ENTERTAINMENT

Coronavirus UK: 15 deaths in the provisional daily death toll


The number of people diagnosed with coronavirus in the UK has fallen again today as health chiefs recorded just 812 more cases of the life-threatening disease and 16 new deaths.

Health Department statistics show 1,043 Brits now test positive for Covid-19 every day, with the seven-day moving average having declined every day since then – dispelling growing second-wave fears.

Daily infections had risen steadily since the beginning of July after “Super Saturday” – the first major loosening of the lockdown, which top scientists had warned against, would inevitably trigger an increase in certain cases. They doubled in a month, hitting a six-week high of 1,094 on August 15th.

Troubling numbers from the UK and Boris Johnson hit the brake pedal late last month and signs that the virus was on the rise again in Europe shocked Boris Johnson. Casinos, bowling alleys and beauticians were finally allowed to reopen this week after No. 10 became confident that Britain is not headed for another crisis reminiscent of the darkest days of the first wave in April.

Neither hospital admissions nor deaths – two other methods health bosses use to track the disease – ever rose in line with cases, giving experts confidence that infections were only ever on the rise as more testing was done in badly affected areas like the northwest were.

Data showing the virus is on the decline is likely to reassure ministers that the UK can cope with the infection through local whack-a-mole-style lockdowns in trouble spots, easing further coronavirus control measures and the country may return to some normalcy before winter.

The UK today recorded 16 more laboratory-confirmed coronavirus deaths – the official death toll rose to 41,397. In contrast, 12 deaths were reported across the UK yesterday and 20 deaths last Wednesday. An average of ten infected patients succumb to the disease every day.

In other coronavirus developments in the UK today:

  • Matt Hancock suggested that there is no excuse for people not to return to offices as he said that only "relatively small" numbers caught coronavirus in their workplace;
  • The health minister promised to introduce mass testing for the public – but did not offer a timeframe and called it "a moon shot" after months of demands for population-wide surveillance.
  • Fears that Greece and Croatia could be put on the UK's quarantine list were sparked after numbers showed that both popular travel destinations saw spikes in confirmed coronavirus cases.
  • Boris Johnson was asked to end his vacation in Scotland early to return to Downing Street and take on the government's educational problems when Tory MPs warned ministers that they were being "laughed at".
  • The closure of Oldham would destroy the city's already crippled economy. Three Labor MPs have warned that Greater Manchester is on the verge of being hit by tougher measures.
  • Diners using the Eat Out to Help Out program have been rated "rude" by overworked staff as the number of half-price meals sold under Rishi Sunak's plan reaches 35 million.

MATT HANCOCK RECOMMENDS THAT PEOPLE DO NOT be excused for not returning to their desk

Matt Hancock suggested today that there is no excuse for people not to return to offices as he said only "relatively small" numbers have caught coronavirus in their workplace.

The Minister of Health said official data showed that the disease is "passed on to a very large extent" when one household meets another "normally in one of their homes".

He said household transmission was "at the root of the spread of this virus in this country".

Mr Hancock took the floor after being asked if the UK would follow France's lead by requiring face masks to be worn in all workplaces.

The new rules in France come into force on September 1st and require the wearing of face covers in all shared and closed work areas, including open plan and shared offices.

The Minister of Health said: "We are not thinking about it right now."

The latest state coronavirus death toll, released yesterday afternoon, was 41,381. It takes into account victims who died within 28 days of testing positive.

Ministers removed the original death toll two weeks ago because they feared it was inaccurate because it was not limited in time, which means that no one in England can technically recover.

More than 5,000 deaths were deducted from the original toll. The rolling average number of daily coronavirus deaths fell dramatically.

Before the original count was dropped, around 59 deaths were reported daily. It's only ten now. Few changes were made to the numbers during the brunt of the crisis in April.

The death dates do not indicate how many Covid-19 patients have died within the last 24 hours. It's just how many deaths have been reported and registered with the authorities.

And the number doesn't always match the home country updates.

Health Department officials are working on a different time limit which means the daily updates from Scotland and Northern Ireland are out of sync.

The toll announced daily by NHS England, which only takes into account deaths in hospitals, does not match the DH numbers as they use a different recording system.

For example, some deaths announced by chiefs of the NHS England have already been counted by the Department of Health, which records deaths "as soon as they become available".

Health Department officials also declare new Covid-19 cases every afternoon. Yesterday they revealed that another 1,089 Brits had tested positive for the life-threatening disease.

That means around 1,071 Britons are diagnosed with the disease every day – a number that has decreased for three days in a row after rising consistently for over a month.

The numbers might reassure ministers that the easing of lockdown readings has so far not sparked a wave of cases that some infectious disease scientists have warned was inevitable.

HEALTH SECRETARY vows to conduct population-wide mass tests

Matt Hancock today promised to conduct population-wide mass coronavirus testing – but did not offer a timeframe and called the project a "moon shot".

The Minister of Health told the BBC's Today program that the government would conduct mass tests and that ministers would work as soon as possible on the program that is vital to further return to normal.

His promise follows months of appeals from top experts and politicians to set up a mass test program. Former Prime Minister Tony Blair warned that this was the only way to prevent a second wave and said Britain “ran out of time” to get a program up and running.

But Mr Hancock was vague about details when he revealed the government was trying new tests, saying some give results in as little as 10 minutes and rely on saliva – to avoid the need for long swabs to stick down their throats . Current tests can take several days to produce results as they need to be sent to laboratories.

Around 100,000 people are tested for coronavirus every day – but scientists have warned it will have to be scaled up massively to deal with the coughs and colds that will hit this winter.

Mass tests allow ministers to see exactly where outbreaks are and prevent infected people from unwittingly spreading them. Fast coronavirus tests can also mean that travelers don't have to quarantine for the entire two weeks if they come back negative.

You might even encourage the government to relax existing rules even further if the trend continues.

Concerns that the virus was recovering prompted Boris Johnson last month to hit the brake pedal, delaying the reopening of parts of the economy by a fortnight.

The data shows that most infected patients show no symptoms, which means they will never be tested. This means that the cases published daily by the government are not an accurate measure of the true extent of the crisis.

Separate data released each week by the ONS – based on random swab tests done by thousands of people – suggests that around 3,800 people are infected every day in England alone.

Separate promising data released yesterday showed that deaths from Covid-19 in England and Wales have hit another low point and that flu and pneumonia are now killing six times as many people.

Latest data from the Office of National Statistics (ONS) showed that 1,013 people died of viral diseases in the week leading up to August 7 in England and Wales, compared with 152 patients who lost their lives to coronavirus.

In contrast, during the darkest days of the crisis in April, there were nearly 9,000 deaths a week attributed to Covid-19 and only 2,000 from flu and pneumonia.

The 152 registered deaths from coronavirus last week are down by a fifth from 193 last week and represent the lowest number of casualties in 20 weeks – before Britain was locked down in late March.

In other developments today, Matt Hancock suggested that there is no excuse for people not to return to offices because only a "relatively small" number has caught coronavirus in their workplace.

The Minister of Health said official data showed that the disease is "passed on to a very large extent" when one household meets another "normally in one of their homes".

Mr Hancock responded after being asked if the UK would follow France's lead by requiring face masks to be worn in all workplaces. He said, "We're not thinking about it right now."

The new rules in France come into force on September 1st and require the wearing of face covers in all shared and closed work areas, including open plan and shared offices.

Mr Hancock also promised today to conduct population-wide mass coronavirus testing but did not offer a time frame and referred to the project as a "moon shot".

He told the BBC's Today program that the government would conduct mass tests and that ministers would work as soon as possible on the program that was critical to further return to normal.

His promise follows months of appeals from top experts and politicians to set up a mass test program.

MPS WARN LOCKING DOWN OLDHAM MAY & # 39; DESTRUCT THE LOCAL ECONOMY & # 39;

The government will decide whether to order the closure of the city of Greater Manchester's bars, restaurants and gyms on Thursday. Greater Manchester, Blackburn with Darwen, Burnley, Hyndburn, Pendle, Rossendale, Bradford, Calderdale, Kirklees and Preston are closed

The government will decide whether to order the closure of the city of Greater Manchester's bars, restaurants and gyms on Thursday. Greater Manchester, Blackburn with Darwen, Burnley, Hyndburn, Pendle, Rossendale, Bradford, Calderdale, Kirklees and Preston are closed

Closing Oldham would destroy the city's already crippled economy, three Labor MPs warned in a letter to Matt Hancock.

Oldham West MP Jim McMahon, Debbie Abrahams MP from Oldham East, and Angela Rayner, Labor's new vice chairman, have urged the health secretary to avoid a "blunt lockdown" that will "cost more job losses".

They claim there is "no evidence" that more people are actually getting the virus, and blaming increasing infection rates for more widespread testing.

Despite strict rules banning separate households from meeting indoors last month, Oldham has seen twice as many infections in the past seven days. Around 107.5 people per 100,000 population now contract the viral disease every week, according to the latest data from Public Health England.

Cases are also increasing in dozen of counties across England, including Swindon, Northampton, and the Nottinghamshire county of Newark and Sherwood.

Mr Hancock will decide tomorrow whether to reverse restrictive measures in the city of Greater Manchester, which this week became the UK's new Covid hotspot.

New rules could close Oldham's bars, restaurants and gyms that were financially paralyzed by the initial lockdown and have been adjusted for months to ensure that they are "Covid-safe" and can be reopened.

Former Prime Minister Tony Blair warned that this was the only way to prevent a second wave and said the UK "ran out of time" to get a program up and running.

But Mr Hancock was vague about details when he revealed that the government was trying new tests, saying some give results in as little as 10 minutes and rely on saliva – to avoid the need for long swabs to stick down their throats . Current tests can take several days to produce results as they need to be sent to laboratories.

Around 100,000 people are tested for coronavirus every day – but scientists have warned it will have to be scaled up massively to deal with the coughs and colds that will hit this winter.

Mass tests allow ministers to see exactly where outbreaks are and prevent infected people from unwittingly spreading them.

Fast coronavirus tests can also mean that travelers don't have to quarantine for the entire two weeks if they come back negative.

There were renewed fears today that Greece and Croatia could be added to the UK's quarantine list as both popular destinations saw spikes in confirmed coronavirus cases.

Both nations have seen a boom over the past week, posting cases this morning that almost hit their peak in August.

A decision to align them with other nations like Spain, Portugal and France could be made by Friday to destroy the vacation plans of thousands more Britons.

Mr Hancock also said ministers are working with Heathrow Airport to find a way for coronavirus testing to cut the quarantine period.

On other developments today, three Labor MPs warned that the Oldham lockdown would destroy the city's already crippled economy.

Oldham West MP Jim McMahon, Debbie Abrahams MP from Oldham East, and Angela Rayner, Labor's new vice chairman, have urged the health minister to avoid a “blunt lockdown” that will “cost more job losses”.

In a letter to Mr. Hancock, they claim there is "no evidence" that more people are actually getting the virus and that the increasing rates of infection are attributed to more extensive testing.

Despite strict rules prohibiting separate households from meeting indoors in the past month, Oldham has seen twice as many infections in the past seven days.

Around 107.5 people per 100,000 population now contract the viral disease every week, according to the latest data from Public Health England.

Cases are also increasing in dozen of counties across England, including Swindon, Northampton, and the Nottinghamshire county of Newark and Sherwood.

Mr Hancock will decide tomorrow whether to reverse restrictive measures in the city of Greater Manchester, which this week became the UK's new Covid hotspot.

New rules could close Oldham's bars, restaurants and gyms that were financially paralyzed by the initial lockdown and have been adjusted for months to ensure that they are "Covid-safe" and can be reopened.

How many people really died from COVID-19 in the UK?

Ministry of Health (no closing date): 46,952

The Department of Health's daily data does not indicate how many Covid-19 patients have died within the last 24 hours – it is just how many deaths have been reported and registered with the authorities.

It also only considers patients who ever tested positive for the virus, as opposed to deaths suspected of having the coronavirus.

The method was scrutinized because someone who had Covid-19 once and then recovered was counted even if they were hit by a bus or had a car accident months later.

Department of Health (28-day period): 41,381

If someone died 28 days after testing positive for Covid-19, they would not be classified as a coronavirus death after taking this action. This means that many victims who have recovered and died from unrelated reasons are not included.

Public Health England (60 day period): 45,119

This method counts one Covid-19 death as anyone who died with a positive result within 60 days. It is published once a week.

It leaves room for those who may have died several weeks after being infected, considering that some patients may be in the hospital long before they eventually die from the disease.

However, this also means that some people who tested positive for the virus recovered and died a while later from various reasons will be caught.

According to Public Health England, the 60-day cut-off is better than 28 days as some patients have long-term Covid-19 symptoms after the appearance of recovery and cannot be removed from the list if not immediately after their diagnosis to die .

National statistical authorities: 57.007

Data compiled by home country statistics shows that 56,846 people across the UK had died from confirmed or suspected Covid-19 by the end of May.

The National Statistics Office confirmed yesterday that as of August 7, 51,935 people in England and Wales with confirmed or suspected Covid-19 had died.

According to the Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency (NISRA), the number of coronavirus deaths in Northern Ireland was 854 on the same day.National Records Scotland – which collects statistics north of the border – said 4,213 people had died nationwide as of June 22.

Their numbers are always 10 days behind the Department of Health (DH) as they wait until as many deaths as possible have been counted for each date to avoid revising their statistics.

Excessive deaths: 65,278

Excessive deaths are considered a more accurate measure of the number of people killed by the pandemic because it encompasses a wider range of victims.

The data relates not only to people who may have died with Covid-19 without ever being tested, but also how many more people died because, for example, their medical treatment was postponed or when they did not come to the hospital or could you were seriously ill.

Data from England and Wales show an additional 59,324 deaths between March 15 and June 12, 4,953 between March 2 and June 22 in Scotland and 1,001 between March 28 and June 26 in Northern Ireland.

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