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Coronavirus UK: Northern anger at Boris Johnson's tier three lock


SAGE experts met today to demand that Boris Johnson get tougher by imposing a nationwide lockdown on circuit breakers – although the prime minister already has a backlash from the north over plans to close pubs and restaurants in hotspots.

Scientists warn that the coronavirus has a "weapon at the top" of the country and further action must be taken as a health minister suggested that hospitals could be flooded within 10 days unless the government steps up its response.

Part of the north will go deeper into lockdown next week after the prime minister signed a new traffic light system for local curbs for England.

The mechanism for classifying the toughest "red" or "tier three" zones is still unclear, but it is expected to cover Manchester, Liverpool and Newcastle – three cities where infection has continued to rise despite other restrictions.

Hospitality businesses are to be closed as part of the new measures, which are expected to be confirmed on Monday and imposed from Wednesday. However, shops, offices and schools will remain open.

Ministers are still pondering the fate of hairdressers and leisure facilities – but Chancellor Rishi Sunak will propose a special vacation-style compensation system for workers and companies hit by the curb.

Conservative MPs and local leaders in the north have expressed anger at the government's stance. Former minister Jake Berry accused the prime minister of being "London-centered" and enjoying "a little too much" his comprehensive emergency powers. Politicians in Manchester, Liverpool, Newcastle and Sheffield raged over "dictations announced without notice", saying ministers treated the north like a "petri dish to experiment with" while the south left frivolously.

But Health Minister Nadine Dorries warned those who told the government not to impose further restrictions that otherwise hospital admissions would be "at a critical stage" in 10 days.

Mr Johnson is also facing massive pressure from scientists to go further and impose a "breaker" lockdown similar to the one Nicola Sturgeon dramatically announced yesterday. Pubs and restaurants in Scotland are prohibited from serving alcohol indoors for 16 days from tomorrow and they must close until 6pm. In large areas north of the border, restaurants are advised to close completely.

The government's SAGE group met with a member, Professor John Edmunds, earlier this afternoon, and previously said a brief, sharp shock was needed to "prevent the epidemic from getting out of hand in the next few weeks or months and the healthcare system from getting out of hand." Overwhelmed".

“We are not far from that. I hate to be gloomy, but in the north of England we are not far from the health system becoming overburdened, ”he said in a webinar for the Royal Society of Medicine.

Prof. Edmunds denied that scientists would "put a gun to the Prime Minister's head". "It's the virus that puts a gun to the prime minister's head," he said.

There was a slight relief for Mr Johnson this afternoon when Keir Starmer withdrew a confrontation over the blanket curfew for pubs at 10 p.m. – which critics say makes matters worse – to get the plans through Parliament. The Labor leader said his MPs would not oppose the move in a crunch vote next week, despite wanting a policy review.

When the coronavirus crisis escalated again today:

  • The Chairman of Nottingham City Council has sounded the alarm over the delay in announcing tighter restrictions to control an increase in the area until the traffic light system is announced on Monday. Labor's David Mellen said he feared people would have a "blow-out" weekend pending action;
  • Nicola Sturgeon has been accused of sentencing thousands of businesses to "death" by imposing draconian pubs and restaurants closings in Scotland.
  • Housing Secretary Robert Jenrick declined to cite scientific evidence of the 10pm pubs curfew, simply saying it was "nonsensical".
  • Hinting that the government could soon require workers to wear masks in offices, Mr Jenrick said the idea had "advantages" and was being considered by chief medical officer Chris Whitty.
  • A leading scientist has sounded the alarm because speculation could lead to people becoming infected with coronavirus again. This could mean that the problem is "forever".

Boris Johnson (pictured today on Downing Street) will ignore critics and place Tier 3 restrictions in Covid-hit areas of the north - the highest level of a new alarm system

Boris Johnson (pictured today on Downing Street) will ignore critics and place Tier 3 restrictions in Covid-affected areas of the north – the highest level of a new alarm system

The Scottish Government figures suggest that hospitality over the past week has led to infections

The Scottish Government figures suggest that hospitality over the past week has led to infections

For the first time since March, the UK has more coronavirus cases relative to population than the US, data shows. On October 5, there were 143 cases per million people, compared to 130 per million in America

For the first time since March, the UK has more coronavirus cases relative to population than the US, data shows. On October 5, there were 143 cases per million people, compared to 130 per million in America

Two-thirds of the public would support the Scottish-style lockdown of circuit breakers across the country

An exclusive survey for MailOnline by Redfield & Wilton Strategies has found strong support for a nationwide "brief sharp shock" of tough restrictions across the country to break transmission chains

An exclusive survey for MailOnline by Redfield & Wilton Strategies has found strong support for a nationwide "brief sharp shock" of tough restrictions across the country to break transmission chains

Almost two-thirds of the public would support a Scottish-style shutdown if Boris Johnson prepares to close pubs and restaurants in the north.

An exclusive survey for MailOnline has found strong support for a "brief sharp shock" of harsh restrictions across the country to break transmission chains.

Redfield & Wilton Strategies' research also uncovered widespread confusion and dissatisfaction with the currently complex local curbs.

Around a third of the birtons aren't sure they know the rules in their area, while half admit they didn't fully follow them.

Cabinet departments delayed the introduction of the new three-tier system, with the overhaul originally intended to be introduced today.

Chancellor Rishi Sunak and other "hawks" were alarmed at the economic impact that clashed with "pigeons" Matt Hancock and Michael Gove over elements of the plan.

Mr Sunak and Economy Minister Alok Sharma urged more clarity on the triggers for the lockdown, arguing that more restrictions on social distancing should not be applied consistently across regions.

On the other hand, Mr. Hancock and Mr. Gove argued that allowing little flexibility would undermine efforts to clarify the public health message.

A meeting on Monday was broken off without an agreement – but the Prime Minister signed the new traffic light regulations yesterday evening along with a compensation package.

It is expected to be officially unveiled on Monday and will take effect from Wednesday.

Housing Secretary Robert Jenrick this morning almost confirmed that action was imminent in pubs and restaurants.

"It is correct to say that the number of cases is rising rapidly in the northwest and northeast, as well as in a number of cities, particularly in the Midlands like Nottingham, and this is a serious situation," he said.

& # 39; We are currently considering what steps to take, apparently under the advice of our scientific and medical advisors, and a decision will be made shortly.

"But I can't tell you exactly what's going to happen right now."

When asked if there will be an announcement related to the hospitality industry next week, Jenrick said, “We're looking into the evidence. In some parts of the country the number of cases is increasing very quickly and we take this very seriously.

"If we have to take further steps, we will of course take very seriously how we can help and support these individual companies."

The Chancellor is believed to have been given the right to be consulted before any hospitality company closes because of the impact on public spending.

A source told The Times: “There has been discomfort with how decisions are made. It's opaque. Rishi pushed for clearer lines. & # 39;

The level of anger among Tories – and especially the "Red Wall" MPs of former Labor seats who gave Mr Johnson an impressive majority in December – was evident last night as the Commons debated local restrictions.

Rossendale and Darwen MP Jake Berry, who was Minister for Northern Powerhouse under Theresa May, said: "I think the government has fallen into the dire trap of making national decisions based on a London-centered view with London data . "

Red wall rages at PMs lockdown in the north

The level of anger among Tories – and especially the former Labor Red Wall MPs who gave Mr Johnson an impressive majority in December – was evident last night as the Commons debated local restrictions.

Rossendale and Darwen MP Jake Berry, who was Minister for Northern Powerhouse under Theresa May, said: "I think the government has fallen into the dire trap of making national decisions based on a London-centered view with London data . "

He raised concerns about the freedoms and freedoms, adding, "Day in and day out, we see these freedoms and freedoms being returned to the government on behalf of Covid.

"I'm afraid this has to stop because as soon as we give them up, they won't come back to us, the government won't give them back to us."

He added, “The worst thing about society is that the government is enjoying these new powers a little too much.

"Cops punishing people for being in their front yards, a bizarre prohibition against sunbathing in public places."

Conservative MP for Crewe and Nant, Dr. Kieran Mullan, urged the government to "work harder" to prove that its policies are evidence-based and effective.

Dehenna Davison, who took Bishop Auckland constituency into Tory's hands for the first time in history, highlighted the difficulties for a landlord who made his premises Covid-proof but saw his income drop dramatically.

Ms. Davison said, “Last weekend he told me that instead of his usual Saturday income of £ 5,000 to £ 6,000, he was only taking in £ 128 all day – not even enough to cover his entire payroll bill.

"Between the 10am curfew and the lack of households able to meet, I'm really concerned that without additional financial support, these restrictions could have the overall effect of keeping pubs closed not just because of the lockdown, but forever shut down."

He raised concerns about the freedoms and freedoms, adding, “Day in and day out, we see these freedoms and freedoms being returned to the government on behalf of Covid.

"I'm afraid this has to stop because as soon as we give them up, they won't come back to us, the government won't give them back to us."

He added, “The worst thing about society is that the government is enjoying these new powers a little too much.

"Cops punishing people for being in their front yards, a bizarre prohibition against sunbathing in public places."

Conservative MP for Crewe and Nant, Dr. Kieran Mullan, urged the government to "work harder" to prove that its policies are evidence-based and effective.

Dehenna Davison, who took Bishop Auckland constituency into Tory's hands for the first time in history, highlighted the difficulties for a landlord who made his premises Covid-proof but saw his income drop dramatically.

Ms. Davison said, “Last weekend he told me that instead of his usual Saturday income of £ 5,000 to £ 6,000, he was only taking in £ 128 all day – not even enough to cover his entire payroll bill.

"Between the 10am curfew and the lack of households able to meet, I'm really concerned that without additional financial support, these restrictions could have the overall effect of keeping pubs closed not just because of the lockdown, but forever shut down."

Liverpool Labor Mayor Steve Rotheram told ITV's GMB program: “We have seen action between North and South increasing.

"Quite simply, the north shouldn't be a petri dish for central government experiments."

Manchester Mayor Andy Burnham said: “No discussion. No advice.

& # 39; Millions of lives affected by Whitehall's dictation. It is proving impossible to deal with this government. & # 39;

But Health Minister Nadine Dorries gave a brief overview of the complaints. When she went on Twitter, she claimed the UK was only 10 days away from a "critical phase".

"Those who now claim that no further action is needed will argue that we haven't done enough in about ten days, when hospital admissions are at a critical stage." We have to do everything possible to prevent our intensive care units from being overwhelmed #NHS # COVID19, "she wrote.

Leaked documents received by the Nottingham Post indicate that the city and surrounding areas should be added to Tier 2 restrictions.

They are sent to high-ranking figures in the city and in the county and make it clear that households cannot mix indoors.

"We currently expect the approach to be announced on Monday, October 12th, and the new standardized rules to take effect on Wednesday, October 14th," the document said.

It was also suggested that Tier 3 restrictions may not have been fully sealed.

"The steps 1 and 2 measures have now been signed by the Covid O committee, but further work is being carried out on step 3," the letter said.

Meanwhile, the backlash against Ms. Sturgeon's move to Scotland has gained momentum.

UKHospitality Executive Director for Scotland, Willie Macleod, warned today that many companies will not survive the new hospitality and licensed trade restrictions north of the border, saying tens of thousands of jobs would be lost.

And Kate Nicholls, the Association's CEO in England, urged the government to consider "more substantial support".

She told BBC Radio 4: “In Scotland £ 40million among 16,000 licensed premises is just over £ 2,000 for these people. It barely keeps the light on, let alone saves a job. & # 39;

Despite the drastic measures on the table, Mr Johnson faces a desperate battle to prevent MPs from rejecting the existing 10pm curfew rules across England.

Up to 100 Tory MPs are threatening to vote against the measure as the government postponed the showdown from this week.

The prospect of a government defeat drew nearer yesterday when union leader Keir Starmer called for more evidence of the effectiveness of the curfew, suggesting his party might oppose it.

Jenrick was asked for evidence to back up the policy this morning and told BBC Radio 4's Today program that it was "common sense".

& # 39; There is evidence that it does play a role. It is well known that if a virus is transmitted through human contact, the longer you spend with people indoors, in a pub, or in a restaurant, the greater the likelihood that we will spread the virus. & # 39;

When asked if the government would release scientific evidence of the spread of Covid-19 in the hospitality industry, the housing secretary said, “It is common knowledge that the longer you stay in pubs and restaurants, the more likely you are to hang out with others individuals come into contact.

“The more drinks people have, the more likely some people are breaking the rules.

& # 39; There is evidence led by the Chief Medical Officer and the Chief Scientific Officer.

"I think it is right that we act decisively instead of waiting for the most detailed epidemiological evidence."

To add to the mix of messages, Mr Johnson is angry with the city guides in Liverpool, Manchester and Newcastle, as well as Leeds, who wrote to the Prime Minister yesterday asking him not to take tougher action.

However, the pressure to do so increased significantly yesterday when Mrs Sturgeon announced a similar two-week restriction in Scotland. Health Secretary Matt Hancock also hinted that England could follow Scotland's lead by imposing stricter restrictions and pub closings in Covid-affected cities.

However, former Cabinet Secretary Sir Iain Duncan Smith warned Mr Johnson that if he copied Ms. Sturgeon's lockdown plans, there would be a major Tory rebellion.

He told the Sun, “There is no evidence that this works – absolutely none.

“There is evidence that this will cripple the economy and lead to more deaths, as non-Covid questions suggest. It's time to strike a balance and save our economy. & # 39;

Dr. Helen Stokes-Lampard, chair of the Academy of Medical Royal Colleges, which represents the 24 Medical Royal Colleges in the UK and Ireland, said people must adhere to strict restrictions or the NHS "may not be able to handle".

She told BBC Breakfast: "Given the recent dramatic increase in both the number of cases and hospital admissions, it is clear that we could soon be back where we were in April if we are not all extremely careful."

In another warning, she revealed that the The number of people hospitalized with Covid-19 in the past month has increased from a few hundred people a day to thousands.

She said: “Right now we have over 3,100 people hospitalized with coronavirus across the UK. In fact, 500 of them are in Intensive Therapy Unit (ITU) beds, which is really worrying.

"A month ago we only had 60 people in ITU beds across the UK, so we are seeing a very worrying trend right now."

Ms. Sturgeon announced the new measures yesterday when she warned that cases have increased among the older generation due to her ban Pubs and restaurants will serve alcohol in Scotland for at least 16 days starting Friday.

The First Minister told Holyrood MSPs the situation was "better than March" but admitted she needed to take a "step backwards" when she unveiled a dramatic "breaker" pressure that began with mid-school hours north of the Border coincided.

In addition to a ban on alcohol consumption, restaurants are only allowed to be open from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m., as Ms. Sturgeon said, without taking action, the virus could "get out of control by the end of this month".

In five “hotspot” areas in the central belt of Scotland, which include Edinburgh and Glasgow and which are home to around 70 percent of the population, pubs will be closed except for takeaways and people will be cut off from using public transport until October 26th advised against.

Mr Hancock appeared to pave the way for similar local crackdown on pubs in England when he said that "outside of your household and inter-household socializing, unfortunately, the highest place for the likelihood of likely transmission, measured by people's contacts, is the." Hospitality is ".

A targeted shutdown of eateries in hotspot areas, however, appears more likely than a nationwide approach, as Downing Street continues to stick to its strategy of local locking in specific areas where the virus has emerged.

Ms Sturgeon imposed some of the toughest restrictions in Europe, saying that if it was a "purely one-dimensional decision" to fight the disease, there would be tougher action, but she was considering the general economy and wellbeing.

But it sparked cries of protest from the hotel industry, which called the crackdown a "total catastrophe" and warned that a business swarm would perish forever.

Government data shows that coronavirus cases among the older generation have recently increased in England

Government data shows that coronavirus cases among the older generation have recently increased in England

The extraordinary move – which Ms. Sturgeon said would come with new £ 40million compensation for affected companies – came when Scotland reported more than 1,000 new infections in one day.

In another drastic step that could prevent politics in England, the national exams in Scotland will also be canceled for the next year and replaced by teacher assessments. Education Secretary Gavin Williamson is currently expected to postpone exam season south of the border by just three weeks.

Ms. Sturgeon's announcement has put pressure on Mr Johnson, who was confronted yesterday with damn numbers showing local restrictions in England are not containing the cases. Ministers and advisers in war consider what to do next.

At a stormy PMQ meeting, Mr Johnson stressed that the effects of the spike were being felt worst in the north, showing that the mix of tough local bans and national restrictions like the 6pm and 10pm pubs curfew was the right one .

Support for "differentiated" action in England shows that the Prime Minister is still resisting demands from scholars for comprehensive action – an obvious boost for Cabinet Ministers alarmed by the threat to millions of jobs and civil liberties.

But union leader Keir Starmer launched a furious attack on Mr Johnson in the House of Commons, saying 19 out of 20 areas exposed to local curbs in the past two months had actually seen an increase in infections. He insisted that the measures "do not work" and highlighted the controversial curfew at 10 pm for pubs, according to which the government had not provided a "scientific basis".

Under the new system, Tier One will be the basic restriction as it now applies across the UK, including the rule of six and the hospitality curfew at 10pm.

Tier 2 measures would be stricter measures, roughly in line with current restrictions in cities under local closure, and will be imposed when Tier 1 measures do not work or when an area has seen a significant increase.

Although not yet finalized, Tier 3 will include the complete closure of pubs and pubs Restaurants and strict rules for social interaction – although schools and places of worship should remain open.

Tier 3 restrictions would come with expanded financial aid packages – and possibly a local vacation program if bars and restaurants had to close.

Tensions between ministers were underscored yesterday when Mr Hancock told executives that hospitalization rates have increased "very sharply" and that the government has a "very serious problem".

But Trade Secretary Liz Truss suggested in a round of interviews that the current balance of restrictions is "right".

Ms. Sturgeon said indoor hospitality venues can only be open between 6 a.m. and 6 p.m. daily and can only sell food and soft drinks.

Bars, restaurants and outdoor cafes are allowed to stay open until 10 p.m. and sell alcohol until then.

The restrictions will go into effect on Friday at 6:00 p.m. and are expected to end after October 25th.

Stör calls time: Scotland's new Covid regulations in full

  • All pubs, restaurants and cafes are not allowed to sell alcohol in the house for 16 days.
  • They also face a curfew that forces them to close at 6 p.m. every night.
  • Bars, restaurants and outdoor cafes are allowed to stay open until 10 p.m. and sell alcohol until then.
  • There will be additional restrictions on opening in five areas of Scotland's central belt – including Edinburgh and Glasgow.
  • Pubs, restaurants and licensed cafes in the "hotspots" of Greater Glasgow & Clyde, Lanarkshire, Ayrshire & Arran, Lothian and Forth Valley will be forced to close all but takeaway customers.
  • The measures will take effect on Friday at 4 p.m. for 16 days until October 25th.
  • The residents of these areas were also urged to avoid public transport unless it was absolutely necessary for the next two weeks. You should only use it to get to work, school, or other inevitable travel.
  • Live outdoor events will be banned in the five areas for the next two weeks.
  • Snooker and billiard halls, bowling alleys, casinos and bingo halls will be closed in these areas for two weeks from October 10th.
  • Contact sports and indoor group exercises for people aged 18 and over will be suspended for the same period.
  • Face covering is mandatory indoors.
  • Companies affected by the new restrictions will receive an additional £ 40 million in funding.

However, all licensed premises in the Greater Glasgow and Clyde, Lanarkshire, Ayrshire and Arran, Lothian and Forth Valley areas are closed to both indoor and outdoor use.

Cafes without a license to sell alcohol are allowed to be open until 6 p.m., the Prime Minister said to counteract social isolation.

People in the central belt of Scotland have been asked to avoid public transport unless it is strictly necessary for the next two weeks.

While no travel restrictions are placed on people in these five areas, Ms. Sturgeon urged those living in these areas not to travel beyond their own health authorities.

Ms. Sturgeon insisted that her "firm intention" was for the crackdown to end after two weeks.

"It is our firm intention that these measures will stop after two weeks … but it is obvious that we will dampen the virus by then."

She said, “Let me be clear. We will not go into lockdown again today.

“We are not closing schools, colleges or universities.

& # 39; We're not stopping the NHS remobilizing for non-Covid care. And we don't ask people to stay home.

“The actions I am announcing today will feel like a step backwards, but they are in the interests of protecting our progress as a whole.

"By taking the tough but necessary measures now, we hope that we can avoid even tougher measures in the future."

The Scottish Government's model released yesterday suggested that the daily number of coronavirus cases could reach 35,000 by Christmas without "further intervention".

The number of daily cases has risen from under 300 two weeks ago – when a ban on indoor mixing was put in place – and reported 1,054 cases yesterday.

On bruising Sir Keir in the House of Commons, Mr Johnson appeared to rule out the possibility of an impending national clash.

"Although cases in the country have increased significantly this week across the country from last week, 7-day statistics show that there are now 497 cases per 100,000 in Liverpool, 522 cases per 100,000 in Manchester and 422 in Newcastle" , he said .

"The key point is that the local regional approach combined with the national approach remains correct, as two-thirds of those hospitalized on Sunday were in the North West, North East and Yorkshire."

But Sir Keir sparked a rant, pointing out that the government's local lockdown is clearly "not working".

& # 39; On nursing homes, protective gear, exams, tests. The prime minister ignores the warning signs, speeds towards a car accident, then looks in the rearview mirror and says, "What's this about?" he said.

"In retrospect, it's literally a government."

Sir Keir added, "All the Prime Minister has to say is that it is too early to say if restrictions are working, but it is obvious that something has gone wrong here. What is the Prime Minister going to do about it?" "

The Labor leader pointed out that there were currently 62 cases per 100,000 in Mr Johnson's local authority, Hillingdon, with no local restrictions.

'But restrictions were imposed in 20 local areas across England when infection rates were much lower. In Kirklees it was only 29 per 100,000, ”he said.

“The local communities, Prime Ministers, really don't understand these differences. Can he please explain it to you? & # 39;

Mr Johnson replied, “I wish I could pretend everything was going to be rosy in the Midlands or in London, which is unfortunately also where infections are increasing.

"So we need a concerted national effort, we need to follow the directions, we need hands, face, space, a test if you have symptoms and follow the rule of six."

Sir Keir insisted that he support the government's rule of six.

But he took on a completely different tone as to whether Labor would support the 10 p.m. bar and restaurant curfew in England, which does more harm than good to critics as night owls only take to the streets.

"The Prime Minister cannot explain why an area is restricted, he cannot explain what the various restrictions are, he cannot explain how restrictions end – it is getting ridiculous," said Sir Keir.

The great lockdown divide? Covid is rising in the university and factory towns of the north, which have more generational households, cooler temperatures and "got out of lockdown too early".

Experts today attributed the rapidly growing coronavirus cases and hospital admissions in the north of England to a number of factors unique to the region that have made the virus vulnerable to a surge.

The region faces tighter lockdown restrictions as the government tries to balance fears of spikes in infections and hospital stays with a growing Tory revolt over the devastation of the economy.

But the leaders of the northern cities including Manchester, Liverpool, Leeds and Newcastle have written to Boris Johnson asking him not to climb the coronavirus curbs again while sparing the south, where the virus is relatively under control.

Around 70 percent of new admissions to hospitals are in the north, and 43 of the 49 areas with local lockdown rules are in the Northwest, Northeast, or Yorkshire and Humber.

Experts told MailOnline the problem was complex and there could be no clear cause of the disaster in the region, but theories included:

  • More "residual infections" after first lockdown: Data suggests there may have been more cases of Covid-19 floating around the north in July after lockdown rules were lifted in spring, meaning the region is experiencing the second wave started from a higher baseline and worryingly hit numbers faster;
  • Disadvantaged residents who are more exposed to the virus: People who have low-paying jobs in factories, pubs and shops, for example, cannot work from home, which puts them at risk if they leave the house every day while they are less well off Families who live in large, multi-generational households mean that anyone with the disease can spread it further.
  • Large student populations spread with active social lives: University students may accelerate the spread of burgeoning outbreaks by socializing more. This means that the virus is circulating at higher levels and is more likely to get to the vulnerable corners of society.
  • Cooler weather is changing people's behavior: data shows that in summer and early autumn average temperatures were lower and rainfall was higher in the north of England than in the south. It is “reasonable” to assume that people have driven indoors where the virus is more likely to spread.

Nicola Sturgeon today banned pubs and restaurants from serving alcohol in Scotland for at least 16 days from Friday. The announced venues will be put on a 6 p.m. curfew, adding pressure on Boris Johnson to follow suit in order to control the growing outbreak.

The first Scottish minister told the MSPs in Holyrood that the situation was "better than March" but admitted she needed to take a "step backwards" when she unveiled a dramatic "breaker" pressure that marks mid-school north the border coincided.

Of the 14,542 new positive tests announced yesterday, 4,441 were in the north-west of the country (31 percent), a further 3,670 in the north-east and Yorkshire and the Humber (25 percent). For comparison, there were 401 in the southwest and 492 in the east of England

Of the 14,542 new positive tests announced yesterday, 4,441 were in the north-west of the country (31 percent), and 3,670 in the north-east and Yorkshire and the Humber (25 percent). For comparison, there were 401 in the southwest and 492 in the east of England

Positive tests and the number of people hospitalized with the disease are skyrocketing, especially in urban areas around Manchester, Liverpool and Newcastle, and pressure on the government to take tougher measures is growing as local lockdowns increase Virus not stopped yet.

A lockdown to the region should now be "seriously considered," a disease expert warned, but including all of England by the same rules would likely be "excessive" as data in the south do not warrant the same measures.

However, a partial block would be unlikely. It would be "an extra level of injustice" for people who are already suffering the most financially if they cannot work as usual, said one scientist, while another added that there would be "a lot of grievance" if the rules were rejected ends of M1 would be very different.

However, leaked documents from the Manchester Evening News have predicted that if the city does not change direction, hospital admissions in Greater Manchester could be at the same level as in April before the end of October.

Many politicians and business leaders are strongly against another full lockdown like the one in March, as it would have devastating financial consequences and could worsen the physical and mental health of millions of people.

Although the economy is more dependent on London than the cities in the north, a regional lockdown may be less damaging than a national one, which might be needed later if the virus wasn't controlled, although local businesses could suffer badly.

Local restrictions have popped up in the upper half of England for months but don't seem to be slowing the spread of the disease. More people become infected with every week it takes to tighten the rules.

On Sunday, the number of people admitted to hospital in England with Covid-19 rose 25 percent in one day to its highest level since early June. 478 new patients, including 334 (70 percent) in the North West and North East & Yorkshire.

Und von den gestern angekündigten 14.542 neuen positiven Tests befanden sich 4.441 im Nordwesten des Landes (31 Prozent), weitere 3.670 im Nordosten und in Yorkshire und Humber (25 Prozent). Zum Vergleich: Es gab 401 im Südwesten und 492 im Osten Englands.

Dr. Simon Clarke, Mikrobiologe an der University of Reading, sagte, dass eine Sperrung für den Norden immer wahrscheinlicher wird.

"Ich denke, im Nordwesten werden sich die Beschränkungen sicherlich verschärfen", sagte er heute gegenüber MailOnline. „Ich denke, wir kommen an einen Punkt, an dem wir ernsthaft über eine regionale Sperrung nachdenken müssen – nicht im ganzen Land. das wäre übertrieben. & # 39;

Dr. Clarke erklärte, dass die Rückkehr von Studenten in Gebiete im Norden – es gibt allein im Nordosten mindestens 60.000 Studenten sowie mehrere Universitäten in Liverpool und Manchester – die Fälle in die Höhe treiben könnte: „Merseyside und Greater Manchester, zum Beispiel sind dicht besiedelt.

'Sie haben relativ große Studentenpopulationen; Wir wissen, dass es an der Manchester Uni und, glaube ich, in Liverpool ein Problem gibt. Selbst wenn Schüler als Altersgruppe im Allgemeinen nicht sehr krank sind, können sie (das Virus) auf den Rest der Gemeinden übertragen.

'Diese Städte (Liverpool und Manchester) haben auch große Nachtwirtschaften. Das ist der Gedanke hinter der Ausgangssperre um 22 Uhr, wer möchte zwei Meter messen, wenn Sie mit Ihren Freunden in die Kneipe gehen? Du vergisst (über soziale Distanzierung), wenn du redest und Kontakte knüpfst. & # 39;

Aber, sagte er, die Studenten sind nicht ganz schuld und fügten hinzu: „Es liegt weitgehend außerhalb der Kontrolle der Menschen, aber Studenten und junge Leute bekommen viel Schuld. Es gibt Hinweise auf Regelverstöße, aber keine Hinweise darauf, dass es umfangreich genug ist, um zunehmende Infektionen zu verursachen. & # 39;

Mehr als 80 Universitäten in Großbritannien haben mindestens 5.000 bestätigte Fälle von Covid-19 bei Studenten und Mitarbeitern gemeldet.

Die Manchester University, an der seit dem 21. September mehr als 1.000 Fälle aufgetreten sind, und die Manchester Metropolitan University haben sich heute dem virtuellen Lernen zugewandt.

Die Universität von Sheffield, an der seit Beginn des Semesters mehr als 500 Studenten und Mitarbeiter positiv getestet wurden, wird ab Freitag auch Online-Vorlesungen anbieten.

Und es kommt, als mehr als 300 Studenten und acht Mitarbeiter der Universität von Birmingham positiv auf Covid getestet haben, wurde heute bekannt gegeben. Mehr als 300 Studenten und acht Mitarbeiter wurden zwischen dem 30. September und dem 6. Oktober ebenfalls positiv auf das Virus getestet.

Nach der Entdeckung, dass fast 16.000 "versäumte" Fälle zum System hinzugefügt wurden, stiegen die Infektionsraten in allen Behörden des Landes mit Ausnahme von vier am Wochenende - alle nicht betroffenen Personen befanden sich im Süden. Most of the cases were added in the northwest of the country, with other areas in the northeast and the Midlands also being severely affected

Nach der Entdeckung, dass fast 16.000 "versäumte" Fälle in das System aufgenommen wurden, stiegen die Infektionsraten in allen Behörden des Landes mit Ausnahme von vier am Wochenende – alle nicht betroffenen Personen befanden sich im Süden. Most of the cases were added in the northwest of the country, with other areas in the northeast and the Midlands also being severely affected

Es gab auch große Ausbrüche an Universitäten in Liverpool, Salford, Newcastle und Northumbria, Leicester, Nottingham, Oxford und Kent sowie in Swansea, Stirling, Glasgow und Belfast.

Während Studenten möglicherweise das Feuer lokaler Ausbrüche schüren, sind die normalerweise ansässigen Bevölkerungsgruppen laut Wissenschaftlern aufgrund ihrer Lebensbedingungen auch einem höheren Risiko lokaler Ausbrüche ausgesetzt.

Dr. Gabriel Scally, Arzt und Professor für öffentliche Gesundheit an der Universität von Bristol, sagte, dass schlecht bezahlte Jobs und beengte Wohnverhältnisse ein höheres Risiko für die Übertragung und den Virus des Menschen bedeuten.

Er erklärte, dass Gebiete mit niedrigerem Einkommen wiederholt am stärksten vom Coronavirus betroffen seien und dass der Norden einige der am wenigsten wohlhabenden Gebiete des Landes habe.

Ein Bericht des Wohnungsministeriums vom letzten Jahr ergab, dass 19 von 20 der am stärksten benachteiligten Gemeindegebiete in England im Norden liegen, wobei fast die Hälfte der Stadtteile in Middlesbrough als „stark benachteiligt“ eingestuft wird.

Eight of the 10 most deprived neighbourhoods in the country were all in Blackpool, the i newspaper reported, and Liverpool, Hull, Manchester and Knowsley in Merseyside were also home to some of the most deprived people in the country.

Dr Scally, who is a member of the Independent SAGE group of scientists, said: 'There are three key factors: the level of deprivation, secondly the level of over-crowding of domestic dwellings and, thirdly the proportion of people from BAME (black, Asian and minority ethnic) backgrounds.

'Deprivation is linked to not-very-good housing and along with that goes, often, multi-generational households where small children live in the same houses as their grandparents. We know that BAME communities are much more likely to be poor and marginalised. It seems to be the coalition of all three factors together that have led to the virus becoming endemic.'

He added that people are more likely to do poorly-paid jobs and those that cannot be done from home, which makes them less likely to get tested or to self-isolate if they're advised to do so, because they need the money.

Because of these problems, only a functioning test and trace system which can root out cases and their sources will work as a long-term solution, Dr Scally said. Ideally, such a system would be run by local councils who know the areas they work in, rather than call handlers employed by the central Government.

'If we continue the way we're going with no functioning test and trace system and a growth in numbers, I think it (a northern lockdown) is likely,' he told MailOnline.

'Will it work? To a certain extent but we now know that at the end of the last lockdown there were several local authorities in Greater Manchester, for example, that had endemic infections going on. It didn't solve the problem the first time so why do we think it will the second time?'

HOSPITALISATIONS AT 6% OF PEAK LEVELS IN THE SOUTH BUT 30% IN THE NORTH

The number of people hospitalized with Covid-19 has decreased in much of England as data suggests the country is panicking from a runaway outbreak in the north.

In London, the Southeast and the Southwest – where roughly half of the country's 55 million people live – daily admissions appear to be rising after rising from a summer low in September, in line with cases.

However, approvals in the North West, North East and Yorkshire are still on the rise, where new local bans occur every week and positive tests result in record numbers. But with talk of a second national lockdown growing in winter, the numbers suggest that the south walls are being grouped according to rules they don't need.

In the Midlands and East of England the picture is more complex – in the Midlands hospital stays increased dramatically in September, but there are signs that they have now peaked while admissions in the East still seem to be slowly rising when also at a significantly lower level than in the northern regions.

Hospital inmates in the worst hit areas have reached almost a third of what they had during the height of the crisis in April, while in the south of the country they are still much lower at around six percent.

In the northwest, an average of 107 people are currently hospitalized with coronavirus every day, and 94 per day in the northeast. Both numbers are their highest since May and show no signs of slowing. For comparison, the peak values ​​for each region were around 2,900 and 2,600 per day, respectively.

On the other hand, in London, where officials are reportedly discussing tougher measures, there are just 34 shots a day – up from an average of 39 on September 25 and just 4.5 percent of the level recorded at the height of the crisis in April was. And in the southwest, which was least affected during the pandemic, only eight people are hospitalized every day – six percent of the maximum.

If there was a lockdown specifically affecting the North, Reading's Dr Clarke said, there would be 'an awful lot of complaining'.

'It's quite clear that local authorities want greater powers to be able to react quickly, he added. 'Speed is of the essence… (Enforcing new rules) is where the Government in London can use these local politicians. They're all on board and it's incumbent on them to justify the restrictions.'

Another reason that the North is being hardest hit this time around could be that it had more 'residual' cases left over when the first lockdown ended.

Dr Andy Preston, a biologist at the University of Bath, told MailOnline the regions may have started the second wave from a higher baseline, meaning they hit worrying numbers of cases quicker than other places.

'It looks as if possibly there were still residual greater levels of infection in those areas – the trough, as it were,' he said.

'I think the lockdown did suppress the virus pretty well; it's clear that it did. But it's clear that it didn't eradicate it and, once we started to ease restrictions, the growth started.

'You tend to see a lag. It's still an exponential increase but you remain at relatively low numbers for a while. The rate of increase is probably reasonably similar nationally but we're not reaching the threshold at the same time. It may be that it's a matter of time and if we continue the South West will (reach the same level).'

Data from the Covid Symptom Study, run by King's College London, suggests that there were an estimated 401 people catching Covid-19 every day in the North East & Yorkshire in the week up to July 16, and 321 per day in the North West.

This measure, taken around a week after 'Super Saturday' on July 4 when the last lockdown rules were lifted and pubs and restaurants reopened, shows that estimated cases then were higher than in any other region.

The second worst area was the Midlands, where there were an estimated 363 cases per day, but this dropped in the following week while the cases in the North continued to rise to higher than 430 in each area.

Dr Preston added that case rates may be especially high in areas that have large populations of people who are likely to get tested for the disease because they get symptoms.

Older people, those in poor health and people from non-white backgrounds all face a higher risk of severe illness with Covid-19 and are therefore more likely to get symptoms which would lead them to get a test.

Therefore, areas with large elderly populations and BAME groups are likely to see more people testing positive, whereas areas with younger, whiter communities might be less likely to get properly sick and to get swabbed. Tests are currently only available for people who develop a cough or fever or lose their sense of smell or taste.

'If you have large proportions of populations that tend to be more symptomatic you're likely to get more positive tests,' he added.

Department of Health data shows that the numbers of people in hospital in the North of England has hit around a third of the level it was at during the epidemic's peak in April. Meanwhile, admissions are surging in those regions while the rate of increase is much slower in most other areas (illustrated in the graphs)

Department of Health data shows that the numbers of people in hospital in the North of England has hit around a third of the level it was at during the epidemic's peak in April. Meanwhile, admissions are surging in those regions while the rate of increase is much slower in most other areas (illustrated in the graphs)

There have also been suggestions that the colder weather in the north of England could be affecting how the virus spreads by driving people indoors and depriving them of vitamin D.

Data shows a link between the weather and current Covid-19 outbreaks, with Manchester – the heart of spiralling cases in August – enduring twice as much rainfall as London, where cases barely ticked up as summer drew to a close.

Fast-forward to the end of September and the North West was recording twice as many infections as the next worst-hit region (1,595 cases in the week ending September 23), and was where all 10 of the worst cases-per-person hotspots were located.

Scientists admit it is 'entirely reasonable' to blame the weather because colder temperatures drive people indoors – and could also cut their time in sunlight and, hence, Vitamin D levels, which research says can protect them from the virus. People spending time close to one another is considered the biggest driver of Covid-19 transmission, where ventilation is poor and strangers touch the same surfaces regularly.

Studies have also suggested the coronavirus is less equipped to survive on surfaces outside in sunlight because the UV rays damage its genetic material, potentially meaning people are less likely to be infected.

The warm weather — which saw record-high temperatures of 37.8C in July and a heatwave — is one of the reasons why scientists think Britain was able to drive the virus down this summer, alongside the tough social distancing rules and the lasting effects of the lockdown.

But other scientists have warned it would be tricky to ever prove the regional differences in weather would be to blame, insisting it could actually be down to lower levels of population immunity or higher rates of deprivation in the North. One even simply suggested bad luck may have played a role.

Met Office data for August shows that the South saw the highest temperatures, longest hours of sunshine, and least rainfall in August.

It saw average temperatures at a warm 18.2C (64F), while in the North of England they hovered at 15.9C (60F) and in Scotland they plunged to 13.5C (56.3F).

The South also had at least 30mm less rainfall than the other regions, clocking 97.5mm, compared to 116.1mm in Scotland and 131.9mm in the North.

And on sunshine, Southerners saw an extra 40 hours of rays than Scotland throughout the month, and 20 hours more than the North of England.

The city of Manchester endured around 131.9mm of rain in August. It saw its coronavirus infection rate tick up to 40 cases per 100,000 every week by the end of August, up from 22 at the end of July.

The weather was similar in Bolton, which later became the epicentre of the UK's outbreak. At the start of August the town was recording 20.7 cases per 100,000, but by September 4 this had risen three-fold to 66.6.

Bath University's Dr Preston said last week: 'In terms of behaviour, one of the things we've been really fearing during winter is the move indoors and its clear role in transmission.

'There's still the unanswered question about the impact of climate humidity, UV light and temperature on survival of the virus but, again, I think that's probably going to be fairly minimal because it looks as if transmission is primarily indoors.

'The indoor environment tends to be relatively stable compared to the outdoors. Whereas outside you might go from -5 to plus 15 that doesn't happen indoors because we control the environment. So whereas outdoors there's a strong set of physical parameters, indoors it's flattened those differences that we control far more.'

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