.

He would only go so far as to say that the government is "trying to avoid" following Britain's European neighbors because he has refused to impose a "blanket or blunt approach".

Mr Raab told the BBC's Radio 4 Today: “We are always ready for any further action we can take, but I think the most important thing about further action is that we continue on the path we have taken to fight the virus.

“The difference between now and the first lockdown is that we're in a much better place to really focus on where the virus is greatest, and I think that's right, not just in terms of science and virus management, but also in terms of the way people think it is fair to fight the virus. It is natural justice that we focus on the areas where the increase is greatest, and we do not have a one-size-fits-all, blanket or blunt approach. & # 39;

Mr Raab said the government wanted to avoid the "arbitrariness of a blanket approach" as he claimed the public was in favor of targeted restrictions.

However, he didn't rule out the possibility of a national lockdown at some point after France and Germany took the move earlier this week.

He said, “You mention France. France naturally tried a localized approach and then went back to the national approach.

“I think that shows you that Germany is the same. It is important that we all come together at the local to the national level, communities, local leaders and national leaders, and really lean on the locally focused approach.

"It is the most effective way to fight the virus and avoid the blanket approach that I believe is not in the best interests of this country and that we are trying to avoid."

Mr Raab said it was "vital" to "get the public involved" and he believed the government's tiered approach was the best way to do it.

In South Gloucestershire in the southwest and Herefordshire in the West Midlands, outbreaks also increased rapidly by around 60 percent in a week. However, their infection rates are also below the national average and are currently 192 and 86, respectively.

The figures show that the "second wave" is now affecting every corner of England, not just the north.

Scientists warned this week that infections are "getting faster" in the south.

A worrying government-funded study by Imperial College London found the outbreak appears to be fastest in London and the south-west, where the rules are comparatively lax, and slowest in the northern regions with the most stringent restrictions.

They predicted that the R-rate – the average number of people infected by each carrier – is also higher than two in the Southeast, East, and Southwest, which have mostly escaped tough local lockdowns.

But the R-rate in the capital is three higher than anywhere else in England. For comparison, the experts stated that the national R-rate is 1.6. Cases double every three days compared to every nine days in the rest of England, the study said.

The PHE data shows that only 20 out of 149 councils saw their Covid-19 infection rates decline in the week leading up to October 25. For comparison: 23 recorded a decline the week before.

In some major cities, infection rates fell in the week leading up to October 25th. These include Nottingham (minus 30 percent), Liverpool (minus 21 percent), Sheffield (minus 2.46 percent) and Leeds (minus 1.22 percent). .

Even so, Nottingham and Leeds will come under tier three restrictions this weekend. And there is no clear path for Liverpool and Sheffield to get out of their local "locks".

Liverpool and the rest of Merseyside, including Halton, Knowsley, Sefton, St. Helens and Wirral, jumped straight into the third tier when the tiered system went into effect on October 14th. In all of these places, infection rates have dropped in the past week, with the exception of Wirral, where cases only rose 6 percent.

A number of locations under Tier Two have also seen decreases in infection rates, including York (20 percent), South Tyneside (5 percent), and Newcastle upon Tyne (a slight minus 0.42 percent).

Parts of London – Camden (down 10 percent), Hackney and City of London (down 4.60 percent), and Richmond upon Thames (down 3.96 percent) – also saw improvements in infection rates. These areas have some of the highest infection rates in London, suggesting residents may have controlled the coronavirus.

However, it is believed that London could enter Tier 3 lockdown within two weeks, provided that infection rates across the capital do not drop significantly.

Londoners are currently banned from meeting anyone indoors with whom they do not live together.

However, London Mayor Sadiq Khan is putting pressure on number 10 to move the city to Stage Three, although infection rates vary across 32 different boroughs – from 223 positive tests per 100,000 residents in Ealing in the last week to 103 per 100,000 in Lewisham.

It comes after the Government's Scientific Advisory Group on Emergencies (Sage) reportedly said this week that all of England could be locked in Stage Three by mid-December if a national lockdown is not passed beforehand.

They said virus rates across the country will go beyond levels seen in areas that were rated "very high" as early as the Christmas season, The Sun reported, with "a government source" saying "The latest Sage numbers are utterly bleak. & # 39;

SAGE has again pressured Boris Johnson to impose stricter restrictions, as it warned that up to 85,000 people could die in a second wave. A "reasonable worst-case scenario" proposed by SAGE suggested that daily deaths could stay above 500 for three months or more through next March.

Almost 60 percent of the population - around 32.6 million - will be subject to stricter rules by Monday

Almost 60 percent of the population – around 32.6 million – will be subject to stricter rules by Monday

London "will go into Tier 3 suspension" in two weeks as the UK faces a Super Spreader Christmas party

London could be thrown into Tier 3 lockdown within two weeks as England edged closer to full national lockdown through the back door last night and millions said they would face additional curbs.

Boris Johnson is again under pressure from his doctors to impose a nationwide shutdown before and after Christmas to allow families to congregate over the holidays, and to close sources so Sadiq Khan expects the capital to close immediately.

Senior figures warn that Britain's three tier system is not enough to beat the numbers. Deputy chief medical officer Jonathan Van-Tam is reportedly starting to change his mind on whether regional lockdowns will suppress the virus. He supported the move at a press conference no.10 last week

He presented data to a meeting of Covid-O, the cabinet's subcommittee on coronavirus, which a source described as "very, very bleak" and said daily hospital admissions had hit 1,404, their highest level since April.

There are fears the whole country will be at Level 3 by Christmas and not be able to meet extended family members unless the government takes tough, draconian measures ahead of the season.

Allowing people to visit family for Christmas will be a "spreader event" that can cause a surge in infections many times worse than that caused by the return of university students, experts believe.

However, putting national restrictions in place before and after Christmas and lifting those restrictions for the big day could help to minimize the impact.

A senior health official told the Telegraph that anti-Covid measures are most likely to be successful if taken on a national basis, rather than tightening the rules on Tier 3.

They added that locking out the breakers after Christmas could also help reverse the number and curb the rising number of hospitalizations as fears spread that UK intensive care units could overflow.

"Releasing measures for two days is unlikely to result in a big rebound," a source said. But it won't do anything. Christmas brings people from all over the country to sit together so it is very likely a spreading event.

"But people want to see loved ones and they want to make physical contact, and we have to recognize that."

Independent experts told MailOnline that it is likely that most places in England that are in Tier 1 will switch to Tier 2 by Christmas, as curfew after 6pm and 10pm is insufficient to eradicate increasing infections.

Martin McKee, Professor of European Public Health at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine and a member of Independent Sage, said: “Unfortunately we have allowed the infection to get out of hand and as a result we have to change this around or it will just keep going rise, more will become seriously ill and more people will die.

“The sooner we impose stricter restrictions, the better. I see MPs say, "The rates in my region are low so we shouldn't do anything". It's not about whether the fall is low, it's about whether they are increasing rapidly.

"We saw very clearly in March that it is better sooner than later. We should really do that now, we really have no time to lose."

However, Professor McKee stressed that with stricter restrictions, three essential things are required – curbing indoor social mixing, where the virus can easily spread, mental health support, and a functioning testing and tracking system. At the moment, the British NHS Test and Trace does not achieve the promised status of "world hit".

Professor McKee added, “As long as infections are increasing, we have a big problem. Simply because of the nature of exponential growth. It's a simple nature of math. Even if the infections increase only slightly, the rate of growth increases faster.

“On the other hand, if we can take really tough measures to keep people from mingling with one another, there can be a sharp decline in a relatively short period of time.

Professor Paul Hunter, an infectious disease expert at the University of East Anglia, said: “The Tier One restrictions are clearly not working to suppress the epidemic. I suspect the government would decide to increase in most regions of the country and move into stage two at least next month. And some of the current tier two will switch to tier three.

"The interesting thing is that the northern cities are not going as fast as they used to be. And in some of these cities like Liverpool, it seems to be a bit falling already.

"I think it's a little early to say if these Level 2 / Tier 3 levels aren't working." The bottom line is that higher restrictions may work, but it's too early to be sure.

"The rural areas of the southern small town are currently seeing many of the current increases. It is very evident that cases are increasing in the south now. Almost everywhere in between is on the rise.

"The question is, when do they decide that this is no longer acceptable or tolerable and then increase the restrictions in those areas."

Simon Clarke, Associate Professor of Cell Microbiology at the University of Reading, said, “Are local restrictions sufficient? They should be, but the problem is not tier two to three as much as one to two. We know in certain parts of the country that this is not happening quickly enough.

“My gut feeling is that we are heading for tightening restrictions by the New Year. I think it will be something like tier three or maybe closer. I think we're going to add a level 4. But it's just a guess. "

The UK is slowly moving closer to a de facto lockdown each day, with the UK confirming an additional 23,065 positive test results and 280 deaths yesterday.

The number of cases is up 8.6 percent from the 21,242 announced last Thursday, while the number of deaths has increased by 48 percent.

Boris Johnson is again under pressure from his doctors to impose a nationwide shutdown before and after Christmas so families can gather over the holidays

Boris Johnson is again under pressure from his doctors to impose a nationwide shutdown before and after Christmas so families can gather over the holidays

Boris Johnson is again under pressure from his doctors to impose a nationwide shutdown before and after Christmas to allow families to congregate over the holidays, and to close the sources so Sadiq Khan expects the capital to close immediately.

Senior figures warn that Britain's three tier system is not enough to beat the numbers. Deputy chief medical officer Jonathan Van-Tam is reportedly starting to change his mind on whether regional lockdowns will suppress the virus. He supported the move at a press conference no.10 last week

He presented data to a meeting of Covid-O, the cabinet's subcommittee on coronavirus, which a source described as "very, very bleak" and said daily hospital admissions had hit 1,404, their highest level since April.

Allowing people to visit family for Christmas will be a spreader event that can cause a surge in infections many times worse than that caused by the return of university students, experts believe.

However, putting national restrictions in place before and after Christmas and lifting those restrictions for the big day could help minimize the impact.

Nearly 60 percent of the population – around 32.6 million – will be subject to stricter rules by Monday, and it is believed that London could move to the top tier in two weeks, provided that infection rates don't drop significantly.

16 areas, including Oxford, Luton, East Riding of Yorkshire, Kingston Upon Hull, Derbyshire Dales, Derby and Staffordshire, are classified as High Risk Level 2 at midnight.

This means that more than 21.6 million people are facing restrictions that include banning indoor contact with someone from another household, whether at home or in bars, restaurants and cafes.

Another 11 million will be at very high risk in Level 3 from midnight on Sunday, when Leeds and the rest of West Yorkshire are added to the places where pubs are closed unless food is served.

This leaves only 23.7 million without extended restrictions.

Due to the tighter restrictions in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland, just over three-fifths of the UK population live under additional lockdown restrictions.

HOW HAVE THE INFECTION RATES CHANGED IN YOUR AREA?
Name of the local authority September 21-27 September 28th to October 4th change October 5th to 11th change October 12th to 18th change October 19-25 change
Bark and Dagenham 62 63.41 39.18% 98.17 54.82% 119.3 21.52% 131.51 10.23%
Barnet 43.2 86.39 267.77% 110.64 28.07% 114.68 3.65% 140.7 22.69%
Barnsley 76.56 148.66 336.85% 279.91 88.29% 457.33 63.38% 499.06 9.12%
Bath and North East Somerset 37.25 67.78 367.77% 120.03 77.09% 112.79 -6.03% 191.43 69.72%
Bedford 47.9 74.44 138.90% 81.37 9.31% 87.14 7.09% 88.29 1.32%
Bexley 28.19 56.39 141.40% 66.05 17.13% 82.97 25.62% 113.58 36.89%
Birmingham 147.92 159.31 28.64% 190.92 19.84% 227.36 19.09% 257.75 13.37%
Blackburn with Darwen 182.37 257.86 30.41% 446.24 73.06% 576.5 29.19% 774.24 34.30%
Blackpool 91.79 197.21 169.60% 288.28 46.18% 424.54 47.27% 425.97 0.34%
Bolton 244.13 265 9.80% 335.25 26.51% 442.01 31.84% 546.34 23.60%
Bournemouth, Christchurch and Poole 25.55 74.12 252.95% 134.57 81.56% 144.44 7.33% 184.91 28.02%
Bracknell Forest 25.3 40.8 212.40% 53.04 30.00% 81.6 53.85% 84.86 4.00%
Bradford 184.34 293.27 98.37% 335.14 14.28% 395.72 18.08% 481.13 21.58%
Brent 50.64 79.45 181.74% 99.16 24.81% 98.55 -0.62% 113.41 15.08%
Brighton and Hove 21.66 62.22 448.68% 82.51 32.61% 93.51 13.33% 142.67 52.57%
Bristol, city of 28.27 66.47 275.54% 156.46 135.38% 245.37 56.83% 333.64 35.97%
Bromley 27.68 55.67 242.58% 70.11 25.94% 89.97 28.33% 108.93 21.07%
Buckinghamshire 24.82 48.35 182.75% 88.98 84.03% 86.77 -2.48% 104.6 20.55%
To bury 216.24 290.59 52.89% 389.55 34.05% 430.39 10.48% 526.21 22.26%
Calderdale 97.42 173.56 135.27% 242.6 39.78% 311.65 28.46% 410.49 31.72%
Cambridgeshire 06/18 45.29 355.18% 65.34 44.27% 67.48 3.28% 82.17 21.77%
Camden 27.4 55.55 138.11% 111.84 101.33% 121.84 8.94% 109.62 -10.03%
Central Bedfordshire 23.56 37.76 67.67% 51.27 35.78% 61.67 20.28% 71.37 15.73%
Cheshire East 61.17 141.35 287.90% 168.68 19.33% 173.11 2.63% 215.8 24.66%
Cheshire West and Chester 78.12 143.7 220.12% 191.21 33.06% 199.08 4.12% 214.53 7.76%
Cornwall and Isles of Scilly 40.4 26.58 32.17% 32 20.39% 30.78 -3.81% 44.95 46.04%
County Durham 110.55 201.29 209.30% 338.05 67.94% 329.56 -2.51% 278.44 -15.51%
Coventry 74.56 108.2 95.13% 166.34 53.73% 184.11 10.68% 199.99 8.63%
Croydon 32.58 66.46 307.98% 75.25 13.23% 79.39 5.50% 105.76 33.22%
Cumbria 51.2 86.6 252.03% 121.6 40.42% 152.4 25.33% 170.2 11.68%
Darlington 103.93 176.03 358.53% 206.92 17.55% 286.51 38.46% 296.81 3.59%
Derby 43.14 82.78 124.21% 134.08 61.97% 171.39 27.83% 328.8 91.84%
Derbyshire 44.35 93.44 201.23% 144.51 54.66% 186.5 29.06% 294.63 57.98%
Devon 18.82 84.37 957.27% 105.69 25.27% 78.52 -25.71% 69.79 -11.12%
Doncaster 62.84 147.81 177.73% 220.27 49.02% 350.76 59.24% 513.64 46.44%
Dorset 11.36 25.1 352.25% 60.76 142.07% 72.39 19.14% 103.3 42.70%
Dudley 56.28 79.29 90.28% 102.3 29.02% 150.81 47.42% 224.82 49.07%
Ealing 55.29 98.01 248.91% 139.85 42.69% 162.08 15.90% 212.4 31.05%
East Riding of Yorkshire 49.83 109.33 372.06% 133.36 21.98% 172.35 29.24% 257.35 49.32%
East Sussex 14.72 30.51 359.49% 44.86 47.03% 50.43 12.42% 58.32 15.65%
Enfield 42.54 72.8 158.52% 93.77 28.80% 137.21 46.33% 138.41 0.87%
Essex 26.66 48.35 176.92% 69.97 44.72% 90.25 28.98% 99.05 9.75%
Gateshead 162.33 241.02 83.08% 255.38 5.96% 259.34 1.55% 355.84 37.21%
Gloucestershire 19.62 40.5 200.00% 62 53.09% 62.63 1.02% 68.6 9.53%
Greenwich 36.47 50.7 217.27% 75.36 48.64% 85.43 13.36% 92.73 8.55%
Hackney and City of London 55.36 101.77 311.03% 132.37 30.07% 164.35 24.16% 156.79 -4.60%
Warte 265,82 343.1 80,49% 387,91 13,06% 340 -12,35% 312,96 -7,95%
Hammersmith und Fulham 45,91 75.08 238,96% 115,59 53,96% 163.12 41,12% 190.12 16,55%
Hampshire 16.78 35.08 219,20% 55,48 58,15% 68,35 23,20% 94,32 38,00%
Haringey 40,95 89,34 192,73% 116,88 30,83% 126,93 8,60% 142,57 12,32%
Egge 42.2 95,95 244,28% 116,26 21,17% 127,81 9,93% 133,78 4,67%
Hartlepool 153,74 250,9 213,35% 274,39 9,36% 348.06 26,85% 335,24 -3,68%
Havering 58.18 60,49 80,46% 100,56 66,24% 126,76 26,05% 148,72 17,32%
Herefordshire, Grafschaft 12.97 22.3 152,83% 37,86 69,78% 54,46 43,85% 86.1 58,10%
Hertfordshire 30,94 66,83 166,79% 87,35 30,70% 90,79 3,94% 106,68 17,50%
Hillingdon 57,35 75,28 117,95% 102,32 35,92% 135,24 32,17% 160 18,31%
Hounslow 57,82 81,39 166,24% 105.7 29,87% 139,21 31,70% 177,15 27,25%
Isle of Wight 11.29 12.7 259,77% 17.63 38,82% 24.69 40,05% 31.04 25,72%
Islington 42.89 76.3 198,40% 90,32 18,37% 121,25 34,24% 126,62 4,43%
Kensington und Chelsea 24.34 81,34 262,80% 94,15 15,75% 135,14 43,54% 138,99 2,85%
Kent 16.44 34.46 240,51% 50,46 46,43% 54,25 7,51% 75,24 38,69%
Kingston upon Hull, Stadt von 35,41 95,85 555,16% 107.01 11,64% 144,74 35,26% 279.08 92,81%
Kingston upon Thames 33.24 72.11 255,57% 101,97 41,41% 144,78 41,98% 184,22 27,24%
Kirklees 118,92 192,37 106,85% 254,44 32,27% 300,37 18,05% 388,82 29,45%
Knowsley 335,41 602,54 182,30% 700,64 16,28% 663,52 -5,30% 542,88 -18,18%
Lambeth 41,71 77,6 272,00% 92,94 19,77% 122,38 31,68% 137.1 12,03%
Lancashire 160,6 246.02 139,88% 347.6 41,29% 387,44 11,46% 426,22 10,01%
Leeds 170,46 379,13 239,39% 394,63 4,09% 393,5 -0,29% 388,71 -1,22%
Leicester 111,51 140,31 23,94% 184.06 31,18% 222,46 20,86% 326.06 46,57%
Leicestershire 51.12 92,19 124,47% 161,58 75,27% 176,87 9,46% 272,89 54,29%
Lewisham 34 64.09 206,21% 77,16 20,39% 79,13 2,55% 90,57 14,46%
Lincolnshire 27,85 63,19 238,82% 92,61 46,56% 103,65 11,92% 160,93 55,26%
Liverpool 342,94 580,27 186,43% 681,47 17,44% 584,69 -14,20% 462.01 -20,98%
Luton 61,96 72,28 41,28% 89,65 24,03% 141,28 57,59% 150,2 6,31%
Manchester 307,67 558,19 215,22% 474,62 -14,97% 438,99 -7,51% 486.2 10,75%
Medway 17.59 30,87 177,36% 38,77 25,59% 45,59 17,59% 80,77 77,17%
Merton 26.63 47,93 266,72% 77,95 62,63% 95,38 22,36% 134.11 40,61%
Middlesbrough 136,19 259,61 375,30% 280,89 8,20% 351,82 25,25% 353,95 0,61%
Milton Keynes 24.86 45,28 139,20% 65,69 45,08% 63,46 -3.39% 95,75 50,88%
Newcastle upon Tyne 299,19 492,37 204,91% 466,94 -5,16% 313,39 -32,88% 312.07 -0.42%
Newham 66,26 75.04 100,75% 103,36 37,74% 129,41 25,20% 142.16 9,85%
Norfolk 17.3 38.01 228,52% 50,89 33,89% 63,89 25,55% 84,71 32,59%
Nordost-Lincolnshire 35.1 76,46 481,00% 162,32 112,29% 237,52 46,33% 339,68 43,01%
North Lincolnshire 47,59 94.03 224,02% 151,49 61,11% 170.06 12,26% 191,54 12,63%
North Somerset 27.9 39,99 56,33% 54,87 37,21% 71,15 29,67% 130,2 82,99%
North Tyneside 156,32 232,31 137,93% 251,55 8,28% 210,67 -16,25% 279,44 32,64%
North Yorkshire 67,47 113.1 188,82% 134,29 18,74% 141.09 5,06% 164,39 16,51%
Northamptonshire 24.43 60.14 198,02% 96,25 60,04% 107,53 11,72% 127,31 18,39%
Northumberland 171.2 180,19 114,38% 175,54 -2,58% 176,47 0,53% 179,88 1,93%
Nottingham 94,32 609,79 1523,94% 927,91 52,17% 610,69 -34,19% 427,46 -30,00%
Nottinghamshire 49,74 137.04 387,17% 220,47 60,88% 272,27 23,50% 325.03 19,38%
Oldham 193,58 295,64 62,27% 382,52 29,39% 468,56 22,49% 661,72 41,22%
Oxfordshire 25.59 64,48 309,14% 86,31 33,86% 89,35 3,52% 111.9 25,24%
Peterborough 35.1 62.3 223,13% 81,58 30,95% 95,92 17,58% 125.09 30,41%
Plymouth 23.27 37,77 80,03% 68,68 81,84% 103.01 49,99% 141,55 37,41%
Portsmouth 32.11 50,72 194,54% 104.7 106,43% 144,25 37,77% 163,79 13,55%
lesen 29,67 43,89 343,78% 74,79 70,40% 95,81 28,11% 109,41 14,19%
Redbridge 73.06 110,74 78,84% 125,15 13,01% 136,95 9,43% 168.4 22,96%
Redcar und Cleveland 70,73 173,53 395,80% 210,72 21,43% 280,71 33,21% 323 15,07%
Richmond upon Thames 39.39 108,58 593,36% 144,94 33,49% 153.02 5,57% 146,96 -3,96%
Rochdale 202,78 335,41 126,06% 429,83 28,15% 508,97 18,41% 574.16 12,81%
Rotherham 100,98 203.08 228,66% 279,57 37,66% 386,19 38,14% 493.2 27.71%
Rutland 42.58 85.16 580.19% 132.74 55.87% 107.7 -18.86% 95.17 -11.63%
Salford 195.49 317.19 114.36% 390.21 23.02% 495.3 26.93% 588.79 18.88%
Sandwell 113.26 114.78 19.67% 146.45 27.59% 216.17 47.61% 275.23 27.32%
Sefton 226.84 371.19 194.83% 477.19 28.56% 438.48 -8.11% 383.49 -12.54%
Sheffield 121.74 385.74 519.76% 455.16 18.00% 431.05 -5.30% 420.45 -2.46%
Shropshire 42.4 59.11 193.79% 86.34 46.07% 84.48 -2.15% 119.45 41.39%
Slough 82.92 86.93 217.03% 92.28 6.15% 155.14 68.12% 150.46 -3.02%
Solihull 90.12 119.7 61.87% 174.7 45.95% 209.36 19.84% 223.69 6.84%
Somerset 13.87 32.9 362.73% 39.13 18.94% 45.89 17.28% 61.36 33.71%
South Gloucestershire 24.2 58.58 255.25% 88.04 50.29% 118.56 34.67% 192.22 62.13%
South Tyneside 221.89 274.88 37.42% 245.07 -10.84% 235.14 -4.05% 222.55 -5.35%
Southampton 19.01 42.77 199.93% 60.19 40.73% 74.05 23.03% 114.05 54.02%
Southend-on-Sea 31.13 42.59 143.79% 48.05 12.82% 68.81 43.20% 82.46 19.84%
Southwark 47.99 60.53 114.42% 79.35 31.09% 95.66 20.55% 121.69 27.21%
St. Helens 254.17 347.76 167.24% 443.56 27.55% 437.47 -1.37% 420.85 -3.80%
Staffordshire 38.66 82.2 173.82% 121.2 47.45% 169.06 39.49% 262.4 55.21%
Stockport 110.42 227.32 162.62% 297.18 30.73% 299.91 0.92% 396.02 32.05%
Stockton-on-Tees 100.84 233.6 339.02% 342.54 46.64% 357.24 4.29% 447.43 25.25%
Stoke-on-Trent 49.54 60.46 54.99% 118.19 95.48% 192.3 62.70% 301.51 56.79%
Suffolk 8.41 33.49 298.22% 46.37 38.46% 55.03 18.68% 72.63 31.98%
Sunderland 215.7 296.72 108.61% 299.24 0.85% 321.92 7.58% 323.72 0.56%
Surrey 27.08 66.29 350.65% 83.01 25.22% 94.8 14.20% 106.58 12.43%
Sutton 23.75 36.83 162.14% 81.9 122.37% 90.14 10.06% 114.85 27.41%
Swindon 19.35 27.9 181.82% 45.46 62.94% 69.31 52.46% 103.96 49.99%
Tameside 174.4 245.48 74.84% 322.75 31.48% 371.31 15.05% 513.92 38.41%
Telford and Wrekin 43.92 56.16 173.02% 81.73 45.53% 154.01 88.44% 211.28 37.19%
Thurrock 24.09 43.02 226.16% 75.14 74.66% 122.17 62.59% 157.74 29.12%
Torbay 14.68 49.9 466.40% 82.19 64.71% 100.54 22.33% 126.23 25.55%
Tower Hamlets 62.51 85.61 164.80% 97.92 14.38% 133.64 36.48% 148.73 11.29%
Trafford 139.88 279.75 277.28% 336.63 20.33% 327.36 -2.75% 429.74 31.27%
Wakefield 86.13 163.93 243.96% 238.87 45.71% 310.64 30.05% 401.08 29.11%
Walsall 83.37 122.25 81.76% 168.84 38.11% 211.57 25.31% 305.8 44.54%
Waltham Forest 47.3 79.43 147.21% 94.95 19.54% 102.53 7.98% 135.75 32.40%
Wandsworth 37.92 71.89 243.48% 101.31 40.92% 114.35 12.87% 143.78 25.74%
Warrington 197.61 268.55 102.15% 337.6 25.71% 348.55 3.24% 406.64 16.67%
Warwickshire 40.49 70.94 98.05% 101.05 42.44% 126.14 24.83% 166.63 32.10%
West Berkshire 22.72 39.13 181.92% 49.23 25.81% 57.43 16.66% 83.94 46.16%
West Sussex 21.64 33.1 148.69% 43.06 30.09% 50.35 16.93% 73.96 46.89%
Westminster 29.08 71.18 220.63% 88.02 23.66% 108.3 23.04% 135.08 24.73%
Wigan 160.04 274.45 124.39% 407.71 48.56% 460.66 12.99% 655.99 42.40%
Wiltshire 15.2 32.8 221.57% 53.8 64.02% 68 26.39% 84.2 23.82%
Windsor and Maidenhead 31.7 80.57 335.75% 113.59 40.98% 141.33 24.42% 112.93 -20.09%
Wirral 193.82 252.77 61.86% 315.42 24.79% 267.27 -15.27% 282.71 5.78%
Wokingham 28.64 45 327.76% 61.36 36.36% 76.55 24.76% 95.26 24.44%
Wolverhampton 83.16 75.94 21.21% 133.66 76.01% 191 42.90% 246.43 29.02%
Worcestershire 43.47 70.83 232.22% 93.15 31.51% 105.24 12.98% 128.4 22.01%
York 72.64 195.14 341.89% 266.36 36.50% 307.19 15.33% 244.99 -20.25%

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