ENTERTAINMENT

Coronavirus UK: 17 m now under two higher restricted levels


Boris Johnson warned tonight that the UK could not ignore the "flashing warnings" about growing coronavirus cases as he plunged millions of people deeper into lockdown.

The Prime Minister unveiled his new "three tier" system, stating that Liverpool will be the first area to be subject to the highest restrictions – which means pubs will be closed and households will not be mixed indoors or in gardens.

However, there was trouble when another part of the country is thrown into Tier Two. Bars are allowed to stay open, but households are not allowed to mix indoors. Many of the locations already have similar curbs, but others – like Manchester and the West Midlands – are set to tighten.

Confusingly, in some other places the rules are being relaxed as the rules are being "streamlined".

Mr Johnson insisted that he had no choice but to see the UK record an additional 13,972 Covid cases today – up 11 percent from last Monday. Liverpool's case rate per 100,000 population rose 14.3 percent to 609 in the past week.

At a press conference # 10 next to Chancellor Rishi Sunak and Chief Medical Officer Chris Whitty, Mr Johnson said tonight, "The numbers are flashing at us like warnings on the dashboard of a passenger plane and we must act now."

He added: None of me want to impose these kinds of restrictions, erosions of our personal freedom, but I believe, as always, that the British people have the determination to fight this virus and that together we will do just that . & # 39;

However, Prof. Whitty risked undermining the Prime Minister's finely calibrated message by pointing out that the "professional view" was that basic level three measures were "not enough" to control the virus. He urged local leaders to use the "space" in the rules to tighten restrictions.

More than 17 million people are affected by the two higher levels of risk in the new system of government, while the rest of England is subject to bars and restaurants curfew after the 6am and 10pm rule.

As of 5:00 p.m. Wednesday, people in Tier 3 Liverpool are only allowed to leave the area for important trips such as work, education or health and must return before the end of the day – although the rules are more guidelines than legally enforced. They cannot mix with other households in gardens, but in public outdoor areas subject to the rule of six.

Restaurants are allowed to open, but only in accordance with the curfew, and can serve alcohol as long as someone has a "substantial" meal, according to # 10. Sources insisted that this could not be just a line like a packet of chips.

When businesses are forced to close, the government pays two-thirds of each employee's salary, up to a maximum of £ 2,100 per month. A £ 28 million package is expected to be in place to help parts of the country that are classified as Tier Three. Mr Johnson said the total assistance offered would be around £ 1 billion.

Liverpool is the only area in the top tier so far and the city is going beyond the basic restrictions by closing leisure centers, gyms, betting shops and casinos. Mr Johnson hinted that other hotspots were resisting and wiped out that it would be "unforgivable" not to consent to the raids.

Tier Two includes Greater Manchester, which was rescued from the tallest curbs after frantic lobbying by Mayor Andy Burnham and local MPs, as well as the North East, West Midlands, Nottingham and Leicester.

London is not expected to be in the second stage immediately, but Sadiq Khan's spokeswoman warned it could happen "this week" after a conference call with district leaders. Londoners should understand that this could change very quickly – possibly even this week.

Some places, like Oldham and Warrington, will actually relax their restrictions as households cannot mix in gardens right now. No10 has promised a full breakdown of restrictions across England will be released later.

When the coronavirus crisis enters a new worrying phase:

  • The UK today registered 13,972 new coronavirus cases, up nearly 11 percent last Monday and an additional 50 deaths.
  • Nicola Sturgeon said Scotland will introduce its own "tiered" lockdown system after attending the Cobra meeting today, but said she wanted the British nations to be "aligned as closely as possible".
  • Professor Van-Tam warned that because of the rise in cases, more deaths and hospitalizations had already been "burned in" when he gave a grim assessment of the COVID situation and later turned down the Prime Minister's announcements.
  • Britain is still well below the dire forecast of 50,000 cases per day that Sir Patrick Vallance warned about at the time. However, 12,872 new infections were reported yesterday – an increase of 9 percent over the adjusted total from last Sunday.
  • Researchers found that Covid-19 can survive for a month on surfaces like banknotes and phone screens.
  • City hall chiefs are given the power to use volunteers to knock on doors and ask people to self-isolate.
  • Union leaders in the north demanded more cash from the government to support the lockdown and called the new vacation program "inadequate".
  • The BCG vaccine was given to 1,000 people in an Exeter University study to test claims that it helps fight Covid by stimulating the immune system.

The government issued a table breaking down the restrictions into their "levels" to clarify the situation today

Deputy Head Physician Jonathan Van-Tam

Boris Johnson (at a # 10 press conference tonight) is furious after finally introducing the government's new coronavirus lockdown system for traffic lights. Deputy Chief Medical Officer Jonathan Van-Tam (right) highlighted grim numbers in No. 10 this morning at a press conference

Deputy Chief Medical Officer Jonathan Van-Tam presented the government's latest assessment of the COVID situation using diagrams at a briefing today

Deputy Chief Medical Officer Jonathan Van-Tam presented the government's latest assessment of the COVID situation using diagrams at a briefing today

More than 17 million people are affected by the two higher levels of risk in the new system of government, while the rest of England is subject to bars and restaurants curfew after the 6am and 10pm rule

More than 17 million people are affected by the two higher levels of risk in the new system of government, while the rest of England is subject to bars and restaurants curfew after the 6am and 10pm rule

How England is collapsing in new levels of COVID

ANIMAL THREE – VERY HIGH RISK

Liverpool City Region

Liverpool, Knowsley, Wirral, St. Helens, Sefton, Halton

TIER TWO – HIGH RISK

Cheshire

Cheshire West and Chester, Cheshire East

Greater Manchester

Manchester, Bolton, buried, Stockport, Tameside, Trafford, Wigan, Salford, Rochdale, Oldham,

Warrington

Derbyshire

High Peak – the wards of Tintwistle, Padfield, Dinting, St. Johns – Old Glossop, Whitfield, Simmondley, Gamesley, Howard Town, Hadfield South, Hadfield North

Lancashire

Lancashire, Blackpool, Preston, Blackburn with Darwen, Burnley

West Yorkshire

Leeds, Bradford, Kirklees, Calderdale, South Wakefield

Yorkshire

Barnsley, Rotherham, Doncaster, Sheffield

Northeast

Newcastle, South Tyneside, North Tyneside, Gateshead, Sunderland, Durham, Northumberland

Tees Valley

Middlesborough, Redcar and Cleveland, Stockton-on-Tees, Darlington, Hartlepool

West Midlands

Birmingham, Sandwell, Solihull, Wolverhampton, Walsall

Leicester

Leicester, Oadby and Wigston

Nottingham

Nottinghamshire, Nottingham City

TIER ONE – MEDIUM RISK

Rest of england

In a previous statement to the Commons, Mr Johnson said MPs deaths are already rising.

"The coming weeks and months will continue to be difficult and will test the capabilities of this country," he said.

But he emphasized: "Retail, schools and universities remain open."

The number of cases has quadrupled in the past three weeks. There are now more people in the hospital with Covid than when we were locked in on March 23, and the death toll is already rising. & # 39;

Mr Johnson said the R-value is already being suppressed to "well below" its natural level by government restrictions.

But he said it was necessary to "go further" without imposing a complete lockdown that "would destroy our lives and our society".

"Over the past few months we've worked with local executives to address local spikes with targeted restrictions. However, this local approach has inevitably resulted in different rules in different parts of the country that are now complex to understand and enforce," said Johnson.

He added: “We are now going to simplify and standardize our local rules by introducing a three-tier system of local Covid alarm levels in England, which is set to medium, high and very high.

& # 39; The medium alert will cover most of the country and will consist of the current national measures, including the rule of six and the hospitality closing at 10pm.

& # 39; The high alert level reflects the current interventions in many local areas.

“This is primarily aimed at reducing household-to-household transmission by preventing any inter-household mixing or indoor support bubbles.

"In these areas, the rule of six continues to apply outdoors, where it is more difficult for the virus to spread in public spaces and private gardens."

He said local authorities in England will receive around £ 1 billion in "new financial aid".

"For very high areas, we will continue to provide financial support for local testing and tracing, as well as local enforcement – and support from the armed forces, not for enforcement, but to support local services if the region so desires," he said .

The prime minister said an agreement had been reached with leaders in Merseyside and said that she would be on a very high level of alert from Wednesday – with the closure of gyms, leisure centers, betting shops, adult game centers and casinos.

Mr Johnson said: “Engagement with other executives in the North West, North East, Yorkshire and Humber continues.

"I know how difficult it is, they like us, like everyone in this house struggling with very real dilemmas, but we can't let the NHS fall over when lives are at stake."

He urged local authorities to "work with us on these difficult but necessary actions in the areas that are considered very high" in order to get more support, adding: "I believe it would be unforgivable not to act and hope that rapid progress can be made. " in the coming days. & # 39;

The rules will be set in the House of Commons tonight and voted tomorrow, added Mr Johnson, before insisting that the measures be subject to "ongoing" review.

But the prime minister faced strong Tories opposition to the announcements.

West Midlands Mayor Andy Street said he was "disappointed" that the region had been ranked second, claiming the government had ignored the views of local leaders.

In the House of Commons, the Prime Minister has been repeatedly asked to review the 10 p.m. curfew and trust people to exercise their own common sense rather than restrict their freedom.

Mr Street said the stricter measures on Birmingham and the West Midlands were "not something the regional leaders supported, nor what I believed after extensive discussions over the past few days".

PM faces Tory game due to lockdown push

Boris Johnson was criticized by Tory for setting out his three-step approach to coronavirus restrictions.

West Midlands Mayor Andy Street said he was "disappointed" that the region had been ranked second, claiming the government had ignored the views of local leaders.

In the House of Commons, the Prime Minister has been repeatedly asked to review the 10 p.m. curfew and trust people to exercise their own common sense rather than restrict their freedom.

Mr Street said the stricter measures for Birmingham and the West Midlands were "neither what the regional leaders supported nor what I believed after extensive discussions over the past few days".

He added: “The main change between our current restrictions and the new restrictions announced today is the ban on mixing households in restaurants.

"This is something that recent local epidemiology does not support and I am disappointed that the government is pushing this forward despite the shared view of local leaders."

In Parliament, Sir Graham Brady, chairman of the influential Tory Committee in 1922, asked how Mr Johnson would prevent local restrictions from becoming a "permanent state".

Mr Johnson insisted that the measures be "continuously reviewed".

Tory MP Philip Davies urged Mr Johnson "to put their trust in the British people to act responsibly" rather than "a constant blizzard of arbitrary rules designed only to collapse the economy and destroy businesses and jobs".

He added: “The main change between our current restrictions and the new restrictions announced today is the ban on mixing households in restaurants.

"This is something that recent local epidemiology does not support and I am disappointed that the government is pushing this forward despite the shared view of local leaders."

In Parliament, Sir Graham Brady, chairman of the influential Tory Committee in 1922, asked how Mr Johnson would prevent local restrictions from becoming a "permanent state".

Mr Johnson insisted that the measures be "continuously reviewed".

Tory MP Philip Davies urged Mr Johnson "to put their trust in the British people to act responsibly" rather than "a constant blizzard of arbitrary rules designed only to collapse the economy and destroy businesses and jobs".

Mr Johnson replied, "The best decision that individuals can make for themselves, their families and for communities is to follow the directions, wash hands, face and room, protect the NHS and save lives."

Conservative Mark Pawsey (rugby) said the 10pm curfew resulted in many people "leaving the pub to go to a store to get some alcohol, often with their friends to have a drink at home." ".

And former minister Tobias Ellwood called for a review of the curfew "as urgently as possible".

Mr. Johnson replied, “Unfortunately we have to limit the total volume of broadcasts that takes place in our society. It's an obvious place to make a change, that's what we do. & # 39;

Previously, Deputy Chief Medical Officer Jonathan Van-Tam and NHS Medical Director Stephen Powis were sent out to roll the pitch giving their grim assessment of the situation.

They told a briefing on Downing Street that the number of patients in the hospital is now higher than it was before the blanket lockdown in March – and could be above the previous high within four weeks. Nightingale hospitals in the worst hit areas are reopening on a large scale.

Professor Van-Tam also sent the clear message that the surge in cases was more of a "nationwide phenomenon" than just in the north, spreading from younger people to the more vulnerable older generation.

Prof. Powis said the hope that the elderly could be isolated from the rise in infections turned out to be "wishful thinking".

Mr Johnson is furious today when he finally reveals the government's blocking of the coronavirus on traffic lights – ministers warn it could last until Christmas.

Mr Johnson held an emergency Cobra meeting this morning to finalize the plan after a weekend of hectic discussions with politicians and scientists. He will face questions at a press conference # 10 tonight.

Pubs threaten the SAE ministers over curbs

The UK hotel industry is challenging the government lockdown restrictions to halt their plans to close pubs and other venues to combat the surge in coronavirus cases.

The Night Time Industries Association (NTIA) announced late Sunday that the industry has taken legal action to prevent lockdown measures from being imposed.

The judicial review will argue that there is no evidence to suggest that eateries contributed to the spread of COVID-19.

"The industry has no choice but to legally challenge the government's so-called 'common sense' narrative to implement further restrictions in the north of England," said Michael Kill, CEO of NTIA, in an email.

"These new measures will have catastrophic effects on night sales and will be compounded by an inadequate financial support package," the statement said.

The prime minister defies the wrath of local leaders and Tory MPs for pushing the new system forward as he struggles desperately to deal with the growing cases.

The row over the details – which will be voted on in the House of Commons tomorrow – went on the wire as politicians tried to get more money out of the government.

Commenting on Briefing # 10 this morning, Professor Powis said: “It is clear that hospital admissions are rising fastest in the areas of the country where infection rates are highest, especially in the northwest.

"In those over 65 – especially those over 85 – the number of people being hospitalized is increasing sharply. The claim that older people can somehow be shielded from risk is wishful thinking."

Prof. Van-Tam used a series of diagrams to emphasize his concerns about the snowball situation.

"It changed in a matter of days and that is clearly a concern of mine," he said. "There is the spread from these younger age groups to the over 60 age group in the northwest and northeast, and there are rates of change in the same places but also extending a little further south."

The experts revealed that temporary Nightingale hospitals in Manchester, Sunderland and Harrogate could be reopened to help with the spike in Covid-19 cases.

Prof. Powis said there would also be more tests of health workers in hotspot areas.

He said: “To protect our employees and our patients, we will use tests from the Test and Trace service to introduce regular tests for employees in these risk areas, even if they have no symptoms.

“This will help us keep staff and patients as safe as possible in these hospitals.

Second, we asked the Nightingale hospitals in Manchester, Sunderland and Harrogate to prepare for this next phase.

"You are asked to mobilize in the next few weeks to be able to admit patients if necessary."

It will be up to the local doctors to decide whether to use it for Covid patients or to provide additional capacity to maintain services for people without coronavirus.

Medics alerted the south to curbs because the COVID surge is NOT limited to the north

Government advisors today alerted the south of new lockdown restrictions and warned that the problems were not limited to the north.

Prof. Jonathan Van-Tam said the increase in the north so far was partly due to the fact that cases there were not so low in the summer.

He insisted the surge was a "nationwide phenomenon" and said additional deaths had already been "burned in" due to the delay between infection and serious illness.

"With the cases we know of, we've already made additional hospitalizations, and unfortunately we've also burned in additional deaths that are now due to infections that have already occurred," he said.

He said the problem was "nationwide" and not just a problem for northern England.

On a slide shown earlier in the discussion about rising rates in the south of England, he said: “You have now worried me that I may have presented a bipolar picture that Covid-19 is a problem in the north and not a problem in the south.

“On the contrary, this time the epidemic increased significantly earlier in the north of England than in the first wave, and this is almost certainly due to the fact that the disease level never increases in the north and certainly in the north-west.

“But pretty much every area in the UK is now seeing an increase in the rate of infection, and this expanded brown map that I showed you, from the Joint Biosecurity Center, makes that absolutely clear.

"This is a nationwide phenomenon as interest rates move upwards across the UK."

Prof. Van-Tam warned that due to the increase in cases and the delay between infection and serious illness, additional deaths have already been “burned in”.

"We have already made additional hospital admissions with the cases we are aware of, and unfortunately we have also burned in additional deaths that are now due to infections that have already occurred," he said.

He said the problem was "nationwide" and not just a problem for northern England.

On a slide shown during the briefing about rising rates in the south of England, he said: “You have now worried me that I may have presented a bipolar picture, that Covid-19 is a problem in the north and not a problem in the north is the south.

“On the contrary, this time the epidemic increased significantly earlier in the north of England than in the first wave, and this is almost certainly due to the fact that the disease level never increases in the north and certainly in the north-west.

“But pretty much every area in the UK is now seeing an increase in the rate of infection, and this expanded brown map that I showed you, from the Joint Biosecurity Center, makes it very clear.

"This is a nationwide phenomenon as interest rates move upwards across the UK."

When asked about the transmission of the disease in the hospitality industry, the doctor said, “We know that the virus lives on what we like best, namely human contact

"We have increasingly strong evidence of shouting and singing as pressure points on the virus to further expel virus-laden particles and therefore make transmission more intense."

Despite the spike that coincided with the return of schools, Prof. Van-Tam said they didn't seem to be the driver of the spike.

“If you carefully break up salami infection data across school age groups, you actually see a very small increase in infection rates up to around the age of 16, and a slight increase in 17-18 year olds as we dive into that age group … Of really quite intense transmission, ”he said.

“The evidence that there is significant transmission in schools is not really confirmed by the increased infection rates, and we already know that children are not drivers of infection and that they spread to the community just as we know they are against, for example Are influenza. & # 39;

Despite the claim that the three-tier system was part of an effort to simplify the rules across England, they are allowed to differ slightly within the very high risk area.

Areas like Manchester were fighting desperately to be kept out of the toughest category.

Greater Manchester Mayor Andy Burnham tweeted that he was "glad the government listened" and that he had avoided subjecting the region to the harshest lockdown measures.

He added, “But any restrictions will result in trade losses for businesses and challenges for councils. The Prime Minister must give full financial support to all areas with restrictions. Everything else will level them out. & # 39;

Oldham West and Royton MP Jim McMahon also welcomed the news.

& # 39; Pubs serving food stay open. Oldham will be removed from its extended lockdown measures and * finally * brought into line with GM, ”he wrote.

Labor Frontbench colleague Lisa Nandy complained about being banned from meeting with Health Secretary Matt Hancock in Greater Manchester despite her constituency being in the area. "I suppose that's because they don't know where Wigan is," she snapped.

There was speculation that London would immediately move into the second stage, which would mean still tighter limits on household socialization. This is not happening yet, however, as Mr Khan is at odds with some members of the government who want a city-to-city approach rather than London-to-whole.

Actions will be carried out for four weeks initially before a review is carried out. However, Culture Secretary Oliver Dowden suggested this morning that they are expected to remain in effect until Christmas.

A disgruntled Tory MP for a seat in the north told MailOnline, "I won't be walking around his house on December 25th."

They added, "It will be very frustrating when pubs close with 48 hours notice." Why not focus on the elderly and vulnerable and save jobs and lives? & # 39;

Another MP from an affected region complained that the government was "walking around like headless chickens".

Tier 2 does not allow households to mix indoors, similar to what is already the case in Middlesbrough and Hartlepool, while Tier One complies with the rules currently in force across England.

In a round of interviews, Mr Dowden said this morning that tough new coronavirus restrictions may be required until after Christmas.

Mr Dowden told Sky News, “If these measures are successful, we hope to get areas out of these high restrictions.

Doctors are better placed to save lives this time

Doctors are now in a "better position" to treat Covid-19 than they were in March and April, says a senior NHS official

British doctors are able to treat Covid-19 better than they were in March and April, according to one of the top NHS officials.

Professor Stephen Powis, the medical director of NHS England, told the television briefing on Downing Street that the nation "clearly has learned many things from that first wave".

He said, "We have learned better treatments for patients and dexamethasone … we have learned that it reduces the number of deaths."

Dexamethasone was added to doctors' arsenal for the treatment of coronavirus in June after Oxford University researchers demonstrated it can help critically ill patients.

The cheap and widely available steroid, believed to cost £ 5 per patient, saves lives by calming the immune system.

Medical advice says that it should only be given in "severe and critical" cases, as milder infections could make the disease worse by impairing the body's ability to fight it off.

Professor Powis's claims come after separate data showed today that the coronavirus's chances of surviving from a serious illness have increased significantly since the pandemic began.

The proportion of patients who die in intensive care units in hospitals has fallen from around 30 percent to less than 20 percent since April.

Even more noticeable is the decline in the death rate in relation to all hospitalized patients – from 6 percent at its peak to around 2 percent.

“This is to ensure that we have the virus under control so that after Christmas we will be in the position where it is under control.

"In fact, I hope it will be sooner."

Mr Dowden denied the government was panicking over rising cases and the imposition of knee-jerk curbs.

& # 39; We're certainly not in a panic. We are taking sensible and proportionate action because we can see that the risk is falling by the wayside, ”he told BBC Radio 4's Today program.

'Unfortunately, it is the case that the number of deaths tends to lag behind the number of infections. If you look at the leading indicators – both the number of infections and now, unfortunately, the number of people who are in hospitals with Covid – they all point to a rapidly increasing disease. The way is very clear. & # 39;

Mr Dowden said the case for new restrictions on the hospitality industry was supported by the government’s key scientific advisor, Sir Patrick Vallance.

“We know there are challenges with hospitality – for example, the obvious point that you can't wear a mask when you sit down and eat, that you are in frequent contact (with people) you don't normally meet , and we know that the virus thrives on this kind of social interaction. & # 39;

Nach dem Cobra-Treffen heute Morgen äußerte der erste walisische Minister Mark Drakeford "tiefe Enttäuschung über die unzureichenden Vorschläge für Reisebeschränkungen in Gebieten mit hoher Infektion in England".

In einer Erklärung sagte die walisische Regierung, sie würden "in vielen Teilen von Wales, wo die Infektionsraten niedriger sind, auf große Bestürzung stoßen".

"Er forderte auch mehr Klarheit über die Metriken für die Einteilung von Bereichen in jede Ebene und stimmte anderen dezentralen Führungskräften zu, dass die Vorschläge des Finanzministeriums zur finanziellen Unterstützung zwar willkommen, aber nicht weit genug gingen, um die am schlechtesten bezahlten Arbeitnehmer zu schützen", sagte ein Sprecher.

Vaughan Gething, der Gesundheitsminister von Wales, sagte auf einer Pressekonferenz: „Ich und der Erste Minister treffen uns heute wieder, aber wir sind beide sehr enttäuscht, dass der Premierminister immer noch einen Ansatz verfolgt, bei dem es nur Leitlinien dafür gibt, ob Menschen sollten oder sollten nicht aus stark infizierten Gebieten reisen.

"Dies ist nicht nur ein Problem für Wales, sondern ein Problem für ganz Großbritannien. Gebiete mit niedrigerer Prävalenz in England werden ebenso betroffen sein wie Gebiete mit niedrigerer Prävalenz in Wales."

"Wir verstehen, dass bereits Coronavirus-Fälle aus dem Kontakt mit einigen dieser Gebiete mit hoher Prävalenz in England importiert wurden."

Herr Gething sagte, die walisische Regierung, die erwogen hat, Quarantänebeschränkungen für Personen aufzuerlegen, die aus Gebieten des Vereinigten Königreichs mit hohem Coronavirus-Gehalt nach Wales kommen, werde sich später am Montag treffen und "Entscheidungen treffen".

Frau Sturgeon sagte, sie stelle eine schottische Version der Stufen zusammen und werde versuchen, sich so eng wie möglich mit dem Rest des Vereinigten Königreichs abzustimmen.

"Auf strategischer Ebene werden wir versuchen, uns so eng wie möglich mit den anderen britischen Nationen abzustimmen. Ich denke, es ist wichtig und es ist sinnvoll, dies zu versuchen", sagte sie.

"Ich möchte jedoch betonen, dass operative Entscheidungen darüber, welche Ebenen in welchen Teilen unserer Nationen gelten können, für jeden von uns auf einer verteilten Ebene zu treffen sind."

Sturgeon begrüßt die "gute" Einhaltung ihrer "Leistungsschalter" -Sperre

Nicola Sturgeon bestand darauf, dass die Einhaltung ihrer Sperre für Leistungsschalter am Wochenende „gut“ gewesen sei.

Pubs und Restaurants im zentralen Gürtel Schottlands wurden geschlossen, während an anderer Stelle Alkohol nur im Außenbereich ausgeschenkt werden kann.

Bei der täglichen Besprechung der schottischen Regierung in Edinburgh sagte Frau Sturgeon: „Die frühen anekdotischen Beweise, die wir von der Polizei erhalten haben, deuten darauf hin, dass die Einhaltung der neuen Regeln und der Regeln im Allgemeinen gut war.

'Das ist ermutigend – diese neuen Beschränkungen sind wirklich hart für alle und sie sind hart für Unternehmen, insbesondere im Gastgewerbe.

"Niemand ist sich dessen nicht bewusst, aber sie sind von entscheidender Bedeutung, um die Zunahme der Fälle einzudämmen, sie wieder unter Kontrolle zu bringen und natürlich die Zunahme der Krankenhauseinweisungen und Krankheiten, die wir gesehen haben, einzudämmen."

Frau Sturgeon sagte, dass die schottische Regierung nach zweiwöchigen Maßnahmen die langfristige Unterdrückung des Virus sicherstellen will.

Frau Sturgeon bestand darauf, dass die Einhaltung ihrer Sperrung für Leistungsschalter am Wochenende „gut“ gewesen sei.

Pubs und Restaurants im zentralen Gürtel Schottlands wurden geschlossen, während an anderer Stelle Alkohol nur im Außenbereich ausgeschenkt werden kann.

Bei der täglichen Besprechung der schottischen Regierung in Edinburgh sagte Frau Sturgeon: „Die frühen anekdotischen Beweise, die wir von der Polizei erhalten haben, deuten darauf hin, dass die Einhaltung der neuen Regeln und der Regeln im Allgemeinen gut war.

'Das ist ermutigend – diese neuen Beschränkungen sind wirklich hart für alle und sie sind hart für Unternehmen, insbesondere im Gastgewerbe.

"Niemand ist sich dessen nicht bewusst, aber sie sind von entscheidender Bedeutung, um die Zunahme der Fälle einzudämmen, sie wieder unter Kontrolle zu bringen und natürlich die Zunahme der Krankenhauseinweisungen und Krankheiten, die wir gesehen haben, einzudämmen."

Frau Sturgeon sagte, dass die schottische Regierung nach zweiwöchigen Maßnahmen die langfristige Unterdrückung des Virus sicherstellen will.

Das bevorstehende Clampdown wird als "Glücksspiel" angesehen, um zu vermeiden, dass in der Oktoberhälfte eine nationale Sperrung nach schottischem Vorbild für Leistungsschalter durchgeführt werden muss.

Dr. Margaret Harris von der Weltgesundheitsorganisation sagte, Großbritannien sei in Bezug auf den Anstieg der Fälle von Covid-19 nun Vierte der Welt.

Sie sagte gegenüber der Sendung World At One von BBC Radio 4: „Sie sind sicherlich nicht allein.

'Wir sehen weltweit sehr, sehr große Ausbrüche – erst letzte Woche führte Indien die Zahl der Neuerkrankungen an, 504.000, gefolgt von den USA mit 327.000 und dann Brasilien.

"Aber das Vereinigte Königreich ist die Nummer vier, und wir sehen, dass sich insbesondere in Europa in immer mehr Ländern die Anzahl der Fälle stärker ändert."

Auf die Frage, wie Großbritannien im Vergleich zu anderen europäischen Ländern ist, sagte Dr. Harris: „Großbritannien hat letzte Woche 110.827 für uns verzeichnet und Frankreich hat 110.065 gemeldet – Sie sind im Moment im Wesentlichen mit Frankreich gleichgestellt.

'Russland hat ebenso wie Spanien eine große Zahl verzeichnet, aber wir sehen in vielen Ländern Europas Aufwärtstrends, insbesondere in Frankreich und Spanien, aber auch in Italien und weiteren osteuropäischen Ländern.

Zuvor sagte Steve Rotheram, Bürgermeister der Liverpool City Region, dass die Diskussionen über neue Maßnahmen "die ganze Nacht" stattgefunden hätten.

Herr Rotheram machte klar, dass es sein Hauptziel war, mehr Geld zu bekommen, und schlug den Bürgermeister von Manchester, Andy Burnham – normalerweise ein enger Verbündeter -, weil er den Wind angeschrien hatte.

"Wir versuchen zu sehen, ob wir Unterstützung und das Unterstützungspaket für die Unternehmen in unserer Stadtregion erhalten können, die von der Entscheidung der Regierung betroffen sein werden", sagte Rotheram.

Als Prof. Van-Tam heute Morgen in Nr. 10 ankam, zog er seinen Pass aus einer ansonsten leeren Aktentasche hervor

Als Prof. Van-Tam heute Morgen in Nr. 10 ankam, zog er seinen Pass aus einer ansonsten leeren Aktentasche hervor

Prof. Van-Tam warnte davor, dass aufgrund des jüngsten Anstiegs der Fälle bereits mehr Todesfälle und Krankenhausaufenthalte „eingebrannt“ wurden

Prof. Van-Tam warnte davor, dass aufgrund des jüngsten Anstiegs der Fälle bereits mehr Todesfälle und Krankenhausaufenthalte „eingebrannt“ wurden

Covid-19-Fälle weniger als die HÄLFTE von Patrick Vallance und Chris Whittys Doomsday-Vorhersage von 50.000 bis morgen

Die britische Coronavirus-Krise hat die Prognose der Regierung zum Weltuntergang von 50.000 Fällen pro Tag bis morgen weit unterschritten, wie Zahlen zeigen.

Sir Patrick Vallance und Professor Chris Whitty, die wichtigsten wissenschaftlichen und medizinischen Offiziere des Landes, machten im vergangenen Monat die düstere Prognose, als sie die Briten aufforderten, sich angesichts steigender Fälle an neue Sperrkanten zu halten.

Bei der Pressekonferenz im Downing Street TV am 22. September – als es jeden Tag etwa 4.000 Infektionen gab – warnten sie, dass sich die Fallzahlen jede Woche weiter verdoppeln könnten.

Sir Patrick sagte: "Wenn, und das ist ein ziemlich großes Wenn, aber wenn das unvermindert weitergeht und dies alle sieben Tage verdoppelt, würden Sie Mitte Oktober pro Tag etwa 50.000 Fälle haben."

Die jüngsten Zahlen, die gestern veröffentlicht wurden, zeigen jedoch, dass die wahre Flugbahn des Virus weit hinter dem Weltuntergangsszenario zurückgeblieben ist. Das Gesundheitsministerium verzeichnete 12.872 positive Tests.

Covid-19 case numbers are always lower on weekends because of a recording lag, which means the real number of infections on Sunday will probably be slightly higher.

But infections should have been above 40,000, according to the Government's depressing estimates last month. And cases will need to rise by 37,128 within the next 24 hours for Sir Patrick and Professor Whitty's predictions to come true.

The advisers also warned deaths could soon surge past 200 but there were 65 victims yesterday — not even a third of the September forecast.

'We were told we were going into Tier Three, no ifs, no buts. We can either expend energy on that or we can try and get a better deal.

'Some people like to shout at the wind but if they can't change the direction of the wind it is important to shield people from its effects.'

Liverpool mayor Joe Anderson tweeted to say he had been told 'no buts' over what would be imposed on his city.

'Let's be clear that having ignored my pleas for over a month, the Government now blame us, and impose 'lockdown by diktat' without a full financial package and support for businesses we are levelling down not levelling up,' he said.

'We will continue to stand up for our local businesses.'

Politicians from Manchester launched a last-ditch appeal to ministers not to shut all pubs and restaurants in the city and instead hand them the power to only close those which are not meeting coronavirus safety restrictions.

The City Council leader Sir Richard Leese said they have made the case that Greater Manchester should be placed in Tier Two rather than closing pubs and bars.

'They have not been able to show us any data that connects bars and pubs in Greater Manchester with transmission of the Covid-19 virus. They have not been able to provide any evidence that closing them down will work,' he told BBC Radio 4's Today programme.

'We have far more finely-grained data collected by our own directors of public health that seems to demonstrate that there is not a particular connection between bars and restaurants and the transmission of Covid.'

Shadow business minister and Manchester Central MP Lucy Powell called on the Government to publish proof that hospitality venues such as pubs were associated with high risk of coronavirus transmissions.

She tweeted: 'Government and scientists still haven't produced this evidence. The big problem for them is local leaders have all the same data (in fact better data for their areas) and they know hospitality settings make up a very small proportion of infection transmission.'

Manchester City Council leader Sir Richard Leese said local officials are still in discussions with the Government as to what restrictions should apply in the area.

He said they have made the case that Greater Manchester should be placed in Tier 2 rather than the stricter Tier 3 which could mean closing pubs and bars.

'They have not been able to show us any data that connects bars and pubs in Greater Manchester with transmission of the Covid-19 virus. They have not been able to provide any evidence that closing them down will work,' he told BBC Radio 4's Today programme.

'We have far more finely-grained data collected by our own directors of public health that seems to demonstrate that there is not a particular connection between bars and restaurants and the transmission of Covid.'

Liverpool had the second highest rate of infection in England in the 14 days leading up to October 4, with 4,593 confirmed cases (928.2 per 100,000 people). The neighboring borough of Knowsley had the worst rate with 1,412 cases and an infection rate of 944.

A Downing Street spokesman said: 'Our primary focus has always been to protect lives and livelihoods while controlling the spread of the virus and these measures will help achieve that aim.

“We must do everything we can to protect the NHS and to ensure that it can continue to provide the essential services that so many people rely on.

"This is a critical point and it is absolutely essential that everyone follows the clear guidelines we have put in place to contain the virus."

Revellers leave the pubs after closing time in Liverpool city centre after enjoying the last weekend before COVID restrictions are expected to force pubs and bars close in the area

Revellers leave the pubs after closing time in Liverpool city centre after enjoying the last weekend before COVID restrictions are expected to force pubs and bars close in the area

Number 10 stressed the extent of discussions with local leaders over the weekend following criticism from some Northern authorities and mayors that not enough consultation had taken place since the Covid crisis began.

Downing Street said senior Number 10 advisers and Communities Secretary Robert Jenrick held discussions local authority chiefs and mayors from 'the highest areas of concern'.

The local authorities also expressed concern about the impact of harsher restrictions on their own finances, with the statement saying they are existing 'hand to mouth'.

It said: '(We) are currently unable to plan for the medium or long-term.

'A clearer funding settlement must be achieved that enables us to forward plan, continue to deliver essential public services, avoid large scale redundancies for Local Authority key workers and set a budget for next year with confidence.

'Therefore, we are seeking assurance from Treasury that, in coming to that national position, no local authorities placed on Tier 3 measures will be put in a position where they are unable to balance their budget this year or cannot set a legal budget next year.

'In this respect we have agreed that a further discussion with Treasury will take place on this matter.'

Life in three-tier Britain: All your questions answered on restrictions for Medium, High and Very High risk areas

The Prime Minister today divide the country into 'medium', 'high' or 'very high' coronavirus alert sectors amid a tightening of lockdown rules that could last until Christmas.

The three-tier system comes after a 9.3 percent increase in cases on the previous week, with parts of northern England having the worst rates of infection.

Deputy chief medical officer Jonathan Van-Tam and NHS medical director Stephen Powis told a briefing in Downing Street this morning that the number of patients in hospital was now higher than before the blanket lockdown was imposed in March – and could be above the previous peak within four weeks.

Professor Van-Tam also delivered a stark message that the surge in cases was spreading from younger people to the more vulnerable old generation.

And Prof Powys said the hope that the elderly could be isolated from the increase in infections was proving to be 'wishful thinking'.

Here MailOnline outlines what the tiers mean and who they could affect:

LEVEL ONE

Tier 1 restrictions are believed to mirror those that already exist across England.

These include the rule of six, a curfew at 10 p.m., group sports that can only be played outdoors, and a maximum of 15 guests at wedding ceremonies.

ANIMAL TWO

Tier 2 restrictions are expected to be similar to what is currently in force in Middlesbrough and Hartlepool, which prohibit indoor mixing in households.

Two households are allowed to meet in a private garden as long as the rule of six and social distancing is observed.

ANIMAL THREE

Locals are only allowed to leave their areas for important trips such as work, education or health and must return before the end of the day.

Overnight stays by people outside of these high-risk areas are also prohibited, reports The Sun.

Households are expected not to mix indoors or outdoors.

As of 5 p.m. on Wednesday, hundreds of pubs in the northwest will be closed, The Telegraph reports.

According to the BBC, restaurants are only available for take-out and bookmakers, casinos, gyms, beauty salons and hairdressers could close.

These measures are expected to be imposed for four weeks before being reviewed.

If a business is closed due to third tier restrictions, the Government will pay two thirds of each employee's salary, up to a maximum of £2,100 a month under plans set out by Rishi Sunak last Thursday.

WHO IS GOING INTO TIER THREE LOCKDOWN?

The Government has not yet confirmed revealed which areas will go into the strictest lockdown.

But politicians inLiverpool said they expected to be put in Tier Three, subject to the most draconian restrictions, including shutting pubs and banning households from mixing from 5pm on Wednesday.

Other parts of the North West including Manchester could follow. Dr Jane Eddleston, medical lead in Greater Manchester, told the briefing: 'The North West has about 40 per cent of all Covid cases at the moment and this is proving very challenging for us.

'Within Greater Manchester, we have seen a threefold increase in the number of patients admitted to intensive care in the last five weeks and an eightfold increase in the number of patients admitted to our hospitals.

'The situation at the moment is that 30 per cent of our critical care beds are taken up with patients with Covid and this is starting to impact on the services we provide for other patients.'

The decision will be based on the rate of infection.

Nottingham leads in England, with 2,763 new cases recorded in the seven days to October 8 – the equivalent of 830.0 cases per 100,000 people.

This is a huge jump from 314.5 per 100,000 in the seven days to October 1.

Nottingham City Council expects a local lockdown to be imposed on Monday, with councils in the area asking residents to not mix with people outside of their households or bubbles.

Knowsley has the second highest rate, which has climbed from 485.9 to 669.5, with 1,010 new cases.

Neighbouring Liverpool is in third place, where the rate has increased from 504.4 to 598.5, with 2,981 new cases.

Other areas recording big jumps in their seven-day rates which may lead to restrictions include West Lancashire (up from 217.8 to 398.1, with 455 new cases); Exeter (up from 229.8 to 380.5, with 500 new cases); Blackburn with Darwen (up from 208.4 to 355.4, with 532 new cases); and Broxtowe (up from 115.8 to 265.7, with 303 new cases).

WHAT HAPPENS NEXT?

The Prime Minister chaired a meeting of the Government's COBR committee this morning to finalise the scheme, and will give a statement in the Commons at around 3.30pm

In a statement today, seven local leaders from Merseyside including Metro mayor Steve Rotheram and Liverpool City mayor Joe Anderson said they had been told pubs, bars, betting shops, casinos, adult gaming centres and gyms would all have to close.

They said that they had made clear the support on offer – including the job support scheme announced by Chancellor Rishi Sunak for the Government to pay up to two thirds of the salaries of staff in businesses ordered to close – was inadequate.

Mr Rotheram said there was little they could do to challenge the decision, but that discussions had been continuing through the night on an improved support package.

'We were told we were going into Tier 3, no ifs, no buts. We can either expend energy on that or we can try and get a better deal,' he told the BBC Radio 4 Today programme.

'Some people like to shout at the wind but if they can't change the direction of the wind it is important to shield people from its effects.'

Mr Anderson said on Twitter that leaders had been told restaurants would not have to close under the new restrictions.

He said: 'To be clear the Government agreed with CA leaders and me that restaurants can continue to stay open across the city and region till 10.30 pm.'

In Manchester, City Council leader Sir Richard Leese said local leaders were still in discussions with the Government as to what restrictions should apply in the area.

Despite high levels of infections, he said they had made the case that Greater Manchester should be placed in Tier 2 as there was little evidence that pubs and bars had been responsible for the spread of the disease in the area.

'They have not been able to show us any data that connects bars and pubs in Greater Manchester with transmission of the Covid-19 virus. They have not been able to provide any evidence that closing them down will work,' he told the Today programme.

'We have far more finely-grained data collected by our own directors of public health that seems to demonstrate that there is not a particular connection between bars and restaurants and the transmission of Covid.'

This evening Mr Johnson will host a press conference at Downing Street where he will be joined by Chancellor Rishi Sunak and England's chief medical officer Professor Chris Whitty.

Downing Street said MPs will be asked to debate and vote on the three-tier measures next week.

WHAT HAS THE RESPONSE BEEN?

Many of the local political leaders in the areas likely to face the harshest restrictions were in discussions with the Government over the extent of the lockdown and financial support available.

They fear that Rishi Sunak's Job Support Scheme (JSS) upgrade announced last week to cover 67 per cent of wages will not be enough and want something closer to the 80 per cent paid out by the soon-to-end furlough programme.

Culture Secretary Oliver Dowden denied that ministers had been 'panicked' into imposing economically damaging new measures at a time when deaths from Covid-19 were relatively low compared to the start of the pandemic.

While he said that he hoped controls would be able to be eased, he acknowledged that they may be required to remain in place until Christmas and beyond.

'The purpose of doing this is to ensure we get the virus under control so by the time that we get through to after Christmas we are in that position where it is under control,' he told Sky News.

'Indeed I hope it will be sooner than that.'

St Helens Council leader David Baines said the level of restrictions and the detail of businesses which would be forced to close were 'not up for negotiation' with the Government.

In a statement, he said: 'Government had decided this already and were adamant that they wanted to keep education, retail and the majority of workplaces open, giving us the indication that all other settings were chosen for closure by default.

'There is no scientific evidence we have been given that shows the areas told to close are a higher risk than others.

'We still do not know the full list of businesses and settings that will be told to close.

'It was suggested in one call with senior Government officials at the weekend that pubs that serve ''substantial meals'' may be allowed to stay open, but I can't confirm this.'

He said leaders had asked for details on the thresholds for each tier but no details had been given so far.

Meanwhile, the night-time economy adviser for Greater Manchester, Sacha Lord, has started legal proceedings to challenge the lockdown of hospitality and entertainment venues.

Mr Dowden made clear the Government would resist any legal action, insisting ministers were supported by chief scientific adviser Sir Patrick Vallance.

'We know there are challenges around hospitality – for example, the obvious point you can't wear a mask when you are sat down and eating, that frequently you are in contact with people that you don't normally meet, and we know that the virus thrives on that kind of social interaction,' he told the BBC Radio 4 Today programme.

He said the Government had to act now amid clear evidence the disease was on the rise again.

Graph by graph: What the data presented today REALLY show

"Second high point" of the falls since summer – but not comparable to April

Professor Jonathan Van-Tam, England's assistant chief physician, held a televised briefing today to warn that hospital admissions and deaths from Covid-19 will increase over the next few weeks

Professor Jonathan Van-Tam, England's assistant chief physician, held a televised briefing today to warn that hospital admissions and deaths from Covid-19 will increase over the next few weeks

The first graph presented by assistant chief physician Professor Jonathan Van-Tam was the well-known daily count of positive coronavirus tests over time.

It shows a dramatic increase in cases in September and October after a summer hiatus, showing that the virus is recovering in the UK.

Health Department test data shows that in the last week of July, when the virus appeared to have been pushed into filing over the summer, an average of 753 people were diagnosed with Covid-19 every day.

Daily cases hit a low of 352 on July 6, when there have been fewer cases than ever since the public testing system was in place.

However, by September 24, the average number of daily infections had risen to 4,964 per day, and now, in the second week of October, there have been more than 12,000 cases per day for the past nine consecutive days.

Dr. Van-Tam acknowledged, however, that the government graph is an "apple-pear comparison" and could be misleading when viewed year-round.

As a result, the spike now appears larger in cases than the one the country put on lockdown in the spring, which is inaccurate.

The first hump of cases, seen in March, April and May, came at a time when there was no public testing system for many weeks, and when one was put in place, fewer than 30,000 tests were being done a day by the end of April .

This meant that the criteria for testing had to be stricter, and the most critically ill patients had to be recorded, not people with mild illnesses.

By comparison, around 230,000 tests are currently performed every day, most of which are negative.

Dr. Van-Tam said, “If you are comparing (the first peak) to the second peak, please remember that this is an apple and pear comparison based on case numbers as our testing capacity in the spring was much lower than it is now .

"But the crucial point is that after a rather flat summer with very few Covid-positive patients in Great Britain, a clear climax can be recorded from the beginning of September."

This slide shows how the number of positive coronavirus tests in the UK has increased since a summer hiatus. The second tip doesn't compare to the first, as there are so many more tests being done now than it was then

This slide shows how the number of positive coronavirus tests in the UK has increased since a summer hiatus. The second tip doesn't compare to the first, as there are so many more tests being done now than it was then

The outbreak was concentrated in the north of England but extended south.

Dr. Van-Tam presented a series of maps showing how the second wave of the coronavirus is concentrating on the north of England.

This confirms what official data has been showing for weeks and makes it clear that the hardest-hit parts of the country are in the Manchester and Liverpool region, as well as Newcastle and Sunderland.

Dark spots on the map show a higher number of Covid-19 cases per person (purple map) and outbreaks that are increasing faster from week to week (brown map).

Dr. Van-Tam said: “There are now very dark areas in the North West of England, in the North East of England, and indeed a confluent dark purple color in the northern part of Britain that extends into the West Midlands and the East Midlands. & # 39;

He added: 'Of greater concern (stats on the brown map) is the latest data on where things are warming up …

“You can see that the range of the dark brown colors is further south on a larger landmass across England, and in fact I received these slides this morning – I showed very similar dates to MPs in the House of Lords on Friday and Friday brown map hadn't extended that far south.

"So it changed within a few days, and that is clearly a concern of mine."

Weekly data from Public Health England on Friday showed that 18 of the 19 areas with a coronavirus infection rate of more than 250 cases per 100,000 people (0.25 percent) are in the north of the country, with the exception of Nottingham.

The vast majority of areas with local lockdown rules are in the north and there are no regional restrictions further south than the Midlands.

Knowsley in Merseyside was the worst hit area on Friday October 9, with 557 cases of Covid-19 per 100,000 people – meaning one in 180 people is infected.

It was followed by Manchester (532 per 100,000), Liverpool (517) and Newcastle (475).

The fastest growth rate in the first week of October was recorded in Nottingham, where cases rose almost seven-fold from 62 per 100,000 to 424 in one week, making it the fifth worst hit in the country.

There have also been rapid climbs more than triple that in areas outside of the northern hotspot including Devon, Suffolk, Torbay, Brighton and Richmond upon Thames.

Mapped coronavirus infection rates show cases are concentrated in the north of England, but the outbreak is spreading south, Professor Van-Tam said. (Pictured: Areas with the darkest spots are hardest hit. The purple map on the left shows the number of coronavirus cases per 100,000. The brown map on the right shows the change in the infection rate between the last week of September and the first week of October)

Mapped coronavirus infection rates show cases are concentrated in the north of England, but the outbreak is spreading south, Professor Van-Tam said. (Pictured: Areas with the darkest spots are hardest hit. The purple map on the left shows the number of coronavirus cases per 100,000. The brown map on the right shows the change in the infection rate between the last week of September and the first week of October)

Cases highest in teenagers and 20-year-olds, but these move into older risk groups

Separate maps and thermal diagrams from Dr. Van-Tam showed how cases are increasing in the elderly in areas with severe outbreaks.

During the second wave, resurrection cases were limited to young people, with infection rates highest in people aged 20 and over, followed by teenagers.

Much of the surge in cases is due to student returns to school and university, and up to seven times as many people are infected in student areas as in other parts of the country.

At the beginning, increasing infections in young people weren't a big problem, as they were much less likely to die from Covid-19 and young school children apparently no longer had cases.

But in the worst-hit areas – as head physician Professor Chris Whitty warned at the last television review – infections have now crept into older groups.

Dr. Van-Tam said today: Our case recurrence this fall was mostly seen in adults aged 20-29, and that is absolutely true. & # 39;

The deputy chief physician showed cases with cases from people aged 60 and over and explained, “You can see that the spread from these younger age groups to the age group over 60 has occurred in the northwest and in the northeast and there are rates of change in the same place, but also extend a little further south.

"This is again of great importance … because older people with Covid-19 naturally have a much worse course. They are hospitalized for long periods of time and are more difficult to rescue. & # 39;

Last week's PHE report showed that infection rates are highest in 10–19 year olds – at 237 cases per 100,000 people – followed by 20–29 year olds (200).

They are significantly lower in the older age groups, with rates of 62 for those in their 60s, 39 per 100,000 for people in their 70s, and 53 for the 80+ group.

Among those at risk over 60, cases are increasing in areas with severe outbreaks, top medics warned, meaning hospital admissions in those areas will increase. The same trend is likely to continue across the country, they said (Image: Areas with the darkest spots are hardest hit. The purple map on the left shows the number of coronavirus cases per 100,000. The brown map on the right shows the change in infection rate between the last week of September and the first week of October)

Among those at risk over 60, cases are increasing in areas with severe outbreaks, top medics warned, meaning hospital admissions in those areas will increase. The same trend is likely to continue across the country, they said (Image: Areas with the darkest spots are hardest hit. The purple map on the left shows the number of coronavirus cases per 100,000. The brown map on the right shows the change in infection rate between the last week of September and the first week of October)

Although these age groups have lower rates, they have increased at about the same rate as younger people.

Rates may be lower because older people are more aware of the personal risks they face and are more likely to keep social distance and protect themselves at home.

In the month ending October 4, the infection rate in people in their 60s more than tripled from 21 cases per 100,000 to 62.

That 199 percent increase was close to the 221 percent increase in the 20 to 29 age group, where the infection rate rose from 62 to 199.5 over the same period.

While increasing cases in the under 30s may not directly increase the death toll, it does increase the data rate in the elderly, as data shows, which will inevitably lead to deaths.

On a series of heat charts, Dr. Van-Tam said that the cases in the northwest, although they only appeared to grow in 16-29 year olds in early September, quickly spread to older, at-risk age groups.

This heat map shows how infection rates have changed in different age groups since the beginning of September. Age groups are listed horizontally, with the oldest for each region at the top and the data running at the bottom. The darkening of a box shows that the infections are increasing. When the dark boxes move up, it means cases are increasing in vulnerable older age groups

This heat map shows how infection rates have changed in different age groups since the beginning of September. Age groups are listed horizontally, with the oldest for each region at the top and the data running at the bottom. The darkening of a box shows that the infections are increasing. When the dark boxes move up, it means cases are increasing in vulnerable older age groups

The trend was most evident in the northwest, emphasized Professor Van-Tam, where most infections (dark orange boxes) were concentrated in younger groups (lower rows) in early September but have continued to move up since then, meaning older people have it are let infected

The trend was most evident in the northwest, emphasized Professor Van-Tam, where most infections (dark orange boxes) were concentrated in younger groups (lower rows) in early September but have continued to move up since then, meaning older people have it are let infected

The diagonal line broadly shows that infection rates in younger people are now occurring in older groups in early September, which means hospital admissions and deaths are likely to increase

The diagonal line broadly shows that infection rates in younger people are now occurring in older groups in early September, which means hospital admissions and deaths are likely to increase

More patients in hospital than before the first lockdown and increasing admissions

Professor Stephen Powis, NHS England Medical Director, flanked Dr. Van-Tam to warn the public that hospital admissions are increasing.

More people are now in hospital than before the UK lockdown in the spring, says Professor Powis.

Statistics show that on March 23, the day Boris Johnson made his landmark address to the nation, there were 3,097 patients in hospitals in England with coronavirus.

That number was exceeded on Saturday when the number of people on the wards reached 3,225 and it is now at least 3,451.

However, the rate of increase in March was immense – the number of patients tripled in just one week to 10,767 on March 30th.

At the current rate of increase, it took three weeks, according to the government, for the number of patients in the hospital to triple from 1,141 on September 20.

Daily admissions are significantly lower today than they were then, but are increasing as the number of cases continues to rise in the UK.

There are currently an average of 487 admissions per day in England, compared to around 1,049 daily in the first week of lockdown and more than 2,700 at peak.

Professor Powis said, “You have been seeing this surge in infections in the community since early September … we are starting to see a surge in hospital cases.

"It is clear that hospital admissions are rising fastest in areas of the country where infection rates are highest … especially in the northwest, where hospital cases are growing the fastest and most."

The hospital admissions charts show that while cases are high in young people and low in older people, the opposite is true for hospital cases.

In the week leading up to October 4, nearly 40 over 85-year-olds were hospitalized with Covid-19 every day, compared with an average of fewer than five under 65-year-olds.

In addition to a clear age difference, there are regional differences in hospital stays that are not shown in the graphics.

Of the 3,451 hospital patients recorded yesterday, 2,132 are in the Northwest, Northeast and Yorkshire regions alone (62 percent).

In the week leading up to October 4, nearly 40 over 85-year-olds were hospitalized with Covid-19 every day, compared with an average of fewer than five under 65-year-olds

In the week leading up to October 4, nearly 40 over 85-year-olds were hospitalized with Covid-19 every day, compared with an average of fewer than five under 65-year-olds

NHS England Medical Director Professor Stephen Powis said: “It is clear that hospital admissions are rising fastest in the areas of the country where infection rates are highest ... especially the North West where you can see that hospital cases accelerate the fastest and are highest & # 39;

NHS England Medical Director Professor Stephen Powis said: “It is clear that hospital admissions are rising fastest in the areas of the country where infection rates are highest … especially the North West where you can see that hospital cases accelerate the fastest and are highest & # 39;

Hospital cases are currently concentrated in the north of England, where daily admissions are above the national average, as this graph shows. Separate government data shows that of the 3,451 hospital patients recorded yesterday, 2,132 are in the Northwest and Northeast and Yorkshire regions alone (62 percent).

Hospital cases are currently concentrated in the north of England, where daily admissions are above the national average, as this graph shows. Separate government data shows that of the 3,451 hospital patients recorded yesterday, 2,132 are in the Northwest and Northeast and Yorkshire regions alone (62 percent).

Liverpool University Hospitals NHS Trust currently has the highest number of coronavirus patients of any hospital in England, data shows

Liverpool University Hospitals NHS Trust currently has the highest number of coronavirus patients of any hospital in England, data shows

Time delays mean hospital cases and deaths now relate to a time with fewer cases. both will increase in the coming weeks

While warning of an increasing number of people being hospitalized with Covid-19, chief physicians emphasized the point that there is a delay in the records.

On average, it takes a seriously ill coronavirus patient about seven to ten days to develop coronavirus and require hospital care.

Once in the hospital, they typically spend anywhere from five to 23 days on wards until they have recovered enough to go home or die. Some patients stay longer while others recover or die faster than the average.

Around one in three people hospitalized with Covid-19 has so far died of the disease in England.

Because of the time delays, it can take a month or more for someone to discover the virus and then die. Therefore, the increasing number of cases (an average of 14,000 diagnosed per day, plus others not tested) may not lead to an apparent increase in deaths by mid-November.

"I would like to make it very clear to you that patients with Covid-19 do not go to the hospital straight away," said Professor Van-Tam.

“And they don't die in the hospital once they arrive. Unfortunately, some die – but not immediately.

"The point I want to make here is that there is a delay between cases and when hospital admissions go up and when deaths go up."

He added, "Hospital admissions we actually have now in relation to a time when there were fewer cases of Covid-19 and what I'm trying to say here is that we've already baked additional ones with the cases we know of have hospital admissions and unfortunately we also burned in additional deaths that are now due to infections that have already occurred. & # 39;

On average, it takes a seriously ill coronavirus patient about seven to ten days to develop coronavirus and require hospital care. Once in the hospital, they typically spend anywhere from five to 23 days on wards until they have recovered enough to go home or die. Some patients stay for longer, while others recover or die faster than the average period

On average, it takes a seriously ill coronavirus patient about seven to ten days to develop coronavirus and require hospital care. Once in the hospital, they typically spend anywhere from five to 23 days on wards until they have recovered enough to go home or die. Some patients stay for longer, while others recover or die faster than the average period

Risk of coronavirus death in hospital is FALLING: Treatment helps intensive care fatalities drop to 20%, new figures reveal

The chances of survival of the coronavirus after a serious illness have increased significantly since the pandemic began, data shows.

Scientists say that with improved treatment, the death rate among the most critically ill patients has fallen by nearly a third since the peak.

The numbers were also supported by more extensive testing that found a greater number of less serious cases.

The proportion of patients who die in intensive care units in hospitals has fallen from around 30 percent to less than 20 percent since April.

Even more noticeable is the decline in the death rate in relation to all hospitalized patients – from 6 percent at its peak to around 2 percent.

The proportion of patients who die in intensive care units in hospitals has fallen from around 30 percent to less than 20 percent since April. The fall in the death rate as a proportion of all patients admitted to hospital is even more striking ¿ plummeting from 6 per cent at the peak to around 2 per cent now

The proportion of patients who die in intensive care units in hospitals has fallen from around 30 percent to less than 20 percent since April. The fall in the death rate as a proportion of all patients admitted to hospital is even more striking – plummeting from 6 per cent at the peak to around 2 per cent now

Professor Peter Horby has welcomed the "good news" that the proportion of Covid 19 patients who die in hospital has fallen dramatically since April

Professor Peter Horby has welcomed the "good news" that the proportion of Covid 19 patients who die in hospital has fallen dramatically since April

Professor Peter Horby, a member of the Government's Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies, welcomed the 'good news' amid rising case numbers.

He said increased testing and tracing capabilities combined with a 'much better understanding of the disease' has led to death rates among the sickest dropping to a less than a fifth.

'What's great to see is that it is the risk of death in hospitalised patients is coming down,' he told the BBC's Andrew Marr Show.

Government data shows that the North West, North East and Yorkshire are the only regions where the number of people being hospitalized has increased steadily and sharply (line charts show daily hospital admissions between April and October).

Government data shows that the North West, North East and Yorkshire are the only regions where the number of people being hospitalized has increased steadily and sharply (line charts show daily hospital admissions between April and October).

'It was pretty high at about 25 to 30 per cent in the last wave. And although the data are preliminary, it looks like it's coming down and may be below 20 per cent so that's something that is good news.'

Experts agree that treatment breakthroughs have had the biggest impact on the death rate of people with coronavirus.

Dexamethasone, a widely used steroid that costs about 50p a day, was found to reduce deaths by a third in the sickest patients.

The antiviral drug Remdesivir, originally developed to fight Ebola, has also been found to improve recovery time in sick patients.

Every eighth Londoner is immune to coronavirus: up to 13% of the capital's residents now have Covid antibodies – while other regions only account for 1%

London could be protected from the worst second wave of coronavirus as one in eight people in the capital developed antibodies.

There is growing optimism that the number of cases in Britain's largest city is not rising rapidly, as a higher percentage of residents have become immune to the virus than any other region.

Current data from Public Health England show a prevalence of SARS-Cov-2 antibodies in blood donors of up to 13.4 percent.

The numbers from London contrast with the rest of the country, with the North East and Yorkshire having a prevalence of 3.9 percent and the South West region having a prevalence of 3.5 percent.

And in the northwest, which was largely locally locked last month, the prevalence in the latest numbers was 6.8 percent, suggesting that more people have produced antibodies due to the high rates of infection in the area.

The rate of antibodies in the population varies over time, and government advisors believe that up to 20 percent of the capital's residents could be immune to the virus, according to the Sunday Times.

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