ENTERTAINMENT

Coronavirus UK: Landlords must give tenants six months' notice


Robert Jenrick has confirmed that new support measures for tenants will prevent tenants from being evicted until after Christmas.

The government has amended the law to extend the notice period to six months. This means that given notice, tenants can stay in their homes through the winter while they find alternative assistance or accommodation.

Exceptions only apply "in the most egregious cases", even if tenants have shown anti-social behavior or committed fraud.

The Housing Secretary also confirmed that evictions by bailiffs in an area cannot be enforced in a local lockdown that includes a restriction on house collecting.

Mr Jenrick said, “We protected tenants during the pandemic by banning evictions for six months – the UK's longest eviction ban.

Robert Jenrick has confirmed that new support measures for tenants will prevent tenants from being evicted until after Christmas

“In order to continue to support the tenants, we have extended the notice period to six months. This is an unprecedented measure to keep people inside their homes during the winter months.

“It is right that we strike a balance between protecting vulnerable tenants and ensuring access to landlords whose tenants have behaved illegally or antisocially.

"Our legislation means that such cases are subject to shorter notice periods and then prioritized by the new judicial process."

The move was welcomed by charities and council presidents, but activists said the change didn't help people get noticed until August.

Polly Neate, General Manager of Shelter said, “It is a step in the right direction to ensure that eviction tenants have more time to find new homes. And saving families the misery of being evicted over Christmas is the right thing to do.

“However, these measures do not protect the tenants who were notified before August and who could still be subject to an automatic eviction in 10 days after the eviction ban expires.

Emma Burton and her family live in France with their parents after the tenant who rented his Merseyside home stopped paying rent and refused to leave. But because of changes in the evacuation rules, they have tried to regain their home

Emma Burton and her family live in France with their parents after the tenant who rented his Merseyside home stopped paying rent and refused to leave. But because of changes in the evacuation rules, they have tried to regain their home

"And for tenants notified after August, the measures only delay the risk of homelessness."

Last month, a YouGov survey conducted for Shelter found that since the UK pandemic began, nearly 250,000 private renters had fallen behind in their rent payments and 174,000 were at risk of eviction.

Labor said the eviction ban could not end until the government has a "credible plan" to deliver on its promise that no tenant should lose their home to coronavirus.

Thangam Debbonaire, secretary for shadow houses, said: "The announcement shows that the government is preparing for a drastic increase in evictions this winter as coronavirus cases are increasing.

“They threaten public health and put lives at risk.

"You have not prepared for this crisis and urgently need to change course."

Exceptions only apply "in the most egregious cases", even if tenants have shown anti-social behavior or committed fraud

Exceptions only apply "in the most egregious cases", even if tenants have shown anti-social behavior or committed fraud

The Department of Housing, Communities and Local Government (MHCLG) announced that it will continue to review measures and decisions will be guided by the latest public health recommendations.

It is said that the courts will resume property hearings from Sept. 21, with cases of antisocial behavior and other crimes as well as arrears of rent taking priority.

No cases before August 3 will be immediately referred to a hearing, but will need to be reactivated and re-examined by the landlord, the MHCLG added.

The department said landlords must also provide information to the courts and judges about how tenants have been affected by the pandemic. The process can be suspended until the information is available.

The MHCLG added: “No landlord, including those who rent only a single property, has had access to the courts since March, including to regain possession in cases where the tenant has broken the law.

“So it is right that landlords not only have measures to protect vulnerable people but also have access to justice. The government would like to thank the landlords for their indulgence during this difficult time. & # 39;

There will also be a "winter truce" for enforcement of evictions, with no evictions before and over Christmas in England and Wales, except in the "most serious circumstances" such as antisocial behavior or domestic abuse, the department said.

Bailiffs are being told not to enforce possession orders during the Christmas weeks, he added.

However, landlord groups have previously stated that their members have remained “powerless” to deal with non-payment of rent.

The British Landlords Association described a similar move as "devastating" in Wales in July, some of which were "already facing financial problems".

BLA chief Sajjad Ahmad called on the government to offer financial aid to landlords, saying at the time: "Landlords cannot bear this financial burden alone, they need help."

Some in England have called for more help to ease the financial pressures on landlords on top of the mortgage vacation.

Chris Norris, Political Director of the National Residential Landlords Association, welcomed the news that the courts would resume hearing property cases on September 21.

"It is important that this happens so that landlords can take action against antisocial tenants, those who commit domestic violence and those with rent arrears who have nothing to do with Covid-19," he said.

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