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Coronavirus UK: The charity sector is losing 25,000 jobs, with 35,000 at risk


The charity sector lost 25,000 jobs in the Covid crisis, with another 35,000 expected to follow as fundraisers cease, charity shops shut down and donations dry up

  • In a survey of 455 UK charities, 19 percent have made layoffs
  • Another 23 percent plan to make further cuts once the vacation program ends
  • However, charities expect demand to grow 68 percent over the next six months

The charity sector has lost 25,000 jobs due to the coronavirus crisis. Another 35,000 are expected to follow as fundraisers end, charity shops close and donations dry up.

In a poll of 455 UK charities, 19 percent have made layoffs, and another 23 percent plan to cut further once the government's vacation program ends, according to Pro Bono Economics.

It was previously announced that 5,400 jobs have been lost in the charity sector since the pandemic began.

However, research now suggests the real number is closer to 25,600 – with layoffs expected to increase by the end of the year.

The charity sector has lost 25,000 jobs due to the coronavirus crisis. Another 35,000 are expected to follow as fundraisers end, charity shops close and donations dry up. Pictured: Charity Shops in Woodbridge, Suffolk

In a poll of 455 UK charities, 19 percent have made layoffs (figures above).

In a poll of 455 UK charities, 19 percent have made layoffs (figures above).

Another 23 percent plan to make further cuts once the government's vacation program ends (figures above).

Another 23 percent plan to make further cuts once the government's vacation program ends (figures above).

The steep incidence of job losses is believed to lead to a painful contraction in charity supplies across the country, at a time when hundreds more are likely to depend on them.

UK unemployment is expected to double before Christmas as economic uncertainty persists. Charities expect demand to grow 68 percent over the next six months.

This pressure is expected to continue until 2022.

It comes after Chancellor Rishi Sunak announced in April a £ 750 million grant to charities.

However, the funds have largely been used for causes compounded by the Covid-19 outbreak, and they do not cover estimated funding through a shortfall of around £ 10 billion.

Mr Sunak said at the time that the government would not be able to cover every pound of spending the sector would normally have received this year.

This means 98 percent of charities across the country have been forced to take action themselves to respond to the financial challenges posed by Covid-19.

The steep incidence of job losses is believed to lead to a painful contraction in charity supplies across the country, at a time when hundreds more are likely to depend on them. Pictured: Sign in to Oxfam in Barnard Castle, County Durham

The sharp rise in job losses is believed to result in a painful contraction in charity supplies across the country, at a time when hundreds more are likely to depend on them. Pictured: Sign in to Oxfam in Barnard Castle, County Durham

The study found that 98 percent of charities across the country had taken action to respond to the financial challenges posed by Covid-19

The study found that 98 percent of charities across the country had taken action to respond to the financial challenges posed by Covid-19

Matt Whittaker, CEO of Pro Bono Economics said, “Charities have been under extraordinary pressure since the pandemic began, dealing with the perfect storm of increased demand and limited resources.

“So far they have responded with their typical resilience and inventiveness, but the months ahead are likely to be even more difficult.

& # 39; With the recession and rising unemployment, the social sector was never needed again. An alarming proportion of jobs in the industry are now at risk.

"That means many of the charity workers who have provided vital support to millions across the country since the Covid crisis began, face a very uncertain future."

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