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Coronavirus UK: Rishi Sunak introduces cash for Tier 2 companies


Rishi's new rescue package

  • Tier 2 lockdown companies receive grants of £ 2,100 per month, potentially benefiting 150,000 businesses. At full utilization, this could cost £ 1.2 billion.
  • The Job Support Scheme has changed so that employers only pay 5 percent of unemployed hours – up from a third – and the minimum threshold for hours worked is one day per week instead of 33 percent. The Treasury Department said the cost is unclear as JSS will be "demand driven" but "billions".
  • Self-employed grants rose to 40 percent of average profit, with the maximum amount increasing from £ 1,875 to £ 3,750. Officials said the grants are now expected to cost £ 3.1 billion through January – and could double that if the higher rate is maintained through April.

Rishi Sunak today unveiled another billion pound bailout package to keep the self-employed afloat and keep bars and restaurants, which lay off millions of workers, from lockdowns.

In a dramatic Commons statement, the Chancellor stepped up support for sectors such as the hospitality industry after a wave of anger over “loopholes” in his existing provision.

He said he had listened to industry leaders and realized that "open but difficult companies need further support".

"Their message was clear – the impact of health restrictions on their businesses is worse than hoped," he said.

Mr. Sunak admitted that he could not provide exact figures for the total bill because the systems were "demand-driven".

But it seems that today's announcements mean the government will spend £ 20 billion more over the next six months on just three flagship programs – more than £ 200 billion total to prop up the economy.

They will sound the alarm in the face of soaring spending after it is revealed the government has borrowed more than £ 1 billion every day to date during the pandemic.

The bold moves were welcomed by the companies, but Greater Manchester Andy Burnham raged that he would have agreed a tier three financial package this week if he had known they were coming.

If there are significant changes to the Job Support Scheme, the government will pay more of the reduced hour staff costs, with only a 5 percent contribution from employers to unemployed hours instead of 33 percent.

There will be a minimum of one day per week of 33 percent – lowering the threshold for classes to be a "viable" job. The new system is expected to cost £ 1 billion a month for every 2 million people who use it – that could be £ 12 billion over the next six months.

Companies in Tier Two high risk areas can receive grants of up to £ 2,100 per month. The move is backdated to fend off criticism from hotspots in the north that have been restricted for months.

Mr Sunak said 150,000 across England could benefit, with the cost potentially reaching £ 1.2 billion over the next six months. Additional money is given to Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland for their own programs.

The package for self-employed is being expanded enormously. By April, the grants will increase from 20 percent to 40 percent of average profit – meaning the maximum quarterly payment is now £ 3,750. The cost through January is estimated at £ 3.1 billion, but could double by spring if the higher rate is maintained.

While businesses forced to close in the toughest Tier 3 areas have access to significant funding, less is available for high-risk Tier Two regions like London and Essex – despite the ban on mixing households in Indoor spaces mean that many of them are under pressure.

Tory MPs are increasingly alarmed about the loophole and warn that the crisis will continue well into next year. Shocking official figures today show that 17 percent of businesses in the lodging and catering industry are at “serious” risk of bankruptcy.

In a dramatic Commons statement, the Chancellor stepped up support for sectors such as the hospitality industry after a wave of anger over “loopholes” in his existing provision. Mr. Sunak (right) and Robert Jenrick (left) held a executive round table this morning ahead of the announcement

The new system means that overall workers could receive less than under the previous arrangements – but employers will make far fewer contributions. The employer's contribution is only 5 percent of the hours not worked, which could be just 4 percent of the previous total wage, as shown here

The government has spent huge sums on coronavirus response while tax revenues have declined

The government has spent huge sums on coronavirus response while tax revenues have declined

An additional £ 36.1 billion was borrowed in September – the third highest month on record and compared to just £ 7 billion a year ago – when tax revenues plummeted and the Treasury released bailouts

When the Chancellor poured more money into the struggling British plc:

Who can apply for the rescue programs and how?

Jobs Support Scheme

The program is open from November 1st to the end of April 2021.

Employers can make a claim online via Gov.uk from December.

The government pays monthly wage subsidies in arrears.

You will receive grants after the employee is paid and will be reported to HMRC via an RTI return.

Self-employed scholarships

The self-employed grants are provided by HMRC and they operate an entitlement service.

To be eligible, individuals must have completed a self-assessment tax return from 2018 to 2019 and have a trading profit of no more than £ 50,000.

If persons are not eligible due to the 2018-2019 tax return, earlier years can be taken into account.

The next grant will be granted from November to January and then from the beginning of February to the end of April.

The first will be set at 40 percent of the average profit up to the cap and HMRC will review the amount of the second grant "in due course".

The grants are subject to income tax and social security contributions.

Corporate grants

Businesses can apply to local authorities for grants of up to £ 2,100 per month if they have been "severely affected" by barriers but not officially closed.

The town halls receive funding based on the number of hotel, hotel, bed and breakfast and leisure businesses in their area.

For properties with a pro rata value of £ 15,000 or less, the grants are £ 934 per month. Reasonable values ​​between £ 15,000 and £ 51,000 will receive £ 1,400 per month. and at £ 51,000 grants will be £ 2,100 a month.

This corresponds to 70 percent of the subsidy amounts for legally closed companies.

  • The talks to classify Nottinghamshire in the “very high risk” category are expected to close shortly.
  • Boris Johnson tried to bypass Andy Burnham by offering £ 60million coronavirus aid directly to local councils in Greater Manchester.
  • Economists warned that lockdowns were killing even more people than they "could possibly save";
  • Labor's Angela Rayner apologized after calling a Tory MP "scum" during a Covid-19 debate.
  • 191 more coronavirus deaths were reported yesterday, with daily cases hitting a record 26,688;
  • Hospitals have increased the cancellation of routine surgeries and non-Covid appointments as the number of viruses has increased.
  • Scotland Yard agreed to withdraw a letter asking pubs and restaurants to sniff out their customers.
  • Prince William spoke of the "unimaginable challenges" cancer patients face due to the coronavirus.
  • National debt has risen to its highest level in 60 years.
  • An important report warned that Covid-19 cannot be used as an excuse for delaying welfare reform.

Speaking to MPs today, Mr. Sunak said there were "difficult days and weeks ahead".

"Let me first speak to the people in Liverpool, Lancashire, South Yorkshire and Greater Manchester and other areas who are moving into or already living under increased health restrictions," he said.

“I understand your frustration, people need to know that this is not forever. These are temporary restrictions to help control the spread of the virus.

“There are difficult days and weeks ahead, but we will do it together. People are not alone. We have an economic plan that protects the jobs and livelihoods of the British, wherever they live and whatever the situation. & # 39;

Mr. Sunak said, “I have always said that we need to be ready to adjust our financial support as the situation develops, and we do that today.

'These changes mean that our support will reach a lot more people and protect a lot more jobs.

“I know that many people are becoming concerned about themselves, their families and communities by introducing more restrictions.

"I hope the increased government support can be part of the country that unites in the coming months."

Mr. Sunak cemented his position as the leading hawk in the cabinet and attacked Labor's support for a "blunt" national "breaker" lockdown.

"Just like in this crisis, we will listen to people's concerns and respond when the situation calls for it," he said.

"And I don't apologize for reacting to changing circumstances and that's why we're moving on today."

He added, "The evidence is clear – a regional, tiered approach is the right way to control the spread of the virus."

How the government's new JSS regulations would collapse for a worker who normally has a full-time wage of £ 1,100 a month. They can also get a universal loan, depending on the circumstances

How the government's new JSS regulations would collapse for a worker who normally has a full-time wage of £ 1,100 a month. They can also get a universal loan, depending on the circumstances

Meanwhile, Boris Johnson met Iraqi Prime Minister Mustafa Al-Kadhimi on Downing Street today

Meanwhile, Boris Johnson met Iraqi Prime Minister Mustafa Al-Kadhimi on Downing Street today

According to ONS figures, there is now a “serious” risk of going bankrupt for almost a fifth of hotel companies

Today's figures from ONS indicate that almost a fifth of hotel companies are exposed to a “serious” risk of bankruptcy

During the crisis, the government borrows over £ 1 billion a day

The crippling effects of the coronavirus on public finances have been exposed in new figures showing the government borrowed more than £ 208 billion over a six-month period.

Another £ 36.1 billion was borrowed in September – the third highest month on record and compared to just £ 7 billion a year ago – when tax revenues plummeted and the Treasury released bailouts.

This means that £ 208.5 billion has been added to the UK's mountain of debt since April – almost four times as much as all of last year.

It's around £ 1.14 billion a day.

National debt at the end of last month was £ 2.06 trillion, 103.5 percent of the economy as a whole. According to the Office for National Statistics, the ratio has not been worse since 1960.

The staggering numbers will raise new concerns about a dire accounting of tax hikes and austerity measures if the government has to balance the books.

Companies that have to close in the third stage, such as betting shops and soft play centers, can leave their employees with two-thirds of their wages.

But there has been an outcry from Tier Two hotel companies whose business models have been ruined by restrictions that mean people can no longer socialize indoors.

Tier 2 restrictions now apply to many of the most densely populated parts of the country, including London, Birmingham, York, Essex and the North East.

As part of the Jobs Support Scheme (JSS), which will be officially introduced from November 1, employee wages can be raised to 77 percent of normal wages.

The state and the employer each finance 50 percent of the cost of the hours not worked. However, critics have warned that the system does not provide companies with enough incentive to keep employees.

But Mr Sunak cut the cost of the employer's contribution and the state took more of the bill.

The Treasury Department has modeled a cost of £ 1 billion per month for every two million people in the system.

That would cost £ 6 billion over the next six months, although much of that money was already tied up.

However, the bill could go up dramatically as more people sign up.

Mr Sunak also increased the amount of profits covered by the upcoming Self Employment Grant from 20 percent to 40 percent, meaning the maximum grant will be increased from £ 1,875 to £ 3,750.

According to the Treasury, this means a further £ 3.1 billion in support for self-employed between November and January alone.

If the next grant for February through April is held at the higher rate, it would be roughly the same again.

Companies borrow £ 4.6 billion from Treasury in a month

New Treasury Department figures today show companies raised around £ 4.6 billion in Covid-19 support loans last month.

The data shows that 6,509 companies borrowed £ 1.71 billion from the Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan between September 20 and October 18.

Meanwhile, 75,380 businesses have borrowed £ 2.18 under the bounce back credit system.

Around 57 companies have borrowed around £ 730m from the coronavirus loan program for large business disruption.

Torsten Bell, General Manager of the Resolution Foundation think tank, said, “Rishi Sunak has now created a functional part-time work schedule that companies can actually leverage. A guideline that can work in both the real world and spreadsheets.

“The Chancellor did absolutely the right thing today. Going earlier (given the obvious flaws) would have saved more jobs, but at least we are in the right place 10 days before the job support program goes into effect. & # 39;

Adam Marshall, director general of the UK chambers of commerce, said a number of the steps outlined by the chancellor responded directly to calls from chambers across the country.

"Retrospective grants for Tier 2 hotel businesses and increased grants for the self-employed will help ease pressure on many of those who have been particularly vulnerable to the economic impact of the pandemic," he said.

& # 39; The real test of these reforms will be whether they help local businesses weather the difficult months ahead.

"This is a very significant improvement in support for businesses grappling with the impact of increasing restrictions across the UK."

Frances O & # 39; Grady, Secretary General of the British Trades Union Congress (TUC) said: “Today’s action is progress, but there are still major gaps in the government’s plan.

“Low wage earners will face real difficulties when they are on less than 80% of their wages and support for the self-employed is still inadequate.

“The Chancellor should have increased support for all workers to at least 80%, and we still need adequate sick pay for people who are forced to self-isolate.

Accommodation and food companies warn of the risk of bankruptcy

Almost four in ten companies in the hospitality and food industries say they have a moderate or severe risk of bankruptcy.

The shocking scale of the problem was evident in the numbers released by the ONS today.

Around 17 percent of the sector responded to a survey that they were "seriously" threatened with bankruptcy.

Another 21 percent said the risk was "moderate".

The level was far higher than in other major economic sectors that were less directly affected by Covid.

"As the public health crisis deepens across the country, we will continue to maintain pressure on the government to protect jobs and livelihoods, and we will continue to urge ministers into job creation, quality training and significant increases to invest. " to universal credit. & # 39;

Carolyn Fairbairn, Director General of the CBI said, “The Job Support Scheme will be a welcome and much-needed follow-up to the vacation program and will protect many livelihoods when it begins.

“It is absolutely right that companies contribute if they want to access this system. In a difficult winter, however, significantly higher government contributions to unemployment in all regions will do even more to protect people's livelihoods.

"The lack of the middle of tier 2 pubs, cafes and theaters where demand is fading but little additional support will be relieved when the anomaly ends."

Stephen Phipson, Managing Director of Make UK said: "The Chancellor has said he will work hard to protect jobs and today's statement is another important step, in particular to make the job support program much more accessible to employers . "

Jonathan Geldart, Director General of the Institute of Directors, said: “More help for the self-employed is another positive, but there is still a huge void.

& # 39; The exclusion of small business directors, who are an integral part of the dynamic entrepreneurial heart of our economy, from key support programs becomes all the more urgent as the virus spreads. It is deeply frustrating that this issue has still not been resolved. & # 39;

Mike Cherry, chairman of the Federation of Small Businesses, said, “At a time of immense struggle for many small businesses, these measures will help protect jobs, businesses and livelihoods.

"The Chancellor has shown her willingness to be flexible and adapt interventions if the second wave of the virus escalates."

The police officer in charge of enforcing the UK coronavirus lockdown says even he doesn't know the rules

The official who led the national police's response to the pandemic yesterday admitted he was unaware of the lockdown rules.

Owen Weatherill told MPs the new three tier system was too confusing and the public needed simpler news.

The deputy chief of police proved his point by failing to make it clear that households in tier 2 areas are not allowed to mix indoors.

When asked on this subject, he could only answer: “I do not have the rules in front of me, so I cannot give you a definitive answer.

"There are so many different variations – I'm not familiar with all of the rules."

Another police chief also slipped during the farce session of the Commons Home Affairs Committee.

Andy Rhodes, Chief Constable of Lancashire, said, "The big step for me to move from Tier Two to Three is that your household doesn't mix with others in your household – mix with people from another household or out to eat goes out. "

New figures from the Treasury Department today show that companies raised around £ 4.6 billion in Covid-19 support loans last month.

The data shows that 6,509 companies borrowed £ 1.71 billion as part of the coronavirus business interruption loan between September 20 and October 18.

Meanwhile, 75,380 businesses have borrowed £ 2.18 under the bounce back credit system.

Around 57 companies have borrowed around £ 730m from the coronavirus loan program for large business disruption.

Pub and restaurant bosses today hailed Mr. Sunak's "new vacation program" to help those in the hospitality industry – as others warned, it will still be a tough winter for many.

The Chancellor has presented another rescue package to increase support for affected companies that suffer from tier two lockdown and self-employed.

As part of the job support program, the government will now pay a larger share of the staff costs for working time reductions, with only a five percent contribution from employers instead of 33 percent.

Companies in high-risk Tier Two areas can also receive grants of up to £ 2,100 per month to help fend off criticism from hotspots in the north that have been restricted for months.

Mr Sunak spoke in the House of Commons today that 150,000 businesses across England could benefit from the move, at a cost that could potentially reach £ 1 billion.

State support for the self-employed has also been increased. By April, the grants had increased from 20 percent to 40 percent of average profit – meaning the maximum quarterly payment is now £ 3,750.

Business leaders today hailed the recent bailout with Dame Carolyn Fairbairn, Director General of the Confederation of British Industries, calling the program "a welcome and much-needed successor to the vacation program".

Dame Carolyn said today: “It is right for companies to contribute if they want to access this system.

"But given a harsh winter, significantly higher government contributions to non-working hours in all regions will do even more to protect people's livelihoods."

Ms. Fairbairn said that "the lack of center of pubs, cafes and theaters in Tier 2 along with other businesses across the UK that are in decline but with little additional support will be relieved when this anomaly comes to an end".

"This is a big step towards a more standardized approach to supporting level two and three areas, as well as businesses that are at and within difficult times," she said.

While businesses forced to close in the toughest Tier 3 areas have access to significant funding, less is available for high-risk Tier Two regions like London and Essex – despite the ban on mixing households in Indoor spaces mean that many of them are under pressure.

Tory MPs are increasingly alarmed about the loophole and warn that the crisis will continue well into next year.

Shocking official figures also show that 17 percent of companies in the lodging and catering industry are at “serious” risk of bankruptcy.

Business leaders today hailed Mr. Sunak's bailout as "a very significant improvement in support for businesses grappling with the effects of increasing restrictions across the UK".

A spokesman for the UK Chambers of Commerce added: "The Chambers have been advocating increased support for companies experiencing a sharp fall in demand due to new restrictions, and a number of the steps announced today, including lowering employer contributions and the number of hours worked, to qualify for the program to respond directly to our calls.

"Retrospective second-tier hotel grants and improved self-employed grants will help ease pressure on many of those who have been particularly vulnerable to the economic impact of the pandemic."

Rebecca McDonald, Senior Economist at the Joseph Rowntree Foundation, said: "Holding back the coming wave of unemployment is not an easy task, and it is right that the Chancellor has taken steps to protect more jobs and address the shortcomings in the winter economic plan fix the grants and support for businesses, employees and self-employed.

“With four million workers in poverty before the coronavirus, we cannot expect people to stay afloat with an ever smaller fraction of their existing income if their costs have not changed.

“It is true that more support will now be available for people working in companies that are experiencing a loss of demand, not just for forced closings. However, this has to be enough for workers and their families to have a roof over their heads and food on the table through a very difficult winter. & # 39;

Pub and restaurant chefs welcome Rishi Sunak's "new vacation program" to help the hospitality industry and the self-employed … but warn that winter will STILL be a tough winter for many

Pub and restaurant chefs today welcomed Rishi Sunak's "new vacation program" to help those in the hospitality industry – winter is still going to be a tough winter for many, as others have warned.

The Chancellor has presented another rescue package to increase support for affected companies suffering from tier two lockdown and the self-employed.

As part of the job support program, the government will now pay more of the staff costs for reduced hours, with only a five percent contribution from employers instead of 33 percent.

Companies in high-risk Tier Two areas can also receive grants of up to £ 2,100 per month to help fend off criticism from hotspots in the north that have been restricted for months.

Mr Sunak spoke in the House of Commons today that 150,000 businesses across England could benefit from the move, at a possible cost of £ 1 billion.

State support for the self-employed has also been increased. By April, the grants had increased from 20 percent to 40 percent of average profit – meaning the maximum quarterly payment is now £ 3,750.

Business leaders today hailed the recent bailout with Dame Carolyn Fairbairn, Director General of the Confederation of British Industries, calling the program "a welcome and much-needed follow-up to the vacation program".

Dame Carolyn said today: “It is right for companies to contribute if they want to access this system.

"But in the face of a harsh winter, significantly higher government contributions to non-working hours in all regions will do even more to protect people's livelihoods."

Frau Fairbairn sagte, dass "die fehlende Mitte von Pubs, Cafés und Theatern in Tier 2 zusammen mit anderen Unternehmen in ganz Großbritannien, bei denen die Nachfrage nachlässt, aber mit wenig zusätzlicher Unterstützung, erleichtert sein wird, wenn diese Anomalie ein Ende findet".

"Dies ist ein großer Schritt in Richtung eines standardisierteren Ansatzes für die Unterstützung von Bereichen der Stufen zwei und drei sowie von Unternehmen, die in schwierigen Zeiten tätig sind und in ihnen tätig sind", sagte sie.

Während Unternehmen, die gezwungen sind, in den härtesten Tier-3-Gebieten zu schließen, Zugang zu erheblichen Finanzmitteln haben, steht für Tier-Two-Regionen mit hohem Risiko wie London und Essex weniger zur Verfügung – obwohl das Verbot der Vermischung von Haushalten in Innenräumen dazu führt, dass viele von ihnen unter Druck geraten.

Tory-Abgeordnete sind zunehmend alarmiert über die Lücke und warnen davor, dass sich die Krise bis weit in das nächste Jahr hinein fortsetzen wird.

Schockierende offizielle Zahlen zeigen auch, dass 17 Prozent der Unternehmen in der Beherbergungs- und Verpflegungsbranche einem „schweren“ Risiko der Insolvenz ausgesetzt sind.

Wirtschaftsführer lobten heute die Rettungsaktion von Herrn Sunak als "eine sehr bedeutende Verbesserung der Unterstützung für Unternehmen, die mit den Auswirkungen zunehmender Beschränkungen in ganz Großbritannien zu kämpfen haben".

Ein Sprecher der britischen Handelskammern fügte hinzu: „Die Kammern haben sich für eine stärkere Unterstützung von Unternehmen eingesetzt, bei denen die Nachfrage aufgrund neuer Beschränkungen stark zurückgegangen ist, und eine Reihe der heute angekündigten Schritte, einschließlich der Senkung der Arbeitgeberbeiträge und der Anzahl der Stunden gearbeitet, um sich für das Programm zu qualifizieren, direkt auf unsere Anrufe zu reagieren.

"Rückwirkende Zuschüsse für Hotelunternehmen der zweiten Stufe und verbesserte Zuschüsse für Selbstständige werden dazu beitragen, den Druck auf viele derjenigen zu verringern, die besonders anfällig für die wirtschaftlichen Auswirkungen der Pandemie waren."

Rebecca McDonald, Senior Economist bei der Joseph Rowntree Foundation, sagte: „Es ist keine leichte Aufgabe, die kommende Welle der Arbeitslosigkeit zurückzuhalten, und es ist richtig, dass die Bundeskanzlerin Schritte unternommen hat, um mehr Arbeitsplätze zu schützen und die Mängel im Winterwirtschaftsplan zu beheben die Zuschüsse und Unterstützung für Unternehmen, Arbeitnehmer und Selbstständige.

„Mit vier Millionen Arbeitnehmern in Armut vor dem Coronavirus können wir nicht erwarten, dass die Menschen mit einem immer kleineren Teil ihres bestehenden Einkommens über Wasser bleiben, wenn sich ihre Kosten nicht geändert haben.

„Es ist richtig, dass jetzt mehr Unterstützung für Menschen verfügbar sein wird, die in Unternehmen arbeiten, die von einem Nachfrageverlust betroffen sind, anstatt nur Zwangsschließungen, aber das muss ausreichen, damit Arbeiter und ihre Familien das Dach über dem Kopf und das Essen auf dem Tisch halten können durch einen sehr schwierigen Winter. & # 39;

Paul Johnson, Direktor des Institute for Fiscal Studies, twitterte: „Sehr große Änderung des Job Support Scheme. Um die Beschäftigten in Jobs zu halten, müssen Unternehmen jetzt 20 Prozent für ihre Arbeitszeit plus fünf Prozent zusätzlich bezahlen, wobei die Regierung 75 Prozent übernimmt.

'Im Rahmen des im letzten Monat angekündigten Programms deckte die Regierung nur 45 Prozent ab. Dies verändert die Anreize, die Menschen auf Trab zu halten.

"Auch hier ist es sehr seltsam, eine so große Ankündigung ohne Informationen über die erwarteten Kosten zu haben, soweit ich sehen kann."

Jonathan Geldart, Generaldirektor des Institute of Directors, begrüßte das Programm ebenfalls und fügte hinzu: „Das neue und verbesserte Programm zur Unterstützung von Arbeitsplätzen ist zu begrüßen und sollte dazu beitragen, die Ängste der Unternehmensleiter zu zerstreuen.

'Eine erhebliche Reduzierung des Arbeitgeberbeitrags ist ein entscheidender Schritt, der die Bedenken unserer Mitglieder widerspiegelt.

"Ein nationaler Ansatz wird dazu beitragen, die Verwirrung zwischen verschiedenen Tiering-Systemen und politischen Verhandlungen im Hinterzimmer zu beseitigen."

Andere haben jedoch vor der "traurigen Realität" gewarnt, dass Tausende von Unternehmen im Winter wahrscheinlich schließen werden, "unabhängig von den finanziellen Unterstützungspaketen, die die Kanzlerin anbietet".

Aude Barral, Mitbegründer der Entwickler-Rekrutierungsplattform CodinGame, fügte hinzu: „Die Regierung muss erkennen, wie wichtig Umschulung und Umschulung sein werden, damit das Land so schnell wie möglich wieder auf die Beine kommt.

'Der Gastgewerbe-, Tourismus- und Einzelhandelssektor wurde durch die Pandemie dezimiert, aber es gibt Sektoren wie Technologie mit großem Beschäftigungspotential.

"Es müssen deutlich mehr Investitionen in die Umschulung für die Zukunft getätigt werden, um diese Sektoren für Menschen zu öffnen, die über übertragbare Fähigkeiten verfügen und wieder arbeiten möchten."

Andere Geschäftsinhaber waren sich einig, dass die Unterstützung durch die Regierung willkommen ist, bestanden jedoch darauf, dass "dies nicht ausreicht, um uns zu helfen, wenn sie dieselben Einschränkungen beibehalten".

Mark Dogan, 50, der den Gizel-Kebab-Laden in Clapham betreibt, sagte gegenüber MailOnline: „Jeder, der die Pubs vor 22 Uhr verlassen muss, bedeutet, dass wir dann kein Geschäft haben. Das ist nicht genug.

'Und was sind die Details. Zahlen sie jede Woche oder nur jeden Monat? Also ja, ich nehme es an, aber sie tun nicht genug, um zu helfen. & # 39;

Malik Ahmed, Kellner im Restaurant Argan von Clapham Common, kritisierte ebenfalls das neue System, nach dem die Löhne auf 77 Prozent des Normalwerts angehoben werden können.

Er sagte: „Wir leben in London, trotz 100 Prozent unserer Löhne können wir immer noch nicht alle unsere Rechnungen decken.

„Jetzt bekommen wir noch weniger. Wie kann ich mir Miete, Reisen und all diese anderen Kosten leisten?

'Dieses Programm geht davon aus, dass jeder Einsparungen hat, aber viele nicht. We are really struggling at the moment, business is dead because of all the restrictions.

'Look around, its lunch and there's hardly anyone here because customers are staying away. We need the restrictions gone now – we want to work hard and earn our full wages.'

Announcing the latest bailout in the Commons today, Mr Sunak said he had listened to industry leaders and recognised that 'open but struggling businesses require further support'.

'Their message was clear – the impact of the health restrictions on their businesses is worse than they hoped,' he said.

The Chancellor admitted that he could not give any precise figures for the overall bill, saying the schemes were 'demand led'.

But it appears the announcements today mean £13billion more spending by the Government over the next six months – on top of more than £200billion already splurged to prop up the economy.

They will fuel alarm at the spiralling outlay after it emerged the government has borrowed more than a billion pounds every day during the pandemic so far.

Firms forced to close in Tier Three, such as betting shops and soft play centres, will be able to furlough their workers on two-thirds of wages.

But there has been an outcry from hospitality firms in Tier Two, whose business models have been wrecked by restrictions that mean people can no longer meet socially indoors.

Tier Two restrictions now cover many of the most heavily populated parts of the country, including London, Birmingham, York, Essex and the North East.

Under the Jobs Support Scheme (JSS), which officially launches from November 1, staff can have their wages topped up to 77 per cent of normal.

The state and employer each fund 50 per cent of the cost of hours not worked. But critics have warned that the scheme gives too little incentive to firms to retain staff.

But Mr Sunak cut the cost of the employer's contribution, with the state picking up more of the bill.

The Treasury has modelled costings of £1billion per month for every two million people on the scheme.

That would give a £6billion cost over the next six months, although much of that money was already committed.

However, the bill could rise dramatically if more people sign up.

Mr Sunak also increased the amount of profits covered by the forthcoming self-employed grant from 20 per cent to 40 per cent, meaning the maximum grant will increase from £1,875 to £3,750.

That means a 'further' £3.1bn of support to the self-employed between November to January alone, according to the Treasury.

If the next grant covering February to April is kept at the higher rate that would be roughly the same again.

Paul Johnson, director of the Institute for Fiscal Studies, tweeted: 'Very big change to Job Support Scheme. To keep employees in jobs firms now need to pay 20 per cent for time they work plus five per cent on top, with government covering 75 per cent.

'Under scheme announced last month government covered just 45 per cent. This changes incentives to keep people on a lot.

'Again, though, it is very odd to have such a big announcement without, so far as I can see, any information on expected cost.'

Jonathan Geldart, director general of the Institute of Directors, also welcomed the scheme, adding: 'The new and improved jobs support scheme is to be welcomed, and should go some way to easing company directors' fears.

'A substantial reduction in the employer contribution is a crucial step, reflecting our members' concerns.

'Taking a national approach will help to cut through the confusion of different tiering systems and backroom political negotiations.'

However, others have warned the 'sad reality' is that thousands of businesses are likely to close over the winter 'whatever financial support packages the Chancellor offers up.'

Aude Barral, co-founder of developer recruitment platform CodinGame, added: 'The Government needs to recognise how important reskilling and retraining is going to be in helping the country get back on its feet as quickly as possible.

'The hospitality, tourism and retail sectors have been decimated by the pandemic, but there are sectors such as technology that have huge employment potential.

'There needs to be significantly more investment in retraining for the future, opening up these sectors to people who have transferable skills and are keen to get back to work.'

Other business owners agreed that the Government support is welcome, but insisted 'this isn't enough to help us if they still keep in place the same restrictions.'

Mark Dogan, 50, who runs Gizel kebab shop in Clapham, told MailOnline: 'Everyone having to leave pubs before 10pm means we get no business then. This isn't enough.

'And what are the details. Will they pay every week or only each month? So yes, I'll take it, but they're not doing enough to help.'

Malik Ahmed, a waiter at Argan restaurant by Clapham Common, was also critical of the new scheme, under which wages can be topped up to 77 per cent of the normal figure.

He said: 'We live in London, even with 100 percent of our wages we still can't cover all our bills.

'Now we are getting even less, so how am I going to afford rent, travel and all those other costs?

'This programme assumes that everyone has savings, but many don't. We are really struggling at the moment, business is dead because of all the restrictions.

'Look around, its lunch and there's hardly anyone here because customers are staying away. We need the restrictions gone now – we want to work hard and earn our full wages.'

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