ENTERTAINMENT

Coronavirus Vaccine In Weeks For NHS Workers


Frontline NHS workers are slated to get a coronavirus vaccine within a few weeks as the government wants to speed up the schedule for a mass induction.

An email an NHS Trust chief sent to his staff that The Mail saw on Sunday shows the health service is preparing for a national immunization program before Christmas.

It can also be disclosed that the government has put in place new laws that would allow the UK to bypass the EU approval process if a safe and effective trick is in place before the end of the post-Brexit transition period on December 31st.

The move will bolster optimism that Boris Johnson will soon be able to ease the social constraints that have crippled the country since March through a “groundbreaking” vaccine.

In his memo to staff earlier this month, Glen Burley, General Manager of the NHS Trust at George Eliot Hospital in Warwickshire, wrote, “Our trust, along with NHS organizations at the national level, has been directed to be ready to run a vaccination program for Covid-19 workers to start in early December.

"The latest findings are that a coronavirus vaccine should be available this year, giving NHS staff priority before Christmas."

Frontline NHS workers are slated to get a coronavirus vaccine within a few weeks as the government wants to speed up the schedule for a mass induction. An email an NHS Trust chief sent to his staff that The Mail saw on Sunday shows the health service is preparing for a national immunization program before Christmas. (Above is the memo from Glen Burley, General Manager of the George Eliot Hospital NHS Trust in Warwickshire)

It can also be disclosed that the government has put in place new laws that would allow the UK to bypass the EU approval process if a safe and effective trick is ready before the end of the post-Brexit transition period on December 31st

It can also be disclosed that the government has put in place new laws that would allow the UK to bypass the EU approval process if a safe and effective trick is in place before the end of the post-Brexit transition period on December 31st

Despite continued criticism, Mr Hancock has pushed through new legislation to remove the authority of the European Medicines Agency to approve the vaccine if it is ready before the end of December. Instead, British guard dogs can speed up their production. (File image of an experimental Covid drug that is being tested)

Despite continued criticism, Mr Hancock has pushed through new legislation to remove the authority of the European Medicines Agency to approve the vaccine if it is ready before the end of December. Instead, British guard dogs can speed up their production. (File image of an experimental Covid drug that is being tested)

Mr Burley added that the vaccine "is expected to be given in two doses 28 days apart" and urged colleagues to get a flu shot by the end of November so they can qualify for a Covid-19 injection.

Diane Wake, executive director of the Dudley Group's NHS Trust, said at a recent hospital board meeting, “I hope that a Covid-19 vaccine will be available to healthcare providers by December. It has not been confirmed yet, but I hope to be able to offer our staff a Covid-19 vaccine. & # 39;

In other developments that arose yesterday:

  • There was anger and frustration in Wales at the “absurd” lockdown restrictions on the sale of non-essential items, which meant customers could buy vodka but not baby clothes.
  • Professor Neil Ferguson, the controversial academic whose modeling heavily influenced the national lockdown in March, has been accused of scare tactics after saying that if families are allowed to mingle on Christmas Day, people will catch Covid-19 and die.
  • When 1.4 million people were thrown into the highest Tier 3 restrictions across South Yorkshire, another 174 deaths and 23,012 new confirmed cases were announced for the past 24 hours.
  • Hotel tycoon Sir Rocco Forte called for Matt Hancock to be fired for his "shambolic" management of the crisis, as a poll found 49 percent of respondents believed the health minister had violated a beverage curfew in a commons bar , compared to only nine percent thought he didn't;
  • Rishi Sunak has asked tax officials to find ways to illustrate the crippling financial burden of the pandemic and has urged them to be released along with the case and death statistics.
  • Banks were furious when it was revealed that Barclays had allocated more than £ 745m in bonuses than last year, and Lloyds will keep most of its 65,000 employees working from home until at least next spring.
  • Psychologists said Covid-19 could cause birth rates to drop, people to stay single longer, and women to become more promiscuous.
  • The global death toll topped 1,147,000 as police battled young protesters angry about restrictions in the Italian city of Naples, and Polish President Andrzej Duda revealed he had tested positive for the virus.

Despite continued criticism, Mr Hancock has pushed through new legislation to remove the authority of the European Medicines Agency to approve the vaccine if it is ready before the end of December. Instead, British guard dogs can speed up their production.

One health official said, "While we still believe the vaccine is expected to be ready early next year, Matt wants the freedom to operate if things move faster."

The official added that with the 2012 amendments to the Medicinal Products Regulation for Human Use that came into force on October 16, the UK "will no longer be subject to the EU process if a vaccine is developed before 2021 and that there is strong evidence that it is sure of high quality and is effective & # 39 ;.

The memo describes a vaccination program that frontline NHS staff like this surgeon will be the first to receive

The memo describes a vaccination program that frontline NHS staff like this surgeon will be the first to receive

They added: “Should a vaccine be available before the end of the year, we have taken solid steps to allow the Medicines and Health Products regulator to approve the vaccine for UK patients. This will only happen if there is a strong public health justification and the EU process takes too long. "

In any event, the regulator will have the autonomy to approve vaccines for the UK from 2021.

A senior government source said: "We have made sure that a vaccine that has been shown to be safe and effective is not prevented from using it by the need for approval from Brussels."

NHS workers will most likely receive the vaccine, which is being developed by Oxford University and pharmaceutical giant AstraZeneca and is in the final stages of studies.

The government has already bought 100 million doses of the drug, which is given in two doses. Under the government's plans, frontline NHS workers and nursing home workers will be vaccinated first, followed by those over the age of 80.

Human trials with the Oxford vaccine have been ongoing since April, involving around 20,000 volunteers around the world. Scientists have reported a "robust immune response" and no serious side effects.

Last night David Eltringham, executive director of the NHS Trust at George Eliot Hospital, said, "We don't have a specific date for the vaccine to be delivered, but we are preparing to start using the vaccine in early December."

Oxford's Covid Jab & # 39; only tested on 500 over 70s & # 39;

From STEPHEN ADAMS for the mail on Sunday

Britain's leading Covid vaccine has only been tested on around 500 elderly people in that country, raising questions about how effective it could be for a vital segment of the population.

There are high hopes for the Oxford University “ChAdOx” engraving, but only about 1,000 of the 10,000 people recruited into the UK arm of the Oxford process are 70 years or older. Half of them received the vaccine and the other half a placebo.

Last night, former Vaccination Czar David Salisbury said the relatively small numbers may not be enough to produce a meaningful result.

"If you just got 500 vaccinated and 500 got the placebo and you want to see a significant difference in protection between the two, you may not be getting much of the data," he said.

However, he added that early results seemed to show that older people given Covid vaccines developed good immune responses, so he hoped they would work well in the elderly.

The problem is critical as the virus is much more deadly in the elderly. An 80-year-old is about 1,000 times more likely to die of the virus than a 20-year-old, while five out of six Covid-related deaths have occurred in those over 70.

Earlier this month, Kate Bingham, head of the UK's Vaccine Taskforce, gave a clear signal that Covid vaccination should target the elderly, although vaccines are often less effective in this group as their immune systems tend to be less responsive.

For example, the flu vaccine given in 2016-17 was completely ineffective in those over 65, according to Public Health England. However, it has worked well for younger people.

Because Oxford's Covid vaccine works in a different way, there is no particular reason to believe it is a dud in the elderly, but all leading jab contenders are well aware of the problem.

Oxford has started parallel studies in Brazil, South Africa and the USA – but only the American “arm” registers over 65-year-olds. AstraZeneca, which handles the U.S. litigation requests, refused to say how many over 65s have been hired there to date.

Britain's BLEAK in the middle of winter: Britain records 23,012 more Covid cases – 2,482 more than yesterday – as Professor Lockdown warns people will become infected with viruses and die if allowed to mix on Christmas Day

By KATIE WESTON for MailOnline

The UK has recorded 23,012 more Covid-19 cases, 2,482 more than yesterday when Professor Neil Ferguson warns that people will "catch the virus and die" if allowed to mix on Christmas Day.

There were 174 deaths within 28 days of a positive test, compared with 224 on Friday, including 33 deaths in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland and 141 deaths in England.

Meanwhile, Professor Ferguson, whose modeling today resulted in the original March lockdown, said schools may have to be closed to older students if house mixing restrictions fail to curb the rise in infections, and that this is a "political judgment" will be. whether the rules will be relaxed during the Christmas season.

Speaking to today's broadcast on BBC Radio 4, he said: “There is a risk of transmission and there will be consequences. Some people will die of infection that day.

“But if it's only a day or two, the effects are likely to be limited. So this is really a political judgment about costs versus benefits. & # 39;

It follows the prospect of a family Christmas, which was further confused yesterday when Downing Street insisted that relatives gather – but a minister warned that this would not be "normal".

Professor Ferguson added, “That (ban on shuffling households) should have a significant effect, but so far we have not definitely been able to see it.

“If we go beyond that, there is a limit to what we can do to reduce contacts without, for example, reaching the older years in schools and sixth grade colleges, where we know older teenagers can convey as adults .

“Of course, nobody wants to switch even partially to virtual education and close schools. The challenge could be that otherwise we will not be able to get the gears under control. & # 39;

Yesterday the UK announced 20,530 infections and the deaths of 224 people. Last Saturday, the Ministry of Health recorded 150 coronavirus victims and another 16,171 cases.

Numbers tend to be lower over the weekend due to a delay in laboratory testing.

In the meantime, Dr. Nick Scriven, former president of the Society for Acute Medicine, said yesterday evening that cancellations are "inevitable" in large areas of healthcare.

He said, "I think it is unrealistic to expect trusts across the country to meet electoral goals set in the current climate."

The scientist (above), whose modeling led to the original lockdown in March, said of the loosening of the rules: "Some people will die because they will be infected that day."

The scientist (above), whose modeling led to the original lockdown in March, said of the loosening of the rules: "Some people will die because they will be infected that day."

NHS trusts in Chesterfield, Northampton, Newcastle and Nottingham confirmed yesterday that they are postponing at least some non-urgent activities, while Rotherham, Liverpool, Bradford and Plymouth announced similar measures last week.

Dr. Rob Harwood, chairman of the British Medical Association (BMA) hospital advisory committee, said trusts had no choice but to limit the planned treatments for patients.

He told The Guardian, "As winter approaches, many trusts are likely to have no choice but to further curtail their elective care services, which is incredibly worrying for both staff and patients as the residue builds and the Health conditions may worsen. "

Dr. Nick Scriven, past president of the Society for Acute Medicine and Consultant Physician, added, “I think this will be inevitable in large areas of healthcare as the pandemic and winter coincide.

"We know that the number of beds is low compared to other countries and that with the necessary infection control processes the" functioning "of our data is slowed down on a broad front."

Emily Robertshaw spoke about the difficulties her 14-year-old son will face after his life-changing cochlear implant surgery is delayed.

The mother told Channel 4 News, “I have yet to give him the news and he'll be back later and it's going to be very difficult. He needed a lot of support to prepare for the operation.

"He has significant learning difficulties, so the preparation was enormous."

Emily Robertshaw introduced herself with her 14-year-old son, whose life-changing cochlear implant surgery has been delayed. The mother used to say, "I have yet to give him the news and he'll be back later and it's going to be really difficult."

Emily Robertshaw introduced herself with her 14-year-old son, whose life-changing cochlear implant surgery has been delayed. The mother used to say, "I have yet to give him the news and he'll be back later and it's going to be really difficult."

Professor Ferguson said schools may have to close to older students if restrictions on mixing households fail to stem the rise in coronavirus infections (Image: an empty classroom at Manor Park School and Kindergarten in Cheshire)

Professor Ferguson said schools may have to close to older students if restrictions on mixing households fail to stem the rise in coronavirus infections (Image: an empty classroom at Manor Park School and Kindergarten in Cheshire)

Normal Christmas is "wishful thinking," says SAGE consultant

The idea that "we can go on as we are" and have a normal Christmas "is extremely wishful thinking," said a government academic adviser.

Professor John Edmunds, a member of the Scientific Advisory Group on Emergencies (Sage), said "radical measures" would be needed to contain the surge in coronavirus cases, especially in regions with high virus incidence.

Prof Edmunds, who told MPs on Wednesday that tens of thousands of deaths could occur during this wave of the pandemic, said further action was needed to end the cases.

He said a breaker is needed across the country, or at least in areas with high incidence.

“The only way we can have a relatively safe and normal Christmas is to take radical action now to reduce the incidence – at least in areas with high incidence – and keep the incidence low across the country by implement a package of measures to reduce social contacts, ”he said.

"The idea that we can carry on as we are and have a Christmas that we can normally celebrate with friends and family is extremely wishful thinking."

Professor Ferguson also warned that the NHS will not be able to cope with the current surge in coronavirus cases, saying that while infections were decreasing in 18-21 year olds, they continued to increase in other age groups .

He explained: “Unfortunately, in every other age group, the number of cases continues to rise at about the same rate as before.

“There is little evidence of a slowdown, for example in the North East of England, but we are not seeing the kind of slowdown we really need to get over it.

& # 39; It is a worrying situation. We now have 8,000 people in the hospital with Covid. That's about a third of what we were at the height of the pandemic in March.

& # 39; If the growth rate stays as it is, it means that in a month in March we will be above this high and that is likely not sustainable.

& # 39; We are at a critical time right now. The health system will no longer be able to cope with this growth rate. & # 39;

Professor John Edmunds, a member of the Government's Scientific Advisory Group on Emergencies (Sage) and the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, said his own group had been studying how interventions over the winter might work, but these were not requested by the government.

Von Sage said, "We haven't been specifically asked to be honest about various policies, so no one is asking us to say," Well, what are we going to do here? "

"So these are things that we really took on ourselves and decided to look at ourselves."

Wise documents yesterday revealed that only 1 in 10 people will stay home for two weeks when asked to self-isolate.

Of those who were told they were in close contact with a confirmed Covid-19 case, only 10.9 percent were isolated for the following 14 days.

Government scientists claimed the crucial R-rate had dropped slightly, and a number of statistics found that cases are no longer growing as fast as they used to, although the epidemic is still on the rise (Image: Boris Johnson in London yesterday).

Government scientists claimed the crucial R-rate had dropped slightly, and a number of statistics found that cases are no longer growing as fast as they used to, although the epidemic is still on the rise (Image: Boris Johnson in London yesterday).

UK Chief Scientific Advisor Sir Patrick Vallance, Mr Johnson and Chancellor of the Exchequer Rishi Sunak attend a coronavirus briefing Thursday. The UK announced 20,530 more coronavirus cases yesterday

UK Chief Scientific Advisor Sir Patrick Vallance, Mr Johnson and Chancellor of the Exchequer Rishi Sunak attend a coronavirus briefing Thursday. The UK announced 20,530 more coronavirus cases yesterday

The Christmas chaos, as No10 says, families MAY gather this year, but the minister warns that it will not be "normal"

The prospect of a family Christmas was further puzzled yesterday when Downing Street insisted that families gather – but a minister warned that this would not be "normal".

The mixed messages came as politicians desperately tried to control a surge in coronavirus cases – with lockdowns tightened in many areas.

There are strict restrictions on people meeting indoors in much of the UK but they asked if families should give up hope of meeting. A spokesman for Number 10 said: “The Prime Minister has previously made it clear that he is confident that we can in many ways get some aspects of our lives back to normal by Christmas.

"As I said, it was clear to us that this year the family would be able to celebrate Christmas."

The comments contrasted with Treasury Secretary Steve Barclay's stance in a round of interviews yesterday morning.

He said, "I think few people expect it to be exactly as it normally is because we will be living with this virus for some time."

The study, carried out by King & # 39; s College London, was discussed at its September meeting.

The researchers collected data from a sample of 31,000 people between March 2 and August 5.

Based on responses to an online questionnaire, the team found that only one in ten reported being in isolation for two weeks when required by the test and trace scheme.

This is much less than the 65 percent who said they would be quarantined when they received the warning.

There are strict restrictions on people meeting indoors in much of the UK but they asked if families should give up hope of meeting. A spokesman for Number 10 previously said: “The Prime Minister has previously made it clear that he is confident that in many ways we may be able to get some aspects of our lives back to normal by Christmas.

"As I said, it was clear to us that this year the family would be able to celebrate Christmas."

The comments contrasted with Treasury Secretary Steve Barclay's stance in a Friday morning interview.

He said, “I think few people expect it to be exactly as it normally is because we will be living with this virus for some time to come.

“And the chief physician and the chief scientific advisor were very clear about this.

"But your point really was the families' ability to spend Christmas together – something we all hope to be able to do."

A government science advisor has said the idea that we can go ahead and carry on as we are and have a normal Christmas holiday is extremely wishful thinking.

Professor John Edmunds, a member of the Scientific Advisory Group on Emergencies (Sage), said "radical measures" would be needed to contain the surge in coronavirus cases, especially in regions with high virus incidence.

Data shows Covid-19 patients die faster in hospital than before - in a week instead of two. A timescale is shown in which men die between 40-49 (top), 50-59 (middle), and 60-69 (bottom) after the onset of symptoms (the lower axis is days since the onset of symptoms). The orange is the first wave and the blue is the second wave

Data shows Covid-19 patients die faster in hospital than before – in a week instead of two. A timescale is shown in which men die between 40-49 (top), 50-59 (middle), and 60-69 (bottom) after the onset of symptoms (the lower axis is days since the onset of symptoms). The orange is the first wave and the blue is the second wave

PHE data shows that after at least five weeks of continuous increases, after at least five weeks of continuous increases, the number of cases per 100,000 people in the hardest hit regions appeared to rotate and began to decrease in the week ending October 11. London had significantly lower infection rates

PHE data shows that after at least five weeks of continuous increases, after at least five weeks of continuous increases, the number of cases per 100,000 people in the hardest hit regions appeared to rotate and began to decrease in the week leading up to October 11. London had significantly lower infection rates

Second Tory MP stokes anger over free school meals

Two Tory MPs landed in hot water after controversial comments about free school meals.

Selaine Saxby hinted in a Facebook post that hotel companies that hand out food shouldn't get government aid despite the pandemic.

Meanwhile, in a fire tweet, Ben Bradley was accused of "stigmatizing working class families" after which cash went to "crack dens and brothels".

Both MPs were severely criticized and Mr Bradley was asked to apologize, while some said Mrs Saxby should resign.

It comes as Civil Society Minister Baroness Barran defended the decision not to extend free school meals over the school holidays.

In a sign of unity, hospitality companies and councils turned away from the government, saying they would provide free meal vouchers during the break.

The move followed a high profile campaign by Manchester United and England footballer Marcus Rashford, who was named an MBE earlier this month for his efforts.

Prof Edmunds, who told MPs on Wednesday that tens of thousands of deaths could occur during this wave of the pandemic, said further action was needed to end the cases.

He said a breaker is needed across the country, or at least in areas with high incidence.

“The only way we can have a relatively safe and normal Christmas is to take radical action now to reduce the incidence – at least in areas with high incidence – and keep the incidence low across the country by implement a package of measures to reduce social contacts, ”he said.

"The idea that we can carry on as we are and have a Christmas that we can normally celebrate with friends and family is extremely wishful thinking."

Shadow Chancellor Anneliese Dodds said the only way to save the festive season is by imposing a circuit breaker lock now – something Labor has been calling for.

She told BBC Breakfast: “The animal system has not yet helped to reduce infections.

“What we are unfortunately seeing – given the government does not seem willing to change that when the halftime break comes up – what we are seeing at Christmas is an increasingly difficult situation in many parts of the country. & # 39;

Two Tory MPs have now landed in hot water after controversial comments about free school meals.

Selaine Saxby hinted in a Facebook post that hotel companies that hand out food shouldn't get government aid despite the pandemic.

Ben Bradley was accused of "stigmatizing working class families" in a fire tweet, after which cash went to "crack dens and brothels".

Selaine Saxby (pictured) hinted in a Facebook post that hospitality companies that hand out food shouldn't get government aid despite the pandemic

Ben Bradley (pictured) was accused of "stigmatizing working class families" in a fire tweet, after which cash went to "Crack Dens and Brothels".

Selaine Saxby (left) hinted in a Facebook post that hospitality companies that hand out food shouldn't get government aid despite the pandemic. Ben Bradley (right) was accused of "stigmatizing working class families" in a fire tweet, after which cash went to "crack dens and brothels".

Cafes, pubs and restaurants offer free school meals to local children during halftime after MPs rejected Marcus Rashford's campaign (pictured on FareShare in Manchester).

Cafes, pubs and restaurants offer free school meals for local children during halftime after MPs rejected Marcus Rashford's campaign (pictured on FareShare in Manchester).

Only one in ten stays home for two weeks when asked to self-isolate

Only one in ten stays home two weeks after being instructed by NHS Test and Trace to self-isolate.

Of those who were told they were in close contact with a confirmed Covid-19 case, only 10.9 percent were isolated for the following 14 days.

The alarming numbers undermine the premise of the test and trace system, which is designed to prevent the virus from spreading.

The main reasons for the improper quarantine were because there were no symptoms, there was no need to stay away from people outside the household or to go to the stores to buy groceries.

The numbers were revealed in documents from Sage – the emergency scientific advisory group.

The study, carried out by King & # 39; s College London, was discussed at its September meeting.

The researchers collected data from a sample of 31,000 people between March 2 and August 5.

Based on responses to an online questionnaire, the team found that only one in ten reported being in isolation for two weeks when required by the test and trace scheme.

This is much less than the 65 percent who said they would be quarantined when they received the warning.

Both MPs received harsh criticism and Mr Bradley was asked to apologize, while some said Mrs Saxby should resign.

Civil Society Minister Baroness Barran defended the decision not to extend the free school meals over the school holidays.

In a sign of unity, hospitality companies and councils turned away from the government, saying they would provide free meal vouchers during the break.

The move followed a high profile campaign by Manchester United and England footballer Marcus Rashford, who was named an MBE earlier this month for his efforts.

Greater Manchester reached the highest alert level, Tier 3, on Friday morning and Wales put in place its two-week lockdown on "fire safety" at 6pm last night.

Coventry, Stoke and Slough entered Tier 2 today, while talks between Westminster and Heads of State in Nottingham about possible Tier 3 restrictions continued yesterday.

The UK announced 20,530 more coronavirus cases and the deaths of 224 people yesterday, but official data suggests that the country's outbreak may be slowing.

Positive tests were up 31 percent last Friday from 15,650, and deaths were up 65 percent in a week.

However, government scientists claimed the crucial R-rate had decreased slightly, and a number of statistics found that cases are no longer growing as fast as they used to be, although the epidemic is still growing.

SAGE estimates that the UK's reproductive rate fell for the first time in a month from 1.3-1.5 to 1.2-1.4. The number – the key measure in number 10's plan to fight the virus – must stay below one or the outbreak will continue to grow.

Scientific advisors have also been warned that the coronavirus could mutate and become more contagious, according to SAGE papers.

NERVTAG (New and Emerging Respiratory Virus Threats Advisory Group) said the UK is unable to study these mutations in depth and whether they are harmful.

It is one of several papers released by the government yesterday that provides some insight into how scientists are managing the pandemic.

Only one in ten stays home two weeks after being instructed by NHS Test and Trace to self-isolate. The alarming numbers undermine the premise of the test and trace system (file photo)

Only one in ten stays home two weeks after being instructed by NHS Test and Trace to self-isolate. The alarming numbers undermine the premise of the test and trace system (file photo)

The main reasons for the improper quarantine were that there were no symptoms, that it was not necessary to stay away from people outside the household or to look for food in the shops (file photo).

The main reasons for the improper quarantine were that there were no symptoms, that it was not necessary to stay away from people outside the household or to look for food in the shops (file photo).

The SAGE files: Papers submitted to the government claim Covid-19 is mutating

Scientific advisors have been warned that the coronavirus is mutating and could become more contagious, according to SAGE papers.

NERVTAG (New and Emerging Respiratory Virus Threats Advisory Group) said the UK is unable to study these mutations in depth and whether they are harmful.

It is one of several papers released by the government yesterday that provides some insight into how scientists are managing the pandemic.

The idea was explored in a scientific report submitted to the Scientific Advisory Group on Emergencies (SAGE), which then submits the results to the government for information on health policy.

Another document shows, as scientists have found, that London has so far avoided a “second wave” of the magnitude that happens in other major English cities such as Liverpool and Manchester.

Experts speculate that this is due to the fact that a larger part of the capital's population has immunity to the coronavirus after it was already there, compared to the northwest, which did not have infections as high as London in the first wave.

The idea was explored in a scientific report submitted to the Scientific Advisory Group on Emergencies (SAGE), which then submits the results to the government for information on health policy.

Another document shows, as scientists have found, that London has so far avoided a “second wave” of the magnitude that happens in other major English cities such as Liverpool and Manchester.

Experts speculate that this is due to the fact that a larger part of the capital's population has immunity to the coronavirus after it was already there, compared to the northwest, which did not have infections as high as London in the first wave.

Research by the government, supported by Imperial College London, shows that the capital has twice as many people with antibodies as the national average (13 percent), while the South West has the lowest (three percent).

This has given them some sort of immunity to recapture the coronavirus, or at least be protected from something other than mild illness, it is believed.

The number of people hospitalized in London in the last week was 464 – roughly double what it was at the beginning of the month. But that's well past the peak of the first wave, when 883 people were hospitalized in a single day in March, an analysis by the Evening Standard found.

In a meeting on September 10, before the six or tiered lockdown rule was introduced to control the rapid rise in cases, the scientists discussed the current state of the crisis.

The log read: “Major cities, except London, appear to have seen a faster increase in transmission than other areas.

“Although there is still variability between areas, it is almost certain that R is greater than 1 in much of England.

"This suggests that the epidemic is moving from a concentration in local outbreaks to a more widespread transmission."

MANCHESTER OPENS THE NIGHTINGALE HOSPITAL

The NHS Nightingale Hospital in Manchester will reopen next week as the city is locked on site.

A local NHS chief announced today that the makeshift hospital set up at Manchester Central Conference Center would be back on stream before the end of next week. It will be the first in England to reopen.

It had closed in June when the UK's first wave of the outbreak burned out, but there are now fears that local hospitals will again be inundated with Covid patients.

The nightingale is not used to treat seriously ill people with coronavirus, but is opened to add capacity for "additional rehabilitation".

The NHS nightingale for the Northwest was mothballed in June when the last coronavirus patient was discharged from the UK's first wave. Local health bosses say it will reopen at the end of next week

The NHS nightingale for the Northwest was mothballed in June when the last coronavirus patient was discharged from the UK's first wave. Local health bosses say it will reopen at the end of next week

After a week of dispute between the government and Mayor Andy Burnham, the city will enter the third tier lockdown rules from midnight on Friday as the city has one of the highest infection rates in England.

In an announcement this morning, Professor Jane Eddleston, head of Manchester University's NHS Trust, confirmed that the nightingale would be reopening.

"We're going to open the nightingale, we expect it to be around the end of next week," she said.

"The nightingale is not used as a facility for intensive care, nor was it used as a facility for additional rehabilitation of patients in the first phase."

Professor Eddleston said there are around 95 people in intensive care beds with Covid-19 in the city, which is just over a third of the 260 at the height of the epidemic in April.

Despite the drop in coronavirus case numbers, the NHS had to keep beds ready for patients with the disease all summer, she said. Healthcare in the region has set up Covid-free zones so other patients can continue to receive treatment.

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People can be seen leaving Cardiff city center as the pubs close before Wales goes into a two-week fire lockdown at 6pm on Friday

People can be seen leaving Cardiff city center as the pubs close before Wales goes into a two-week fire lockdown at 6pm on Friday

Sheffield revelers are in town for one final night tonight before their town is placed under the strictest level three lockdown

Sheffield revelers are in town for one final night tonight before their town is placed under the strictest level three lockdown

(tagsToTranslate) Dailymail (t) Nachrichten (t) Christmas (t) NHS (t) Boris Johnson (t) Coronavirus