ENTERTAINMENT

Councils in infection hotspots launch action plans to stop the surge in COVID cases


Council presidents of infection hotspots across England are launching action plans to halt an increase in coronavirus cases and prevent further local closures.

Eden in Cumbria, Sandwell in the Midlands, Northampton, Peterborough, Rotherham and Wakefield were announced yesterday as six locations on the government's coronavirus watchlist, but no new outbreak control measures have yet been introduced.

Local authorities in these areas are now taking proactive measures as experts warn that Britain is "clearly close to the turning point where the infection is growing".

In Sandwell, where the number of cases per 100,000 people per week until July 28 has only dropped by three percent to 26, the bosses are asking residents not to allow minor visits to their homes.

The Council also encourages sheltered people to remain at home, although the Council is ending in many areas of England, Scotland and Northern Ireland as of today, and encourages anyone with Covid symptoms to be tested.

An emergency management team was set up yesterday to keep an eye on the situation after 85 positive cases were registered this week – an increase of 500 percent over the same period in June.

Sandwell Council vice-president Maria Crompton said: “The coronavirus situation in Sandwell is serious.

A message is displayed on a large electronic billboard asking people to wear a face mask in Manchester, where new restrictions have been imposed

Councils are now taking proactive measures to prevent local barriers from being imposed, as in Leicester (see picture)

Councils are now taking proactive measures to prevent local barriers from being imposed, as in Leicester (see picture)

Sandwell Council vice-president Maria Crompton said: “The coronavirus situation in Sandwell is serious

Sandwell Council vice-president Maria Crompton said: “The coronavirus situation in Sandwell is serious

"To avoid local closures, we strongly advise those who provide protection in Sandwell to continue to do so after the end of the national protection period, as local cases increase."

“We know that people who shield themselves are susceptible to Covid-19 and are more likely to get very sick or die if they are infected.

“We know that people look forward to going out again, but we strongly advise people who shield themselves to stay in position for the time being and to go out as little as possible. This applies to everyone in Sandwell who shields.

“We also ask people all over Sandwell not to get in touch with others in each other's homes.

“We know that Covid-19 spreads more easily indoors. We therefore strongly recommend that people do not go into other people's homes as the infection rate increases.

“We also need people who wash their hands regularly, wear face covers in shops and on public transport, distance themselves socially from other people and, most importantly, get a test and isolate themselves if they have symptoms.

“We really need people who follow this important advice.

"We are seeing a significant increase in coronavirus cases, and together we can do our best to avoid being blocked in Sandwell."

Council presidents in Peterborough are also calling on elderly and vulnerable residents who have been shielded since March to continue to do so.

The Council urges people to avoid gatherings of all sizes, to avoid personal shopping, to stay away from worship in places of worship where there are many other people, and to try to work from home wherever possible.

Elsewhere, people in Northampton can now be tested, even if they show no symptoms, if they feel they have been infected with the virus, as public health chiefs yesterday stressed the scale of the threat to the city.

Lucy Wightman, director of the Northamptonshire County Council for Public Health, said at a press conference that the area is not in the same league as places like Leicester and Greater Manchester, where local blocks have been imposed at different levels.

Dr. Daniel Lawson, a lecturer in statistical science at the University of Bristol, said recent figures have provided some evidence of an increase in the infection rate.

He told the Guardian: “Britain is clearly close to the turning point at which the infection grows.

"Modeling the effectiveness of interventions proves difficult because the intervention cannot be separated from the general public attitude towards risk."

Official data used by the government to monitor outbreaks also showed yesterday that the cases in Shropshire, Swindon and North Yorkshire are increasing rapidly.

Official statistics show that infections in Shropshire almost tripled in the week to July 28 and rose 280 percent after 19 people infected the virus. Overall, the Covid 19 fall rate is still only 5.9 people per 100,000 population, but the sharp rise within seven days will cause officials to closely monitor West Midlands.

65 more people were infected in Swindon over the same period, increasing the infection rate by 225 percent to 29.3 within a week. The rate of the city of Wiltshire is now higher than all but three of Greater Manchester's districts, which were hit by stringent new restrictions last night to control the spread of the virus.

North Yorkshire also saw a 200 percent increase in cases between July 22 and 28 after 18 new infections in seven days. However, the fall rate in the region with 615,000 inhabitants is still low (2.9).

The heads of Public Health England named 26 hotspots, including the cordoned off Leicester and the surrounding boroughs of Oadby and Wigston. They also admitted that they monitored outbreaks in Luton, for which further restrictions have already been imposed.

Salford was not included in the list, but all 17 other areas affected by Matt Hancock's last-minute decision to close Greater Manchester, as well as parts of Lancashire and West Yorkshire, were.

Official statistics show that infections in Shropshire almost tripled in the week to July 28 and rose 280 percent after 19 people infected the virus. Overall, the Covid 19 fall rate is still only 5.9 people per 100,000 population, but the sharp rise within seven days will cause officials to closely monitor West Midlands

Dudley in the West Midlands and Knowsley in Merseyside rounded out the top five areas in England where Covid-19 has risen fastest in the past week.

Infections increased 183 percent in Dudley and 167 percent in Knowsley. Both areas have a fall rate of 5.3 per 100,000 people.

The rise in infection rates does not necessarily mean that these areas are most likely to be affected by local Leicester-style closures, as officials look at the overall case rates.

If England is broken down according to this metric, it shows that Blackburn with Darwen is still the worst affected by the virus.

Eighty-three people per 100,000 people are infected in the community, but that number has dropped nine percent week by week after restrictions were tightened earlier this month.

10 areas where infection rates are highest per 100,000 people

Blackburn with Darwen 83.3

Oldham 57.3

Leicester 55.7

Bradford 8/8

Trafford 39.3

Calderdale 36.7

Swindon 29.3

Rochdale 27.3

Manchester 27.2

Sandwell 26

10 areas where infection rates are lowest per 100,000 people

Dorset 0.3

Redcar and Cleveland 0.7

Portsmouth 0.9

North Tyneside 1.0

Gateshead 1.0

Devon 1.0

Sunderland 1.1

St. Helens 1.1

Bromley 1.2

Norfolk 1.2

Only two people from the same family are allowed to visit another household in the Lancashire Authority, and each must wear face masks in an enclosed public space. This differs from the national guidelines, according to which two households of any size can meet inside.

The numbers show that Oldham – one of the 10 areas in Greater Manchester with more Covid 19 restrictions today – has the second worst fall rate in England.

Every week, 57.3 people contract the disease, an increase of around 90 percent compared to the past seven days.

Residents throughout Greater Manchester, Blackburn with Darwen, Burnley, Hyndburn, Pendle, Rossendale, Bradford, Calderdale and Kirklees are no longer allowed to mix with other households indoors or in a garden to reduce Covid-19 infections.

But people can still visit pubs, restaurants, cafes, shops, and places of worship as long as they are people they live with and avoid interacting with others outside of their bladder. The measures will be reviewed in a week.

Professor Chris Whitty said coronavirus cases are increasing in the UK as ministers have pushed lockdown easing "to its limits".

Professor Chris Whitty said coronavirus cases are increasing in the UK as ministers have pushed lockdown easing "to its limits".

Six high-risk Covid-19 areas designated by the ministers still have restrictions

In six areas of England on the government's "watch list" for coronaviruses, even stricter measures to combat outbreaks need to be taken.

The heads of Public Health England named 26 hotspots, including the cordoned off Leicester and the surrounding boroughs of Oadby and Wigston.

They also admitted that they monitored outbreaks in Luton, for which further restrictions have already been imposed.

Salford was not included in the list, but all 17 other areas affected by Matt Hancock's last-minute decision to close Greater Manchester, as well as parts of Lancashire and West Yorkshire, were.

Six authorities on the list – Eden in Cumbria, Sandwell in the Midlands, Northampton, Peterborough, Rotherham and Wakefield – still need to be subject to stricter coronavirus control guidelines.

According to the NHS numbers released today, weekly Covid 19 infection rates are falling in all of these areas.

The Northampton outbreak is the fastest sinking, dropping 39 percent in a week to 9.2 cases per 100,000 people.

Rotherham's infection rate fell 31 percent to 11.7, while Peterborough's infection rate fell 17 percent to 17.4 and Cumbria's infection rate 14 percent to 10.

In Wakefield, a region in Yorkshire where the new blocking measures were introduced last night, or in Sandwell in the West Midlands, however, the number of cases has not declined so much.

Wakefield's infection rate only dropped 2 percent in the week ending July 28, to 12.8 cases per 100,000 people, government data shows. At Sandwell, it fell 3 percent to 26 percent.

Leicester still has the third highest infection rate in the country, although it was forced to retreat to the lockback in June. 55.7 people per head are infected each week.

Bradford in West Yorkshire (45.8 per 100,000) and Trafford in Greater Manchester (39.3) top the top 5 worst infection rates.

It comes when the Prime Minister announced today that he had "pressed the brake pedal" at a press conference in Downing Street to ease the blockade.

Mr. Johnson warned that Covid 19 cases had "sneaked in" and the government had no choice but to postpone further cases.

The prime minister had planned to re-open casinos and bowling alleys by August 1, and to allow crowds at live sports events. However, this was postponed "at the earliest" to August 15, as infections increased across the country.

Mr. Johnson also announced that mandatory facial wear is being expanded to include galleries, cinemas, and places of worship.

I, Johnson, said, “With these numbers, our assessment is that we should now press the brake pedal to keep the virus under control.

& # 39; On Saturday August 1st, we hoped to reopen a number of higher-risk hires in England that remained closed. I'm afraid we're postponing these changes by at least a fortnight today.

"That means that until August 15th, the earliest casinos, bowling alleys, ice rinks and the remaining close contact services must remain closed, indoor appearances will not be resumed, pilots of larger crowds will not take place in sports facilities and conference centers, and wedding receptions of up to 30 People are not allowed, but ceremonies can of course continue to take place according to Covid's security guidelines.

He added: "I know that the steps we take will be a severe blow to many people, anyone whose wedding plans have been disrupted or who are unable to take the oath now as they would wish, and do so I'm really very sorry but we just can't take the risk. & # 39;

Mr. Johnson said that the new face covering rules will apply from August 8, with police enforcement to ensure that members of the public comply with the rules.

He said: “We will extend the requirement to wear face covering to other interiors where you are likely to come into contact with people you don't normally meet, such as museums, galleries, cinemas and places of worship.

"We now recommend wearing facewear in these environments that will be legally enforceable as of August 8th."

The announcement came when it became known that the Covid 19 cases in England had risen to a seven-week high and the R rate could now be above the dreaded one level in both the northwest and south-west, as growing Fears of a second wave.

Government statistics today admitted that there is "enough evidence now" to prove that Covid-19 infections are on the rise. It is estimated that 4,200 people now contract the virus in England alone every day.

The National Statistics Office (ONS), which measures the size of the outbreak by wiping thousands of people, said the number of new daily cases two weeks ago was only 1,700.

One in 1,500 people currently have the corona virus – 0.07 percent of the population. Nursing homes and hospitals are not included in this figure.

Boris Johnson said today that they "cannot ignore this evidence" when he announced that he was "applying the brake pedal" to loosen the coronavirus lock.

The scientific advisors at number 10 have also increased the R rate in the UK today, saying they now believe it is between 0.8 and 0.9. Since May it was only 0.7.

SAGE also revealed the growth rate – the average number of people infected by each Covid-19 patient – that may have exceeded one in the southwest, where the hot spots for stays in Devon, Cornwall, and Dorset are located.

And they said it would probably be the same height in the northwest. Matt Hancock announced stringent new closures last night in Greater Manchester and parts of Lancashire and Yorkshire.

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