TOP TRENDING

Coronavirus UK: Most Nightingale hospitals may never be fully open due to a lack of NHS staff


Most Matt Hancock Nightingale hospitals may never be fully open due to insufficient NHS staff to keep them busy.

An analysis by the Sunday Times also shows that every patient admitted to the giant hospitals has cost £ 1 million to treat them so far.

Seven venues, including London's Excel Center, were converted into temporary critical care hospitals for £ 220million at the start of the pandemic.

But only two of them, in London and Manchester, took care of Covid-19 patients at all, caring for around 200 people during the first wave – that's about £ 1 million per patient, according to the Sunday newspaper.

The head of NHS Providers, the affiliate organization for hospital, mental health, community and ambulance services, has also announced that "there aren't hundreds or thousands of NHS workers waiting to be deployed in these hospitals".

Managing Director Chris Hopson said the makeshift hospitals should only be used as a "last resort insurance policy" once existing hospital capacity has been reached.

He added, "In fact, you'd have to take them from existing hospitals."

The claims are likely to raise more questions about the government's coronavirus strategy, including how it spent money during the crisis.

MailOnline has asked the Ministry of Health for a comment.

In other coronavirus developments:

  • The UK recorded 24,957 positive Covid-19 tests in the past 24 hours.
  • Scientists undermined the second shutdown by pointing out that the second peak has already been exceeded and the R-rate is 1;
  • Boris Johnson has been investigating his ministers after a "rat" in the heart of No. 10 leaked news of the newspaper shutdown last Saturday before a decision was made.
  • Six countries have now reported coronavirus cases related to mink farming after a Covid mutation was found in Denmark that spreads from animals to humans.
  • Those who spend time with family members outside their own household at Christmas may have to self-isolate for two weeks afterwards.

Most of Matt Hancock's Nightingale hospitals may never be fully open due to insufficient NHS staff to keep them busy. This has been claimed (Image: Manchester Nightingale).

The Nightingale hospitals were set up across the UK after Boris Johnson and Health Secretary Matt Hancock (pictured) ordered the population to stay at home

The Nightingale hospitals were set up across the UK after Boris Johnson and Health Secretary Matt Hancock (pictured) ordered the population to stay at home

Seven venues, including London's Excel Center, were converted into hospitals for temporary critical care at the start of the pandemic at a cost of £ 220 million

Seven venues, including London's Excel Center, were converted into temporary critical care hospitals for £ 220million at the start of the pandemic

The Nightingale hospitals were set up across the UK after Boris Johnson and the Minister of Health ordered the population to stay at home.

Amid fears the NHS would overflow and 500,000 people would die of coronavirus without closing the country, the government decided to increase the capacity of its intensive care unit within a few weeks.

However, the expected flood of Covid 19 patients did not materialize and left the huge night hospitals in Nightingale practically empty.

Ordinary hospitals in England were also effectively mothballed after practitioners canceled all non-coronavirus treatments.

This has led to a huge increase in preventable deaths from heart attacks and strokes at home and the lack of diagnosis of thousands of cancers.

The UK confirmed another 24,957 positive Covid tests, up just 13.9 percent from last week's total, as top scientists suggest the country's second wave of coronavirus has already peaked

The UK confirmed another 24,957 positive Covid tests, up just 13.9 percent from last week's total, as top scientists suggest the country's second wave of coronavirus has already peaked

The revised numbers now suggest that the second high, with 1,010 deaths per day by December, is likely to be on par with the first with the worst-case scenario

The revised numbers now suggest that the second high, with 1,010 deaths per day by December, will likely be at the same level as the first with the worst-case scenario

Ministers' cell phones searched for "talkative rats" while hunting: Boris Johnson's amazing offer to pin down the tidbit that landed him in the second coronavirus lockdown

Boris Johnson sent security experts to cabinet ministers' homes to examine their personal cell phones as part of a major leak investigation.

Senior figures including Matt Hancock and Michael Gove were urged to hand over their phones when No10 searched for the mole, whose secret disclosure forced the Prime Minister to announce the new lockdown early.

In an effort to expose the "talkative rat" as government sources in the cabinet have synchronized.

Ministers' personal messages were scrutinized as part of the investigation and ordered by an angry Mr Johnson after he announced the English ban at a hastily convened press conference last Saturday.

Hawks believe pro lockdown pigeons disclosed details of the so-called quad meeting of Johnson, Sunak, Gove and Hancock the day before to prevent the prime minister from watering down the shutdown plans.

It also led to a rash display of dubious predictions, with the forecast of up to 4,000 Covid deaths per day by Christmas in the days following the reveal for millions of television viewers being widely discredited.

Official papers show the government expects tens of thousands of people to die of non-covidic conditions as a result of their shutdowns.

No10's decision last week to put England into a four-week lockdown fueled fears the curbs will lead to more preventable deaths without Covid.

Tory backers like Theresa May and Sir Iain Duncan Smith have also warned of the destruction of the economy by stagnation.

Last week, NHS chief Sir Simon Stevens claimed the shutdown was necessary to keep hospitals from overflowing during the second wave.

But his claims have been challenged by rebel conservatives, who have shown official predictions of 4,000 deaths a day by Christmas were wrong.

Others compared Chris Whitty and Sir Patrick Vallance's "shady" Doomsday graphics to the "shady dossier" that led Britain to the war in Iraq in 2002/03.

The UK recorded 24,957 positive Covid tests, up just 13.9 percent from last week's total, as top scientists suspect the second wave has already peaked.

Today's cases – an increase from just 3,045 from 21,915 last Saturday – take place on the first weekend of the country's controversial second lockdown.

Another 413 people have died after testing positive for the virus. These are official figures that have brought the death toll during the pandemic to 48,888.

The death toll in all settings is 26.7 percent higher today than last Saturday (326). That Saturday's number is the second highest daily number reported this week after recording 492 deaths on Monday. Of the deaths reported today, 32 were in Wales, 15 in Northern Ireland and 39 in Scotland.

Professor Tim Spector, who runs the Covid Symptom Study app to track the spread of Covid-19 in the UK, confirmed that there are "positive signs" that the country has already "passed the peak of the second wave".

The epidemiologist at King's College London said: “Although the number of new symptomatic cases is still high at over 40,000 daily, cases over the past week are going in the right direction. The hardest hit areas have improved the most, but there are still large differences between regions. & # 39;

(tagsToTranslate) Dailymail (t) News (t) London (t) NHS Nightingale Hospitals (t) NHS (t) Matt Hancock