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Coronavirus UK: 47 new deaths in daily preliminary death toll


The UK recorded another 7,143 coronavirus cases and 71 deaths today as the outbreak continues to rise.

For comparison, 4,926 new infections and 37 deaths were registered last Tuesday.

It comes as separate official data revealed weekly deaths are up 40 percent in a week.

The UK coronavirus death toll is currently over 42,000. Only the United States, Brazil, India and Mexico, all countries with much larger populations, have suffered more deaths.

An Office for National Statistics (ONS) report released today found 139 people in England and Wales had succumbed to the life-threatening disease in the week ending September 18, up from 99 in the last seven days (40.5 percent).

This is the third straight week that the Covid-19 death toll has risen after hitting a record low of 78 in early September. For comparison: In April, 900 people died from the virus every day.

The weekly increase could confirm experts' fears that rising infections in the past few weeks would ultimately lead to more deaths, although it's too early to say for good. Cases have been on the rise since July 4th, when hundreds of thousands of Britons flocked to pubs, bars and restaurants to celebrate "Super Saturday" after being allowed to reopen after months of closings to contain the life-threatening virus.

Until recently, hospital stays and deaths had remained low and stable despite rising cases – largely because it was mostly young, healthy people who drove the gears. Both have since started recovering as the virus penetrated elderly and vulnerable populations.

However, the number of victims dying from the disease each week is still a long way from the more than 8,000 deaths per week at the height of the crisis. The ONS report also shows that flu and pneumonia killed eight times more people than Covid-19 in the week leading up to September 18.

700 people are now still dying in their homes than medical professionals would expect at this time of year. This underscores the negative health impact of the pandemic on the country.

Experts say many people are still too anxious to use the NHS because they fear getting Covid-19 while others don't want to weigh on healthcare. Hospitals are still trying to get services back up and running, cutting waiting lists for records after working at a fraction of their capacity for months.

The UK recorded another 47 coronavirus deaths today in the tentative total. To date, more than 42,000 Britons have died from the disease

The number of coronavirus deaths in England and Wales has risen 40 percent in a week. This graph shows the deaths from Covid-19 (red) compared to the total deaths (blue) and the average of the last five years (dashed line).

The number of coronavirus deaths in England and Wales has risen 40 percent in a week. This graph shows the deaths from Covid-19 (red) compared to the total deaths (blue) and the average of the last five years (dashed line).

The total number of deaths in the UK remained above the five-year average, as this graph shows, with 259 deaths more than expected. Statisticians had estimated that deaths could fall below the five-year average as the coronavirus accelerated the deaths of those who would have died of other reasons

The total number of deaths in the UK remained above the five-year average, as this graph shows, with 259 deaths more than expected. Statisticians had estimated that deaths could fall below the five-year average as the coronavirus accelerated the deaths of those who would have died of other reasons

Coronavirus deaths rose in six of England's nine regions. The North East and London were the only regions with fewer overall deaths than the five-year average

Coronavirus deaths rose in six of England's nine regions. The North East and London were the only regions with fewer overall deaths than the five-year average

How the number of new coronavirus cases announced daily has changed since the first wave of the pandemic, when hardly any patient was tested for the disease. Top experts believe that more than 100,000 cases actually occurred every day in the spring

How the number of new coronavirus cases announced daily has changed since the first wave of the pandemic, when hardly any patient was tested for the disease. Top experts believe that more than 100,000 cases actually occurred every day in the spring

Daily Covid-19 cases DROP for the first time in fourteen days: UK records 4,044 more infections and 13 deaths

The UK recorded 4,044 more cases of coronavirus yesterday when official figures showed the daily average number of infections fell for the first time in a fortnight.

Infections have risen steadily since July 4th, when hundreds of thousands of Brits flocked to pubs, bars and restaurants to celebrate "Super Saturday" after they were finally allowed to reopen after months of closure to contain the life-threatening virus.

But they're still nowhere near as high as they were in the darkest days of the UK's Covid-19 crisis in March and April, when top scientists estimate that more than 100,000 cases have actually occurred every day.

Health chiefs also recorded 13 more coronavirus deaths today, bringing the total number of laboratory-confirmed victims to 42,000 within 28 days of being diagnosed. Only the United States, Brazil, India and Mexico, all countries with much larger populations, have suffered more deaths.

17 deaths were reported yesterday, up from 34 on Saturday, although deaths are typically lower on Sundays and Mondays due to a delay in recording. The moving average number of deaths is 30 compared to 22 last Monday and 12 the week before.

Until recently, hospital stays and deaths had remained low and stable despite rising infections. But both have since started to tip. Around 314 newly infected patients required NHS treatment in England on September 23 – the highest number since June. And daily deaths hit a 10-week high last Thursday – when 40 deaths were recorded for the first time since July 14.

The seven-day moving average for the number of daily infections is now 5,770, compared to 5,816 yesterday – a value that has increased every day since it fell slightly to 2,998 on September 14. For comparison: the seven-day moving average of new infections. Cases stood at 3,929 last Monday after 4,368 infections were registered.

In other coronavirus developments in the UK today:

  • Boris Johnson was ridiculed for apologizing that the lockdown rules were wrong in the Northeast – hours after another minister admitted she didn't know friends could hang out in pub gardens;
  • The prime minister tried desperately to quell Tory mutinies over coronavirus lockdowns.
  • It has been claimed that thanks to real-time data from the NHS app, local bans could be imposed within 24 hours of a coronavirus outbreak.
  • Middle-aged customers are “humiliated” by “app students” in pubs and restaurants who forbid them to enter without the NHS Covid-19 app – despite government regulations that state that this is not mandatory.

Health Department data shows the total number of coronavirus victims in the UK is currently 42,001. This only takes into account patients who died within 28 days of the positive Covid-19 test.

An average of 30 British people succumb to the life-threatening disease every day. That number – based on numbers for the past seven days – has barely changed since Thursday when it was 28. For comparison: it had doubled from 14 on the same day the previous week.

Open University statistician Professor Kevin McConway said the surge in coronavirus deaths "is still not too worrying." However, he warned that the current surge in infections may not affect life for another two or three weeks as the time it takes Covid-19 patients to get seriously ill and die is delayed.

He said: "These numbers are not yet too worrying, I would argue, given that the weekly number of Covid-related deaths through late July or early August was higher than these levels. So this is by no means a huge increase in deaths.

However, the recent surge in infection numbers, based on data from the ONS infection survey and Imperial College REACT-1 study, didn't start until late August or early September.

"If the surge in infections leads to a corresponding rise in the number of deaths – it seems very likely, but we cannot be entirely sure yet – that rise has largely not happened yet."

"That's because it takes a few weeks for an infected person to get sick enough to be hospitalized and eventually die sadly."

& # 39; While the increase in registered death with Covid on the certificate is the first sign of a surge related to the surge in infections, we will have to wait a week or two to see if and how that surge continues . & # 39;

This week's surge in Covid-19 deaths marks the highest number of deaths from the virus since the week ending August 14, when 139 people succumbed to the disease.

Six out of nine regions in England saw an increase in deaths from coronavirus, with the Northwest having the largest number and highest proportion of deaths from the disease at 39.

The northwest had the most coronavirus deaths and the highest proportion of deaths from the disease at 39.

This was followed by Yorkshire and The Humber (21), West Midlands (15), East Midlands (14), London (13) and South East (11).

The northeast and east of England recorded eight coronavirus deaths each, while five were recorded in the southwest and Wales.

The data showed that coronavirus deaths in hospitals nearly doubled from 1.6 percent in the week ended September 11 to 2.5 percent, and in nursing homes rose from 1.3 percent to 1.6 percent.

Influenza and pneumonia killed eight times more people than Covid-19 in the week ended September 18, with 1,197 people developing respiratory diseases.

This was a slight increase over the previous year's figure of 1,125 and more than a third (37 percent) more than two weeks ago when the total was 874.

In the week ending September 18, there were a total of 9,523 deaths from all causes, which is 259 more deaths than would normally be expected at this time of year (9,264).

It's the second straight week that deaths are above the five-year average, after 9,811 people died last week in England and Wales.

The North East and London were the only two of England's nine regions to have fewer overall deaths than the five-year average.

In the West Midlands, the proportion of deaths was 98 or 10.3 percent, above the five-year average, followed by the Southeast (6.9 percent), the Northwest (4.9 percent), Yorkshire and The Humber (3.8 percent)) , East Midlands (2.1 percent). South West (2 percent) and East England (1.2 percent).

However, there are still fewer deaths in nursing homes and hospitals than normal at this time of year. ONS experts stated that Covid-19 likely accelerated the deaths of people who would have died from other reasons, which means the deaths of the year were loaded from the start.

Deaths in private homes rose above the five-year average this week, but stayed below that in hospitals. They also fell below the level for nursing homes

Deaths in private homes rose above the five-year average this week but stayed below that in hospitals. They also fell below the level for nursing homes

In the week ending September 18, 64 percent of coronavirus deaths occurred in the hospital (light green). This graph shows the deaths broken down by place of death

In the week ending September 18, 64 percent of coronavirus deaths occurred in the hospital (light green). This graph shows the deaths broken down by place of death

People aged 75 and over are the most likely to die from coronavirus, according to this table, while very few deaths have been recorded for people between the ages of 0 and 44. The diagrams are broken down by gender (male in blue and female in green).

People aged 75 and over are the most likely to die from coronavirus, according to this table, while very few deaths have been recorded for people between the ages of 0 and 44. The diagrams are broken down by gender (male in blue and female in green).

However, the number of deaths in private households remained above the five-year average. 711 more than average died from a range of diseases including heart disease, stroke and cancer. It suggests that the British are still not using or struggling to access health care as most services have limited capacity.

The ONS also estimates that a total of 52,631 people have died of coronavirus in the UK so far. In Scotland, 4,246 people have died of coronavirus since the outbreak began. Northern Ireland has reported 893 deaths from Covid-19 as of September 18, which means a total of 57,113 people have died from the disease in the UK since the outbreak began.

This differs from the government's 42,001 figure as the ONS includes all victims who had the virus on their death certificates, even if they were not diagnosed with the virus or had a confirmed test.

Of all deaths from coronavirus, data shows hospitals recorded 63.4 percent of all deaths, or 33,386 deaths. The second highest number is in nursing homes with 15,562, followed by private homes, 2,502, hospices, 753 and other locations, 428.

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