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Couples who paid nearly £ 1,000 to break the quarantine period are among the thousands forced to flee France


A British couple who paid £ 1,000 for Eurostar business class seats and a family who drove 12 hours are among thousands forced to flee France and get home before 4am tomorrow when the country is placed on the UK quarantine list.

The holidays of up to 500,000 Britons have been ruined with the government moving in hour 11 as they try not to self-isolate for 14 days after returning to the UK.

In the meantime, France is likely to impose quarantine measures against coronavirus for people arriving from the UK "within a few days," a government source said in Paris tonight.

Grant Shapps sparked the mayhem last night when he announced the dramatic move to quarantine France but suggested that it would only apply to people "coming back from Sunday".

The Department of Transport then made it clear that the restrictions would come into effect tomorrow, instead on allegations that Nicola Sturgeon had quarantined France tomorrow to "flex its muscles".

In worse news for UK vacationers, Greece could soon be quarantined after a surge in the infection rate. As of August 12, 235 cases were recorded. There were daily new cases in the country in the 1930s towards the end of July.

  • Up to 500,000 birtons have ruined their holidays, while official estimates suggest 160,000 Britons attempt to leave France before Saturday
  • Meanwhile, French officials have suggested that the country will impose quarantine restrictions on people arriving "within days" from the British
  • "Mutual agreements are common in these situations and they are likely to be within a few days," the French government source said
  • It comes after the UK insisted that anyone arriving from France from 4 a.m. on Saturday must spend two weeks self-isolating
  • Last night, Grant Shapps wreaked havoc by falsely saying this would apply to people "coming back from Sunday" as opposed to Saturday

Vacationers Stuart and Anna Buntine spent nearly £ 1,000 on the Eurostar from France today.

Mr Buntine, 58, said outside St. Pancras: “We only got our notification this morning when we were living in Burgundy, there wasn't much internet.

“I went to bed last night and thought everything was fine. I woke up at 7am and found we had to come back here pretty sharply.

Jamie Harrison and wife Bernie, both 43, took their three children JJ (nine), Luke (six) and Nelly (three) on a 10-day camping holiday in Nice, France

Passengers arrive at Gatwick Airport from France today (picture from left to right: Joanne Edmondson, Lily Edmondson, Amelie Duncan, Madeleine Edmondson, David Edmondson).

Passengers are arriving at Gatwick Airport from France today (picture from left to right: Joanne Edmondson, Lily Edmondson, Amelie Duncan, Madeleine Edmondson, David Edmondson).

Pictured: Estelle Blanc at the age of 37

Pictured: Dylan Jones

Passengers arrive from Paris at St Pancras International Station. It was announced last night that after staying in France, people will have to self-isolate to stop the spread of Covid 19 (Image: Estelle Blanc, left, Dylan Jones, right).

“We couldn't get tickets, all websites crashed. We had to buy business class tickets today, which costs almost £ 1,000. It is what it is.

"It's a little crazy, but there's not much we can do about it, can we?"

Ms. Buntine added: "We walked away with our eyes and knew that this was a possibility. So we decided to take this risk."

The couple, who own a farm in the Midlands and run a sporting events company, said they were originally due on Monday but had to return earlier due to a work event in the quarantine window.

Follow the UK and insist that anyone arriving from France from 4 a.m. on Saturday must spend two weeks self-isolating.

"Mutual agreements are common in these situations and they are likely to be within a few days," the French government source said.

France is the world's most popular tourist destination and the British are one of the largest groups of visitors, which means the quarantine will have a devastating impact.

Regions like Brittany, Normandy, the French Riviera, and Paris itself are usually packed with Britons in August.

According to official estimates, around 160,000 British people are currently trying to leave France before the Saturday deadline.

French Transport Minister Clément Beaune said on Twitter that his government had "regretted" the UK's decision to impose a quarantine and confirmed that they would "return the favor" with similar measures.

Even so, Mr Beaune said he hoped for a return to normal soon.

The British government has closed the "travel corridor" to France after the republic suffered a surge of nearly 14,000 cases in a week.

That jump included 2,669 new infections announced on Thursday, meaning France has suffered 21.0 cases per 100,000 people in seven days.

This is above the 20 threshold set by Grant Shapps, the UK Secretary of Transport, as key to UK quarantine rules.

French Prime Minister Jean Castex on Friday declared Paris and Marseille high-risk Covid-19 zones, giving authorities more powers to put in place tighter control measures.

This means that councils can close bars and restaurants, block roads to traffic and restrict access to public transport.

Paris and Marseille, the two largest cities in France, have already made face masks mandatory in many public spaces as well as in all enclosed spaces.

France also reported that the rate of growth of the disease was fastest among people ages 15 to 44.

Among the new infections were 50 gendarmes from the southwestern city of Tarbes who had returned with a group of 82 from a deployment in French Polynesia.

France has suffered 30,388 coronavirus-related deaths – a record that is the worst in Europe after the UK and Italy.

A family of five shared how they cut their French vacation and drove 12 hours without a break to exceed the quarantine period.

Julia Burnett, 35, and Craig, 36, had already abandoned their camping holiday for fear of the worst and were only 60 miles from Calais when the announcement was made.

They drove 12 hours yesterday with their three children Rory (seven), Isabella (five) and Finley (one) from southern France to Calais.

How do I get home now? France is on the UK's quarantine list?

Travelers attempting to return from France on Friday to circumvent quarantine restrictions will have to pay hundreds of pounds.

Flights: The airfares from Paris to London are now more than six times higher than normal. The cheapest British Airways tickets are £ 452.

Flight booking website Skyscanner suggested that there are no direct flights from Biarritz to London.

The cheapest option was to take a flight to Paris, another to Belfast and a third flight just before midnight in London Stansted for a total of £ 284.

The cheapest ticket for just two flights is £ 579 on Air France connecting in Paris.

Eurostar: Cheapest ticket on the train Paris to London is £ 210, compared to £ 165 on Saturday, an increase of nearly 30 percent.

Ferries: P&O Ferries has limited availability, but a person traveling from Calais to Dover by car can purchase a ticket for £ 200.

Eurotunnel: The cost of taking the Eurotunnel Le Shuttle through the Channel Tunnel on Friday morning is £ 260. All trains after noon are fully booked.

They were supposed to be back next Wednesday, but yesterday they decided to leave Biarritz after reading rumors of a possible quarantine.

The Taunton, Somerset family was able to book a ferry less than an hour before the government announced it.

When they were 60 miles from Calais, they realized their gambling had paid off when they saw the news of the rule change. You stood in line for the crossing this morning and felt "tired but relieved".

Ms. Burnett told Spiegel: “We tried to book the Channel Tunnel, but we ended up booking on the ferry instead.

Then I checked the Tunnel website right after the announcement and I was in the queue for 5,310 – it was insane.

"The quarantine would have really affected Craig's work as he runs a dental service business and cannot do it from home."

Travelers looking to return to the UK today will have to pay hundreds of pounds as air fares for flights from Paris to London are more than six times higher than normal – the cheapest BA tickets sell for £ 452.

The cheapest ticket on a Eurostar train from Paris to London costs £ 210, compared to £ 165 last Saturday, an increase of almost 30 percent.

The cost of taking the Eurotunnel Le Shuttle through the Channel Tunnel this morning is £ 260. All trains after noon are fully booked.

P&O Ferries has limited availability, but a person traveling from Calais to Dover by car can purchase a ticket for £ 200. They also reported a surge in interest with more than 8,000 searches for tickets this morning.

Meanwhile, demand for flights from countries removed from the UK's quarantine exception list has tripled since the announcement on Thursday evening.

Many of the thousands of people affected canceled hotels and paid up to £ 150 each time on Friday morning to change tickets on high-speed trains from Paris.

"We have to go back so we pay £ 150 each for a new ticket," said Anna Possenniskie, a 45-year-old teacher from London.

Ms. Possenniskie and her husband Sam Possenniskie, 44, who runs the Yestie Boys beer company, had been booked to return from a break next Tuesday.

"It's a shame we had to cut our vacation short, but we accepted," she said. “The government must do what is necessary. We didn't lose a lot of money, but I wish we could have stayed longer. & # 39;

The Possenniskies were at the Gare du Nord, the Eurostar hub in Paris, where the trains were mostly sold out.

This meant desperate travelers lining up at the Eurostar ticket office, trying at the last minute to buy seats.

How are the UK quarantine rules set?

Decisions are made by the Joint Biosecurity Center (JBC) risk assessment, which is influenced by a number of factors including:

  • An estimate of the proportion of the population currently infectious in each country;
  • Virus incidence rates;
  • Trends in incidence and deaths;
  • Transmission status and international epidemic information;
  • Information on the testing capacity of a country;
  • An assessment of the quality of the data available

Aimee Meek, 30, a London art director, said she paid £ 80 to change her ticket and wasted £ 200 on unused hotel rooms in the French capital over the weekend.

"I'm glad I had time to change my ticket because I have to go back to work," said Ms. Meek.

"At least it's better than for those caught just four hours before quarantine in Spain, but it's ridiculous and very frustrating nonetheless."

Jasmine and Alex Webb, newly married from Devon, spent two nights in Paris on their honeymoon before returning to the UK.

"Fortunately, we should be leaving today anyway," said Ms. Webb, a 26-year-old tax officer, adding, "The quarantine won't change anything.

& # 39; The virus won't stop at borders. I think you're either banning travel altogether or letting people roam free. This whole trip is not necessary. & # 39;

The 28-year-old Webb said, "I am concerned about the situation in Devon as all the people are coming on vacation and possibly spreading the virus."

Charlotte Couture, a 27-year-old sales and marketing director from Birmingham, said the quarantine made it impossible to return to work.

“It was very important for me to get on a train today and luckily it happened. Health is a priority and we must all be sensible. The situation could get worse in the coming weeks. & # 39;

28-year-old Valentine Hutchings from London paid £ 120 to change her Eurostar ticket: "I was booked for tomorrow, but what can you do, you have to follow the rules."

Travelers who returned to the UK from France today have told of their home race to avoid being quarantined.

Yasmine Sellay, a 24-year-old student from Wimbledon in south London, was on a jam-packed Eurostar train that arrived at St. Pancras station from Paris this morning.

She said, “I wanted to go home before the restrictions were enforced. “Little did I know France was on the UK quarantine list until last night, and since I don't want to isolate for a fortnight, I came home today.

“I was in Paris for a month and a half because I originally came there to visit family and friends.

Nicola Sturgeon "prevented vacationers from getting an extra 24 HOURS to return from France": the Scottish Prime Minister insisted that the closing date should be 4 AM instead of Sunday "triggering a desperate onslaught of British to to come home."

Sources said Nicola Sturgeon insisted the deadline be earlier after UK ministers first discussed at 4 a.m. on Sunday

Sources said Nicola Sturgeon insisted the deadline be earlier after UK ministers first discussed at 4 a.m. on Sunday

Nicola Sturgeon has been accused of wreaking havoc on British vacationers today after quarantining France at 4 a.m. tomorrow.

A desperate rush has been triggered for large numbers of tourists to come home before new rules come into effect isolating arrivals from across the canal for 14 days.

Tory MP David Jones said Ms. Sturgeon appeared to be trying to "flex her muscles" suggesting it was "absolutely" a case of "the tail wagging the dog" since most of the travel was through England.

"It looks very much as if the decentralized administrations are doing what they have been doing for some time. They are different in order to be different and out of the desire to flex their muscles," the former minister told MailOnline.

“It's very hard to see that an extra day would have made a big difference.

“It would not have burdened the travelers so much. If people are returning to the UK to avoid this, they should consider who is to blame. & # 39;

It appears to be the latest example of Mrs Sturgeon attacking the UK government.

In the earlier stages of the coronavirus crisis, Prime Minister Boris Johnson has repeatedly anticipated lockdown announcements at her own briefings.

She criticized the UK government's decision to remove the "stay vigilant" message, introduced face mask rules well before England and continued to encourage people to work from home when possible.

Ms. Sturgeon said she put the independence issue aside during the coronavirus chaos and "paused" a new vote but was accused of trying to use the situation to political advantage.

When I arrived in France at the end of June, I had to stay with my relatives for more than a week and couldn't go out.

“I found it very difficult to do this and absolutely didn't want to do the same when I got back to London. The Eurostar was full so I think a lot of other people had the same idea as me. & # 39;

France-based engineers Carolina Monteiro, 24, and Douglas Pagani, 29, told PA their relief upon arriving in the UK for a 10-day motorhome trip to the Lake District and Yorkshire – just before quarantine measures go into effect on Saturday morning .

In front of St. Pancras train station, Mr. Pagani said: “We are very pleased that we have the right ticket on time. At first I was afraid to look at all of the information to make sure we could enter here, then we saw that it was perfect.

"It was a relief that we could meet our friends here."

Ms. Monteiro added, "We have planned this trip for three or four months so we are happy to be here just in time."

Travelers in the south of France are struggling to return to the UK before the quarantine expires at 4 a.m. on Saturday.

Flight booking website Skyscanner suggested that there are no direct flights from Biarritz to London.

The cheapest option was to take a flight to Paris, another to Belfast and a third flight just before midnight in London Stansted for a total of £ 284.

The cheapest ticket for just two flights is £ 579 on Air France connecting in Paris.

Regardless of the mode of transport, travelers will have to move quickly as many services will be fully booked by Friday afternoon.

He added that weekly changes to quarantine rules at the national level "have proven so disruptive to airlines and passengers".

Unimpressed passengers in London St. Pancras made their way to the Eurostar service at 10:24 am for Paris, including 60-year-old attorney John Strange of Reading.

He said he would be traveling to the French capital for 10 days and that he would be able to work from home when he returned.

He said, “It is not a disaster for me, but it seems to be a disaster for many people, especially those with young families.

"I am sure many will have to cancel their plans and accept all the pain and costs that come with it."

A traveler who named her as Sonata K, a 39-year-old dentist, was scheduled to go to Paris with her mother for four nights – but canceled her plans after learning of the quarantine measures in St. Pancras on Friday morning.

She said, “It's not worth going out and isolating yourself. With my job, I cannot do the procedures from home.

“We were too late to get the news. We're just going to find out here, but it's better than on the train.

"We want to go to Cardiff now and check the trains, but the weather is changing a little."

She added that for £ 30 they could switch their Eurostar tickets to another day and said a hotel had charged them one night for a late cancellation.

Jack Birkbeck (23) and George Raybould (24) traveled to France to spend five days in the commune of Bantanges in eastern France between Lyon and Dijon and to celebrate Jack's 24th birthday with his parents on Saturday.

The friends, who both work in retail from Maidstone, Kent, are flying to Geneva with EasyJet today.

They went to sleep thinking they didn't need to be quarantined but woke up to the news that they would have to self-isolate for 14 days.

Despite considering canceling the trip, they decided to continue as money had already been spent on the break.

Jack said, "I literally woke up at 6am when my mom texted me and said," Are you coming? "How they put quarantine. I went to sleep thinking we were safe.

“The last case we go into was on July 27th, so they've gotten strong over the past few weeks. It's probably safer than Maidstone.

“If we had more time to think about it, we might have canceled, but we didn't even have time to really change our minds.

“I hope the government is doing its best and I believe that this is now in the best interests of all.

“My boss will probably be mad that I have to isolate myself. But I'll be quarantined doing job training to make up for that. & # 39;

George added: “It is just our luck that on the day we were leaving they announced the quarantine just hours before departure.

The project managers Bertie Lawrence (33) and Elske Koelman (29) have already had relatives cancel their participation in their wedding according to the new rules

The project managers Bertie Lawrence (33) and Elske Koelman (29) have already had relatives cancel their wedding according to the new rules

Michelle Irwin (pictured with her family) is traveling from Dieppe to the UK today

Michelle Irwin (pictured with her family) is traveling from Dieppe to the UK today

France quarantine questions and answers: What are my refund rights and can I get my travel insurance?

What are my vacation refund rights?

If you have booked a package tour in France or another quarantined country, your tour operator should cancel the holiday. You can then request a full refund.

Do I get a refund for my flight, ferry or train ticket?

If the airlines keep operating the route there is no right, although they may return money as a gesture of goodwill. Ferry companies and Eurostar may offer refunds, but most companies give customers a voucher that they can rebook at a later date. Eurotunnel says there will be refunds up to 24 hours before departure.

And accommodation?

If a hotel or villa remains open and available, there is no legal right to a cancellation or refund, although some booking websites such as Airbnb and Booking.com offer last-minute cancellations on some offers.

Can I apply for flight and accommodation insurance?

These are unlikely to be covered if the policy was purchased after March 10th, when most insurers removed cover for cancellations related to Covid-19.

Can I apply for statutory sick pay in quarantine?

No – There is no automatic entitlement to statutory sick pay unless you meet the required conditions, e.g. B. Viewing Coronavirus Symptoms.

What if you pass a country on the quarantine list?

You don't need to quarantine as long as passengers stay in the car for the entire journey and no one joins them.

“As bad as it sounds, where we are going is super rural. It's not exactly the epicenter of the French pandemic. We don't go out or socialize and will be closed to ourselves.

"Of course we will still be quarantined when we return home, but I like to think that the chances we will get it are very slim and, if anything, we will give it to them sooner. That would be the classic British thing.

Robert Lawrence, 65, from Islington

Robert Lawrence, 65, from Islington

“I just got back from vacation so I don't think work can take it too well. I feel bad for my colleagues, but there isn't much I could have done on such short notice. & # 39;

A Heathrow spokesman said: “The UK needs a more sustainable long-term plan for resumption of travel than quarantine roulette.

“Tests could, in certain circumstances, provide an opportunity to safely shorten the quarantine length and protect both the health and prosperity of the nation as we pave the way for a new normal.

"As always, our teams will be available to assist passengers affected by the travel restrictions. However, we urge the government to work with us to explore a solution that could improve safety."

Relatives of a couple who are getting married in the Netherlands next month have already been canceled after the British government announced that a 14-day quarantine will apply from tomorrow to those returning from France, Malta and Holland.

Other passengers reported nightly investigations into their travel insurance to ensure their vacation could be profitable.

Elske Koelman, 29, and her fiancé Bertie Chambers, 33, are traveling to the Netherlands this morning to finalize plans for their wedding in Leiden next month.

Natalie Mills wrote to MailOnline: & # 39; We are a family currently living on the Côte d & # 39; Azur. Our scheduled flight is at 10 p.m. tonight - we desperately hope there won't be any delays! & # 39;

Natalie Mills wrote to MailOnline: & # 39; We are a family currently living on the Côte d & # 39; Azur. Our scheduled flight is at 10 p.m. tonight – we desperately hope there won't be any delays! & # 39;

They had originally considered a wedding in the UK, but in December they decided to tie the knot in a town hall in the city center of Elske's hometown in Leiden.

Elske said: “The wedding will take place in Leiden, where I was born and my family is still there.

British expat Stephen Fillery, 72, returned to his 15-year-old home in Dordogne, France today. He flew EasyJet to Bordeaux at 1:30 pm after renovating his Thames apartment in Staines, Surrey for his next tenant

British expat Stephen Fillery, 72, returned to his 15-year-old home in Dordogne, France today. He flew EasyJet to Bordeaux at 1.30pm after renovating his apartment on the Thames in Staines, Surrey for his next tenant

“I haven't seen her in a few months so we were looking forward to it, but that makes quarantine a little more difficult.

“We originally planned to get married next month and it was supposed to be 130 guests, but we've reduced it to 20 guests, half of whom are from the UK.

The couple, both business consultants living in the UK, had to reduce their wedding guest list from 130 to 20 due to the pandemic.

But the new quarantine rule now means that probably only half of the invited people can attend as Bertie's aunt and cousins ​​cannot travel due to the quarantine.

He said, “This morning we received calls from my family side that were canceled. So far, my brother and aunt can't make it.

“My mother and father are so happy in retirement that they can do it.

& # 39; We're going to the Netherlands today to finalize all the details. We need to speak to the venue, the florist, and the restaurant, especially about the quarantine. & # 39;

The couple, who both work in international development and met five years ago in Kenya, have been planning their wedding since they got engaged last year.

Jack Birkbeck (23) and George Raybould (24) spend five days in the commune of Bantanges in eastern France between Lyon and Dijon to celebrate Jack's 24th birthday with his parents on Saturday

Jack Birkbeck (23) and George Raybould (24) spend five days in the municipality of Bantanges in eastern France between Lyon and Dijon to celebrate Jack's 24th birthday with his parents on Saturday

Frenchman Leo Brettele returned to the UK in time for quarantine at Gatwick Airport today

Frenchman Leo Brettele returned to the UK in time for quarantine at Gatwick Airport today

“But now we expect that now that this quarantine is in place, there will be fewer than 20 people.

& # 39; The wedding will be in the city building with lunch in the city center. Leiden is a beautiful place, small with lots of canals and boat tours. & # 39;

The couple say the wedding will continue and plan to work from home once they travel home from the Netherlands before returning for their wedding next month.

Bertie added, “There's nothing we can do about it, it's out of our control.

“We can't cancel the wedding and our plans should go on.

“You cannot put your life on hold. We are lucky that we can both work from home. So it is worth getting married, even if we have to be quarantined after our return. & # 39;

Where will the quarantine list be added next? France pledges to retaliate on British travelers as No. 10 envisages new travel restrictions for countries with 20 coronavirus cases per 100,000 residents

France has vowed to take revenge after being placed on the UK's quarantine list last night after a surge in coronavirus cases. More countries are to be added if they exceed the threshold of 20 cases per 100,000 people per week.

Emmanuel Macron's transport minister said France "regrets Britain's decision" and "will take mutual action" after people crossing the Channel into Britain were instructed to isolate for 14 days.

Ministers closed the "travel corridor" after France suffered a surge of nearly 14,000 cases in a week, including 2,669 new infections announced last night.

The increase means France has suffered 21.0 cases per 100,000 people in one week, which is above the 20 threshold set by Grant Shapps as the key to UK quarantine rules.

The Netherlands (24.5 cases per 100,000) and Malta (56.2 cases) were also hit by travel warnings from the Foreign Office after crossing the threshold and Spain (58.8) and Belgium (29.4) on the quarantine list had set.

Switzerland (14.3), Denmark (15.3) and Greece (11.6) are also close to the limit value, while Portugal (13.5) is still subject to quarantine rules despite falling below the limit value.

Germany (8.6 cases per 100,000) and Italy (5.0) are both currently below the threshold, but both have seen alarming increases in recent weeks in cases partly related to summer vacation.

A British couple drove nine hours through the night to avoid quarantine.

They had been spending a week in their motorhome in the Dordogne when the news broke Thursday night – so they quickly gave out £ 238 on a ferry from Calais to Dover and set off.

The man and woman who asked not to be named left at midnight.

They were supposed to come home on Sunday – and they beat up Prime Minister Boris Johnson after arriving in Kent around noon.

The 55-year-old woman, a medical office administrator from Norfolk, said, “We had to do it to avoid quarantine. We just picked up all of our things, threw them in the motorhome and drove.

“We're disappointed because we loved our break there, but I just couldn't afford quarantine. It wouldn't be ideal at all.

„Ich verstehe, warum Boris dies getan hat, aber uns am Samstag eine Frist von 4 Uhr morgens zu geben, ist bei weitem nicht ausreichend.

„Er muss bedenken, dass viele Leute, die gestern Abend die Nachricht erhalten haben, nicht einfach aufstehen und gehen konnten wie wir.

„Einige wären Familien mit kleinen Kindern gewesen, die geschlafen haben. Dann ist es eine echte Eile, die Dinge am nächsten Tag fertig zu machen. & # 39;

Die Mutter von fünf Kindern fügte hinzu: "Boris und die Regierung hätten wirklich mehr darüber nachdenken sollen."

Marcus Keys, 49, hatte mit seinen beiden Kindern und seiner Frau einen einwöchigen Urlaub in Limoges verbracht.

Sie sollten heute zurück sein – und er war froh, nach Hause zu kommen.

Der Entwicklungshelfer der Wohnungsbaugesellschaft Marcus aus Birmingham sagte: "Es ist definitiv eine Erleichterung, die Quarantäne zu vermeiden – wir wollten uns nicht darauf einlassen."

Der 37-jährige IT-Manager Lewis Kitson sagte gegenüber Sun: „Dies ist nur ein komplettes Durcheinander. Es ist Chaos. Sie machen es wieder gut, während sie jetzt gehen.

'Sie können das nicht rechtfertigen. Es ist Vermutungsarbeit. Quarantäne macht mir nichts aus, wenn ich zu spät bin. Ich bin gerade auf einem Roadtrip durch Frankreich gekommen. Ich versuche zu buchen, um nach Hause zu kommen.

»Sie müssen mich ins Gefängnis bringen, bevor ich die Quarantäne einhalte.

'Das Ganze ist lächerlich. Es ist immer noch nicht genug Zeit. Ich versuche wirklich, eine Fähre zu buchen. Es ist eine Schande. & # 39;

Jamie Harrison und Frau Bernie, beide 43, nahmen ihre drei Kinder JJ (neun), Luke (sechs) und Nelly (drei) mit auf einen 10-tägigen Campingurlaub in Nizza (Frankreich).

Die Familie aus Catford im Südosten Londons hatte ursprünglich geplant, nach Spanien zu reisen, wechselte jedoch nach Einführung der Quarantäneregeln nach Frankreich.

Die Ernährungstherapeutin Bernie sagte: „Wir dachten, es würde nach dem kommen, was mit Spanien passiert ist. Ich war mental vorbereitet. Es war dort kurzfristig, also habe ich es erwartet – es liegt außerhalb unserer Kontrolle.

Passagiere, die vorsichtshalber Gesichtsmasken gegen die Ausbreitung des neuartigen Coronavirus tragen, gehen den Bahnsteig entlang zu einer Rolltreppe, nachdem sie mit einem Eurostar-Zug von Paris am Bahnhof St. Pancras International in London angekommen sind

Fares for flights from Paris to London are now more than six times higher than normal. Die billigsten British Airways-Tickets werden für 452 GBP verkauft

Fares for flights from Paris to London are now more than six times higher than normal. Die billigsten British Airways-Tickets werden für 452 GBP verkauft

Fares for flights from Paris to London are now more than six times higher than normal. Die billigsten British Airways-Tickets werden für 452 GBP verkauft

Welche Länder liegen über der Schwelle von 20 Fällen pro 100.000 Menschen pro Woche?

SPANIEN: 58,8

MALTA: 56,2

BELGIEN: 29.4

NIEDERLANDE: 24.5

FRANKREICH: 21.0

SCHWEDEN: 18.7 (aber die Quarantäne ist noch vorhanden)

DÄNEMARK: 15.3

SCHWEIZ: 14.3

PORTUGAL: 13.5 (aber die Quarantäne ist noch vorhanden)

GRIECHENLAND: 11.6

IRLAND: 10.8

ÖSTERREICH: 10.3

Großbritannien: 9.0

DEUTSCHLAND: 8.6

ITALIEN: 5.0

„Und wir haben dafür gesorgt, dass wir zwei Wochen Zeit hatten, bevor die Kinder wieder zur Schule gingen, falls Quarantäne eingeführt wurde.

„Es gibt sowieso keinen großen Unterschied zwischen Isolation und dem, was wir während der Sperrung getan haben.

„Wir sind gut vorbereitet, was wir tun müssen, um unser Immunsystem und uns vor Viren und Krankheitserregern zu schützen.

"Es liegt an jedem Einzelnen, seine Immunität zu schützen und sich nicht auf die Regierung und den NHS zu verlassen."

Ehemann Jamie, der auf dem Grundstück arbeitet, sagte: „Natürlich wollte ich nicht, dass es passiert, aber ich konnte es kommen sehen. Wir werden uns immer noch amüsieren und eine tolle Reise haben.

„Es wird nie einen guten Zeitpunkt geben, um die Quarantäne einzuführen, und wenn es getan werden muss, dann soll es so sein. Aber ich verstehe nicht, warum sie Samstag ausgewählt haben, um es umzusetzen.

„Ich denke, wenn Sie negativ testen, sollten Sie die Selbstisolierung beenden dürfen. Das macht für mich nicht viel Sinn. & # 39;

Der älteste Sohn JJ fügte hinzu: „Ich denke, Quarantäne ist schlecht und deshalb wollte ich zu Hause bleiben, anstatt in den Urlaub zu fahren. Das heißt, ich kann zwei Wochen lang nicht mit meinen Freunden spielen. & # 39;

Familien, die mit Eurostar von London nach Frankreich und Amsterdam reisen, berichteten von kurzfristigen Änderungen ihrer Reisen, nachdem spät in der Nacht neue Quarantänebeschränkungen angekündigt wurden.

Der 65-jährige Robert Lawrence aus Islington im Norden Londons erwischte heute um 11 Uhr den Eurostar auf einer Interrail, um Freunde in den Niederlanden und in Deutschland zu besuchen.

Der pensionierte Rundfunkarbeiter sagte: „Natürlich ist es ein Risiko, aber ich bin wahrscheinlich ein größeres Risiko eingegangen, als im Supermarkt herumzugehen.

„Wenn Sie sich in geschäftigen Geschäften in die Regale beugen, ist dies wahrscheinlich ein größeres Risiko als diese Reise mit sozial distanzierten Spaziergängen und Mahlzeiten im Freien.

Die Leute stehen an, um für einen Flug von British Airways zum Flughafen Heathrow einzuchecken, heute am Flughafen Nizza in Südfrankreich

Die Leute stehen an, um für einen British Airways-Flug zum Flughafen Heathrow einzuchecken, heute am Flughafen Nizza in Südfrankreich

People queue in line to check-in for a British Airways flight to Heathrow airport, today at Nice airport, southern France

People queue in line to check-in for a British Airways flight to Heathrow airport, today at Nice airport, southern France

People wait at Dover to cross the Channel to France as Transport Secretary Grant Shapps said there "has to be a cut-off" in regards to a time period for those being mandated to self-isolate on their return to the UK from abroad

People wait at Dover to cross the Channel to France as Transport Secretary Grant Shapps said there 'has to be a cut-off' in regards to a time period for those being mandated to self-isolate on their return to the UK from abroad

Transportation Secretary Grant Shapps insisted that the government took a "hands-on approach" to the new restrictions. However, the move was criticised by France's secretary of state for European affairs

Transportation Secretary Grant Shapps insisted that the government took a "hands-on approach" to the new restrictions. However, the move was criticised by France's secretary of state for European affairs

Brighton couple due to fly to Tunisia before African country was added to UK list tell how they missed France quarantine with hours to spare

Andrew Farr, 58, returned from his week-long holiday in Nice, France to Gatwick at 10.40am today  through EasyJet with partner Mourad Besbes, 56.

The couple from Brighton, East Sussex had booked several flights home as they were initially planning on going to Tunisia before that corridor was slammed shut.

Andrew, who works in PR for a tour operator, said: 'We saw that quarantine was coming in on the 10pm news on Thursday night so we are counting ourselves very lucky that we had this flight booked before we went out.

'A lot of people are going to be stuck there unable to get back before self isolation is implemented on Saturday morning but at least they've given us some notice this time.

'48 hours notice would have been nice as I reckon the government have been looking at this for the past week.

'But they're looking at the rates throughout Europe and seen that France has risen too high so it had to be done.'

Self employed caterer Mourad added: 'I thought there was going to be a mad rush to get seats on these final flights home but ours was only about 80 per cent full which was surprising.

'It took us 25 minutes to fill in this form on arrival with our details which is madness.

'But we are really lucky that is all and we can go back to our normal lives instead of quarantining.'

Meanwhile DFDS Ferries which operates from Dover to French ports including Dunkirk and Calais and from Newhaven in East Sussex to Dieppe tweeted: 'FRANCE-DOVER SERVICES: We are expecting a high volume of traffic at our French Ports today. We advise all customers to have a confirmed reservation before arriving at the Port by visiting our website at https://fal.cn/39J8d

'Please do not arrive without a confirmed booking.'

'My main concern was travel insurance and health cover.

'My policy said it does not cover travel if the Foreign Commonwealth Office our restrictions in place before I took out the policy or before I booked it.

'But I had booked it all already so it seems I am still covered and I will just quarantine when I'm back.

'The initial destination is Amsterdam via Eurostar then onto The Hague and the Cologne via train to visit friends. Then I'll return home by air.

'I wasn't planning to travel until next year but my friends invited me.

'I don't regret it because we were aware restrictions might change. It was just an informed risk and we decided to go ahead because the new restrictions were only announced last night so it was very very short notice for us.

'Everything had already been booked and we knew about the advice so we are relatively happy.

'I can quarantine when I return and I have a local supermarket that deliver food and a friend who has offered to drop things to me if needed.'

Eurostar passengers arriving in London from Paris today fear they may have to quarantine on their return to France if Emmanuel Macron introduces 'tit for tat' travel restrictions.

British expat Stephen Fillery, 72, returned to his home of 15 years in Dordogne, France today.

He flew out to Bordeaux at 1.30pm with EasyJet after renovating his flat by the River Thames in Staines, Surrey for his next tenant.

The retired Metropolitan Police officer of 30 years said: 'I'm really pleased that this overnight news about isolation from the France and the Netherlands came when it did.

'If it came earlier, I would have had to spend two weeks staying in the flat and couldn't have renovated it and done all the running around.

'If they had imposed quarantine a week ago I would not have come over so I'm relieved for my own personal benefit.

'I think it is probably highly necessary to bring in this self isolation. If the statistics have suddenly gone up then they need to make a firm and quick decision and a lot of people must have been expecting it.

'If France are going to bring in a reciprocal measure then it should be for medical scientific reasons and not just political push back at the UK.'

One man flying to Nice, France to see his brother for 10 days said he was 'bitterly disappointed' at the government's 'short notice' to implement quarantine.

The 40-year-old electrician from Surrey, who did not want to give his name, said: 'I was gutted to see them bring it in just hours before I flew out.

'If I knew a week beforehand then I would have cancelled. They should have given more warning.

'But if rates are increasing then it is reasonable for them to bring it in to stop people bringing it back here.

'I was prepared for it and thought it might come in while I'm out there but I thought I would have had more time to make a decision.

'I'm a social guy who likes to go out to see my friends and play football but I will now have to stay indoors for two weeks.

'It is what it is. I will find other ways to occupy myself, rest up, so some work at home and watch Netflix.'

Relatives wearing face masks eagerly waited for their loved ones to arrive from France in the arrivals hall at London St Pancras station.

Vehicles are driven off of a ferry at Dover after arriving from France as travellers trying to return from France on Friday to avoid the quarantine restrictions face a scramble for tickets costing hundreds of pounds

Vehicles are driven off of a ferry at Dover after arriving from France as travellers trying to return from France on Friday to avoid the quarantine restrictions face a scramble for tickets costing hundreds of pounds

Holiday makers arriving back on a ferry at Dover docks this morning after France was added to the UK quarantine list from Saturday

Holiday makers arriving back on a ferry at Dover docks this morning after France was added to the UK quarantine list from Saturday

Retired teacher Judith Hobbs, 71, flung her arms around her son and grandchildren when they arrived on one of the last Eurostar's from Paris before the new quarantine rules are implemented at 4am on Saturday.

The grandmother, from Oxfordshire, said: 'I am waiting to meet my son and my two grandchildren. They live just outside of Paris.

'We are really lucky as they were always booked onto this train arriving at 12.30pm today so we have avoided the quarantine.

'But we are still taking a bit of a risk as we do not know what restrictions will be in place in France when they return home in a few weeks.

'Emmanuel Macron has suggested the same measures could be implemented there, like a tit for tat.

'So in that case, when we drive them home we might have to quarantine in France and then quarantine again when we return to the UK.'

Mother-of-two Leanne Smith and her husband Paul, both 39, paid £3,000 on a Eurocamp holiday at a site near Paris. They were due to start the week-long trip with their young children today – but decided to drive back to Manchester after the quarantine was announced.

Leanne told the Sun: 'We were in bed in our hotel last night just waiting for the news to break. We knew it was going to be announced but we didn't want to risk losing all our money. That would've just been a nightmare.'

Carriage-carrying channel tunnel trains are fully booked until Saturday.

Eurotunnel Le Shuttle said in a statement: & # 39; Due to the government's recent announcement, our shuttles are now fully booked until tomorrow morning.

& # 39; There is no longer any ticket availability and we do not sell tickets at check-in.

"Please do not arrive at the terminal unless you have a ticket that is valid for today's trip."

Private jet charter company PrivateFly said demand for flights out of countries being removed from the UK's quarantine-exemption list has trebled since the announcement was made on Thursday night.

Chief executive Adam Twidell said: 'Following the changes to the UK's quarantine list overnight, we've received a surge in demand for private jet travel out of affected countries, with three times the average number of enquiries and bookings for flights to the UK from France, the Netherlands and Malta, before 4am on Saturday morning.

'We've also had a number of inquiries from clients booked to travel to these destinations in the coming weeks to change their travel plans in order to avoid quarantine zones.

People queue in line to check-in for a British Airways flight to Heathrow airport, today at Nice airport, southern France

People queue in line to check-in for a British Airways flight to Heathrow airport, today at Nice airport, southern France

People queue in line to check-in for a British Airways flight to Heathrow airport, today at Nice airport, southern France

People queue in line to check-in for a British Airways flight to Heathrow airport, today at Nice airport, southern France

'We can arrange flights at very short notice with the flexibility to change route at the last minute, however availability is limited as the spike in demand coincides with what is already the peak summer season for private leisure travel.'

'Here's hoping there are no delays': British family tells MailOnline how they plan on getting to UK

Natalie Mills wrote to MailOnline: 'We are a family currently in the Cote d'Azur.

'Our scheduled flight is at 10pm tonight – we are desperately hoping there are no delays!

'We decided to come away as we've stayed in a fairly remote villa and so we felt pretty safe. We would not have travelled if we had booked a hotel.

'My father in law is 86 and my father 71, so we've not done anything touristy really – just enjoyed the villa, and staring at a different four walls has been a treat in itself!

'It will be hugely frustrating if we miss the deadline as we've made a point of staying safe.'

Mr Shapps explained the BBC breakfast quarantine decision this morning as follows: "The reality is that with all of the things coronavirus-related there always had to be an interruption and we have seen this consistently, not us, just as rules had to be implemented, and like this, "If we can, why can't we?" it will always be the case.

“We have to give clear instructions and, in this case, clear laws so that people have to be quarantined.

“I just want to emphasize that it is very important that people are quarantined. Anyone returning to the UK, no matter where they come from, whether you are in a country on the travel corridor or in a quarantine country, must fill out a passenger search form at this point.

"That's the law and you may find people calling to check where you are and you will break the law if you have not been quarantined if it was a requirement of the country, that you'd come from. "

Mr Shapps said there is no need for people to be quarantined on their return to the UK from France if they do so before 4am on Saturday.

The Minister of Transport told BBC Breakfast that an estimated 160,000 vacationers are expected to return to the UK from France.

He added: “It is also a practical approach that has allowed all four parts of the UK – Scotland, Wales, Northern Ireland and England – to implement the same time at 4am with no flights in the air at least tomorrow.

“But look, I accept your point, you can always argue one way or another. We have to make a decision, and we have to do it on the basis of science and medicine, and we have done that, we have followed the advice and implemented it on that basis. & # 39;

When asked if he would encourage those returning to the UK to self-isolate even if they are outside the official quarantine period, Mr Shapps said, “This is not a legal requirement.

Ferries are seen in the Port of Dover, as Britain imposes a 14-day quarantine on arrival from France from Saturday

Ferries are seen in the Port of Dover, as Britain imposes a 14-day quarantine on arrival from France from Saturday

Ferries are seen in the Port of Dover, as Britain imposes a 14-day quarantine on arrival from France from Saturday

Ferries are seen in the Port of Dover, as Britain imposes a 14-day quarantine on arrival from France from Saturday

The quarantine is set to come in at 4am tomorrow – and with an estimated British 500,000 holidaymakers in France, a weekend of chaos looms as they try to get home

The quarantine is set to come in at 4am tomorrow – and with an estimated British 500,000 holidaymakers in France, a weekend of chaos looms as they try to get home

“But what I would tell anyone is to watch out for the signs, everyone knows what we're talking about – the persistent cough, the high temperature, the change in taste or smell, so everyone should watch out for these signs.

“But no, there is no need to quarantine unless you come back after 4am on Saturday and those are the rules.

“I think the truth is, as anyone who watches realizes, there is no perfect way to deal with coronavirus.

“Unless you have a sliding scale that says that if you stay another 24 hours you have to be quarantined for X time, another 36 hours for Y time, you know there clearly has to be a cut. away somewhere. & # 39;

Mr. Shapps added, "To be clear, the Joint Biosecurity Center has clarified our approach in this area."

The channel tunnel operator's boss has warned Getlink that many travelers may not be able to return to the UK – and told them not to show up at terminals without a booking as trains are "already quite booked".

After a week of speculation ministers responding to a worsening coronavirus situation across the channel, ministers ordered travelers returning from the popular destination to be isolated for 14 days. The move came after Boris Johnson said the UK was "ruthless" when it comes to quarantining travel, even with its "closest and dearest friends".

Mr Keefe said there was "some way to add extra trains outside of rush hour" but potential travelers would need to check online before heading to the terminal.

"The most important thing is that people understand that it will not be easy to come back and that they need to be sensible about this and not get themselves into trouble," he said.

France recorded 2,669 new cases of coronavirus yesterday, up from 2,524 on Wednesday. It's a record number for the nation since emerging from lockdown.

When the regulations were reviewed, the Netherlands, Monaco and Malta were added to the quarantine list – and Portugal remains on that list along with Spain.

The Turks and Caicos Islands and Aruba in the Caribbean have also lost their place.

“We have to be absolutely ruthless, even with our closest and dearest friends and partners. I think everyone understands, ”Mr Johnson told reporters when he visited Northern Ireland yesterday.

John Keefe, Getlink's public affairs director, told BBC's Newsnight: “We just don't have the space to take in everyone who suddenly wants to come to the coast. So we're telling people to change your online booking and make sure there is enough space before traveling to the terminal. & # 39;

Visitors wearing protective face masks queue to enter the Louvre Pyramid in Paris yesterday, hours before the quarantine announcement

Visitors wearing protective face masks queue to enter the Louvre Pyramid in Paris yesterday, hours before the quarantine announcement

Passengers returning from France scrambled to book earlier Eurostar trains, forking out hundreds of pounds extra and cutting their holidays short to avoid having to quarantine under new UK travel rules.

Carriages arriving at London St Pancras today were packed, with passengers unable to socially distance as most chairs were taken in the rush to return home.

Panicked Brits filled the platform at London St Pancras station this morning, wearing face masks and pulling their suitcases through the crowds in the mad rush to get home.

Vikesh, 27, paid over the odds to change his Eurostar ticket to return home today after only arriving in Paris last night to visit his girlfriend.

He was devastated when he received a call from his boss advising him to return home to escape quarantine rules.

He said: 'I arrived in Paris at 6pm last night to see my girlfriend who lives there. I was meant to come home on Monday.

'It is the absolute worst thing that could have happened. I am not going to see her now for so long.

'I could have not gone, but getting there at 6pm and then being told to come home by 4am Saturday is awful.

'The train was so overbooked and people were trying to space themselves out.

'I've taken the Eurostar a few times and at the moment you are not meant to sit next to another person.

'But I think people were sitting in each other's seats. I sat next to someone, but I had no choice and others stood for the whole two hours.

'I heard the news at 10.30pm last night and tried to ignore it, but I got a text from my boss saying you'd better come home.

'I woke up at 7.30am and there was only one train left for today. I paid an extra £110 on top of my original tickets.

'I also had to pay for a flight home just in case I got stuck there.

'I've not been working from home this whole time so the quarantine would affect me.

'I don't know when we'll next see each other, I guess we will have to find a country it is safe for both of us to go to.'

Teachers Dilip Chakraborti, 39, and Camille Brignolle, 41, from north London, also changed their tickets at the last minute to avoid being in quarantine when schools reopen.

The pair only had 24 hours in Paris where they arrived yesterday to visit Camille's family, and were angered to discover through Twitter of the imminent new travel restrictions.

Camille, a secondary school teacher, said: 'We were due back on Tuesday and we only arrived yesterday, so we spent literally 24 hours in Paris.

'We went to visit my dad. He lives just outside of Paris and I haven't seen him since Christmas.

'It was tricky trying to change our ticket to avoid the quarantine. Initially a ticket popped up this afternoon but it went away.

'It was supposed to be an exchange, but we had to pay an extra £224 on top of our original tickets between the two of us.

'Having just 24 hours with my dad is not great.

'I am annoyed at the fact the announcement was at 11pm of an evening on Twitter.

'I am not impressed with the government with the way they have dealt with it and the manner of it.

'Why not tell us during the day? Why tell us at 11pm on Twitter.'

She added: 'Because I am a teacher, I wanted to make sure I would not have any problems so we waited for a few weeks before booking to wait and see what was going on with the restrictions.'

Dilip, a primary school teacher, said: 'We rebooked and got an earlier train today.

'So we will have to wait and see if we can get any money back.

'If we had stayed, it would have been touch and go for me having to quarantine before the schools open at the beginning of September.

'But Camille's school opens a week early so we have to come back.'

Nicola Sturgeon 'stopped holidaymakers from getting an extra 24 HOURS to get back from France': Scottish First Minister 'insisted the cut-off should be 4am TOMORROW instead of Sunday' sparking desperate stampede of Britons to get home

British holidaymakers voiced fury at the timing of the France quarantine move today amid claims Nicola Sturgeon demanded the cut-off was brought forward.

The new rules on isolating for 14 days will take effect for anyone who arrives in the UK from 4am tomorrow, sparking a desperate stamped to get home by thousands of British holidaymakers.

But sources said the Scottish government insisted that the deadline was earlier after UK ministers initially mooted 4am on Sunday.

Mr Shapps fuelled the chaos last night when he announced the dramatic step, but suggested it would only apply to people who 'come back from Sunday'.

The Department for Transport then clarified that in fact the restrictions come into force from 4am tomorrow.

The news also broke hours later than expected, and following signals during the day that France might escape being struck off the list of 'safe' countries.

& # 39; We'll look at the dates a little later in the afternoon – right where France and other countries arrive.

“We cannot even remotely complain about our own situation.

“Everyone understands that in a pandemic, we don't allow our population to become infected again or the disease to recur.

'That is why the quarantine measures are very important and we have to apply them in very sftrict way.'

Speculation about the removal of quarantine exemptions has increased as infections rise across much of Europe.

Hundreds of thousands of Britons are either on vacation or planning to travel to France, but more than 2,500 cases were recorded yesterday – a record since the lockdown was eased.

The country appears dangerously close to the scale of 20 cases per 100,000 people over a seven-day period.

However, ministers are believed to be ready to stop restrictions if changes are announced, with the situation being closely monitored.

The quarantine list already includes Spain and Portugal. It is believed that Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland have not yet approved the adjustments.

Travelers are expected to be notified of changes approximately 30 hours in advance so they can make new arrangements if necessary.

The Netherlands (23.1 per 100,000), Gibraltar (35.6), Monaco (38.2), Malta (46.7), San Marino (53.0), the Faroe Islands (198.5), Turks and Caicos Islands (278.9) and Aruba (547.9) all have higher new cases per 100,000 values ​​than France.

On the list with a slightly lower rate than France are Denmark (15.3 per 100,000), Iceland (14.7), the Czech Republic (14.0), Switzerland (13.3) and Poland (12.7) .

All of this has now exceeded the Portuguese rate of 12.4 new cases per 100,000 people in the last seven days. Even so, Portugal remains on the list of countries from which all arrivals to the UK, including those returning from vacation, must be quarantined for two weeks.

Downing Street reminded prospective vacationers this week that "there is no risk-free way to travel overseas," and Boris Johnson added that he "would not hesitate" to introduce travel restrictions to other countries.

The latest data on foreign soil coronavirus cases is being analyzed by the government's Joint Biosecurity Center (JCB), which reports to Health Secretary Matt Hancock.

Brits in France and other countries could be forced to flee home or they could be quarantined on their return to the UK if the government decides to remove more countries from the list.

UK ministers are believed to be planning new measures for a variety of countries amid an increase in European coronavirus cases

UK ministers are believed to be planning new measures for a variety of countries amid an increase in European coronavirus cases

Woman tells how their French holiday is cut short so her children can get back to school

Emmeline Owens, 45, from Battersea, was staying in Antibes in the south of France with her husband and two children, eight and 11 years old.

She said that quarantining was 'not really' an option for them as they wanted their children to be able to return to school shortly.

'They haven't had much of an education in the last six months,' she told the PA news agency. 'If we can get in today they will be able to return to school when they're due to go back in a couple of weeks, so, yes, it (quarantine) wasn't much of an option.'

On Tuesday, the UK updated its "green list" for travel but did not remove Portugal from the quarantine list, inflicting a blow on the country's economy, which benefits greatly from UK tourism.

The UK government was warned that the cases in Portugal did not fall fast enough to safely put the country on the "green list".

On Monday, France reported the first significant increase in hospital coronavirus patients since the lockdown was lifted, although it fell again on Tuesday before rising two days after the rebound.

Earlier this week, the French prime minister urged citizens to pull themselves together amid a renewed spike in coronavirus cases.

Jean Castex said the public is becoming careless and has awakened the specter of a second lockdown after rising more than 10,000 cases in the past week.

"If we do not act together, we expose ourselves to the increased risk that the upswing of the epidemic will be difficult to control," said Castex during a visit to an intensive care unit in southern France.

Some parts of France have tightened their mask rules despite the summer heat wave. The police will now step up controls on face coverings – while neighboring Belgium yesterday made masks mandatory in all public spaces, including outdoors.

French Prime Minister Jean Castex (pictured in a hospital in Montpellier this week) has told citizens to "pull themselves together" amid a renewed spike in coronavirus cases in France

French Prime Minister Jean Castex (pictured in a hospital in Montpellier this week) has told citizens to "pull themselves together" amid a renewed spike in coronavirus cases in France

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