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Covid-19 deaths in England and Wales are lowest in 19 weeks


Another eight coronavirus victims were confirmed in the UK today, with NHS England announcing six more deaths and Public Health Wales two.

The early count – which includes only a fraction of Covid-19 deaths in England – is calculated by adding the deaths reported by each home nation.

The Department of Health has yet to confirm the final daily number, which is often higher as it takes into account laboratory-confirmed deaths in nursing homes and in the community.

Separate statistics released this morning show that the number of people dying from coronavirus each week in England and Wales has dropped to its lowest level in 19 weeks and there are now fewer than 200 victims a week.

Covid-19 was mentioned on the death certificates of 193 deaths recorded in the week ended July 31. This emerges from the latest report from the Office for National Statistics.

It's the lowest number of virus-related deaths since the week leading up to March 20, four days before the lockdown, when the ONS reported 103 deaths. Deaths have now been at pre-lockdown levels for four straight weeks.

At the height of the UK crisis in mid-April, around a thousand people died from Covid-19 every day and the official death toll now stands at 46,595.

However, the government's death certificate only includes victims who have had a test done to confirm they had the virus. This differs from the ONS's calculations, which include all deaths where the virus was a suspected cause.

There were 51,779 deaths from Covid-19 in England and Wales as of July 31, according to the ONS, while official figures show there were 4,208 deaths in Scotland and 855 in Northern Ireland.

Taken together, these numbers suggest that 56,842 deaths have been recorded in the UK to date, with Covid-19 listed on the death certificate.

Today's report also found that almost 700 more than average people died in their homes in the last week of July as the British are still not ready to use the NHS.

A total of 2,915 deaths were recorded in private homes in England and Wales – 676 ​​more than the five-year average.

Experts fear that people are still reluctant to seek healthcare, either because they are afraid of contracting the virus in hospitals and general practitioners' offices, or because they don't want to burden the healthcare system.

The number of people dying from coronavirus each week in England and Wales has dropped to its lowest level in 19 weeks. Covid-19 was mentioned on death certificates of 193 deaths recorded in the week ending July 31, compared to 103 in the week ending March 20

In the last week of July, almost 700 more than average people died in their homes. The British are still reluctant to use the NHS. However, deaths in hospitals and nursing homes are below the five-year average

In the last week of July, almost 700 more than average people died in their homes. The British are still reluctant to use the NHS. However, deaths in hospitals and nursing homes are below the five-year average

The hospital in England and Wales saw 600 fewer deaths than would normally be expected at this time of year, the report showed.

In early March, the NHS urged hospitals to cancel as many surgeries as possible and exterminate patients on their wards to make way for an influx of Covid-19 patients.

The move was successful and the hospitals were not overwhelmed by the effects of the virus. However, it appears to have led to a decrease in hospital deaths and an increase in the number of people passing home.

Overall, the number of deaths from all reasons in all situations was 1 percent below the five-year average. This is the seventh straight week that deaths have been below expected levels.

In the last reporting period, 8,946 deaths were recorded in England and Wales, 90 fewer than expected according to the ONS.

According to statisticians for the government-run agency, the coronavirus is likely to have caused some deaths among elderly and vulnerable people that could result in below-average deaths.

The number of deaths from Covid fell for the 15th straight week, and the number of deaths from all reasons also remained below the five-year average for the seventh week

The number of deaths from Covid fell for the 15th straight week, and the number of deaths from all reasons also remained below the five-year average for the seventh week

Broken down, five out of nine regions in England had deaths that were below the five-year average at the last count. It was most dramatic in London, where deaths were 7.8 percent below normal, and in the East Midlands, where deaths were 5.3 percent below average

Broken down, five out of nine regions in England had deaths that were below the five-year average at the last count. It was most dramatic in London, where deaths were 7.8 percent below normal, and in the East Midlands, where deaths were 5.3 percent below average

NHS can't stop normal care if a second wave of Covid-19 hits – or tens of thousands of patients die, leading doctors warn

Tens of thousands of patients could die if the NHS shuts down normal care during a second wave of coronavirus, medical leaders warned today.

Health care leaders are urged not to leave non-viral patients "stranded and in pain" again after canceling millions of appointments during the first epidemic.

In early March, the NHS urged hospitals to cancel as many surgeries as possible and exterminate patients on their wards to make way for an influx of Covid-19 patients.

The move was successful and the hospitals were not overwhelmed by the effects of the virus. But cancer charities fear that tens of thousands more patients will die over the next year because their tumors were diagnosed too late or were completely missed.

Official figures show that in England, 12,000 more than average people died suffering from illnesses unrelated to Covid, including heart attacks and strokes.

Professor Neil Mortensen, President of the Royal College of Surgeons in England, said the NHS must "never again be a pure Covid service".

He told the Guardian, "Thousands of patients waiting in distress and in pain need to make sure they can be treated."

Dr. Chaand Nagpaul, Council Chairman of the British Medical Association (BMA), warned patients in need of urgent care that they should never be "stranded" again.

According to reports, NHS England has cut its £ 400 million monthly contract with private hospitals to keep their beds in reserve in case the virus recurs.

The move will fuel fears that the healthcare system is not adequately prepared for a second epidemic, something many experts have been concerned about in recent months.

Dr. Nagpaul told the newspaper, “We cannot have a situation where patients do not have access to diagnostic tests, clinic appointments, and treatments that they urgently need and are simply stranded.

“If someone needs care – for example because of cancer, heart problems, respiratory diseases or neurological problems – they have to get it when they need it.

Broken down, five out of nine regions in England had deaths that were below the five-year average at the last count.

It was most dramatic in London, where deaths were 7.8 percent below normal, and in the East Midlands, where deaths were 5.3 percent below average.

Yorkshire and Humber (4.2 percent below), the West Midlands (4 percent below) and the east of England (3.2 percent below) suffered fewer deaths.

The four regions where deaths were above normal were in the southeast (8.1 percent above), the northeast (4.1 percent), the northwest (3.2 percent), and the southwest (1.2 percent) ).

A separate ONS report found that the number of employees fell by another 114,000 last month as the coronavirus weighed on the labor market.

There are currently around 730,000 fewer people on corporate payrolls than in March, before the country was under lockdown for fighting the deadly disease.

In the meantime, the number of applicants – which also includes some workers – rose again to 2.7 million in July 2020.

In the three months to June, the number of employees fell by 220,000 – the largest quarterly decline since 2009. And total hours worked in the quarter fell by a fifth to its lowest level since 1994.

However, the full effects of the lockdown have so far been masked by the government's massive support programs. Today's latest figures show 9.6 million jobs have been cut and the Treasury Department has disbursed £ 33.8 billion in subisidia.

Many people seem to have chosen to remain economically "inactive" rather than looking for work – which means that they stay outside the top unemployment figures.

ONS economist Jonathan Athow said: “The labor market continues recent trends, with employment falling and working hours significantly reduced as many people are on vacation.

& # 39; Figures from our main survey show that the number of people who don't have a job and aren't looking for one has increased even though they want to work.

“Furthermore, there are still large numbers of people who say they don't work hours and don't get paid.

“The decline in employment is greatest among the youngest and oldest workers, as well as among those in low-skilled occupations.

"The number of job vacancies started to recover in July, particularly in small businesses and sectors such as hospitality, but labor demand remains depressed."

According to the ONS, around 7.5 million people were temporarily unemployed as of June this year, most of them under the government's vacation program.

Around three million of them had been gone for three months or more.

In the UK, around 300,000 people were unemployed because of the pandemic but received no pay last month. However, in April and May it was more than half a million.

The redundancies increased compared to the previous quarter by 27,000 to 134,000, another sign of the future.

The number of applicants, which includes those receiving employment benefits, rose 94,400 last month to 2.7 million. It's up 117 percent, or 1.4 million, since March.

Total weekly hours worked in the UK fell a record 191.3 million, or 18.4 percent, for the quarter ended June versus the three months.

About 730,000 fewer people are now on the payroll than in March, before the country was under lockdown for fighting the deadly disease

The latest ONS figures show that the average number of hours worked per week has remained unchanged overall - although there was a slight impairment for the self-employed

The latest ONS figures show that the average number of hours worked per week has remained unchanged overall – although there was a slight impairment for the self-employed

The vacancies showed slight signs of recovery in July - but are still much lower than they were during the credit crunch

The vacancies showed slight signs of recovery in July – but are still much lower than they were during the credit crunch

It was the largest quarterly decline since estimates began in 1971, with the total number of hours reaching its lowest level since 1994.

Commenting on the latest figures, Chancellor of the Exchequer Rishi Sunak said, “Today's labor market statistics show that our unprecedented support measures, including vacation and self-employment programs, are helping to secure millions of jobs and livelihoods that otherwise could have been lost.

"I've always realized that we can't protect every job, but through our plan for jobs we have a clear plan to protect, support and create jobs to ensure that no one is left without hope."

In the face of warnings that a third of companies are planning to lay off employees in the fall, fears of a “workplaces campfire” are growing.

Many of the cuts are said to come from hospitality businesses such as hotels, restaurants and cafes, as well as stores that were on the verge of the pandemic.

The Bank of England last week predicted that unemployment would rise by a million by the end of the year.

Labor demanded plans from the government to completely abolish the vacation program from October, forcing employers to reimburse the full cost of employee wages.

Yael Selfin, Chief Economist at KPMG UK said, “With the termination of the job retention program, we expect unemployment to rise rapidly in the fourth quarter. This means that unemployment this year could average over 6 percent, compared to just 3.9 percent at present.

“The government needs to step in and help those who are likely to lose their jobs to retrain for new jobs in different sectors. It is an opportunity to improve a large part of the UK job market and create better prospects for the future. & # 39;

Figures released this week aim to confirm the UK has officially entered a recession – with GDP falling in the second quarter.

The Bank of England's latest forecast is that the economy will contract 9.5 percent this year, making it the worst downturn in a century.

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