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Coronavirus UK: 135,000 face job losses in "economic Armageddon"


The extent of the carnage for Covid-19 jobs was revealed when a mail audit found that 135,000 jobs in the UK were facing the ax.

Analysis of the risk of layoffs since the virus got in has found 230,000 jobs to be created in more than 100 of the UK's largest companies, both domestically and abroad.

The layoffs continued on Wednesday when WH Smith announced it would lay off 1,500 employees, mostly at train stations and airports, as commuters and vacationers had declined.

The extent of the carnage for Covid-19 jobs was revealed when a mail audit found that 135,000 jobs in the UK were facing the ax

WH Smith CEO Carl Cowling said: "I regret that this will affect a significant number of colleagues. We will do all we can to support them during this challenging time."

WH Smith CEO Carl Cowling said: "I regret that this will affect a significant number of colleagues. We will do all we can to support them during this challenging time."

Clothing chain M & Co will close 47 stores and shed 380 jobs after going bankrupt in April, while bookmaker William Hill said 119 of its betting shops are closing due to a shortage of customers.

Last night it was also found that around 1,500 employees in LGH-managed hotels in England and Scotland could lose their jobs. Hotels include Crowne Plaza, Holiday Inn, and Hallmark.

This is followed by announcements from Pizza Express, Currys PC World, Hays Travel and DW Sports that will cut up to 4,470 jobs.

The scale of job losses will increase pressure on the government to get Britain back to work and tighten the message to employers and workers.

Just over a third (34 percent) of UK employees are back at their desks, with the remainder continuing to work from home.

This is in contrast to 83 percent of French office workers and 70 percent of Germans, according to a survey by researchers at the investment bank Morgan Stanley.

However, their analysis found that Brits who have returned to their offices do so more days a week than their continental rivals.

Analysis of the risk of layoffs since the virus got in has found 230,000 jobs to be created in more than 100 of the UK's largest companies, both domestically and abroad

Analysis of the risk of layoffs since the virus got in has found 230,000 jobs to be created in more than 100 of the UK's largest companies, both domestically and abroad

Almost half (46 percent) of UK return workers work from their office at least five days a week, far more than in France, Germany, Italy or Spain.

Hundreds of thousands of civil servants are still working two weeks after Boris Johnson urged workers to return to the office to help save the economy.

Whitehall ministries are said to be "ghost towns" with only 2 percent of employees coming to work this week, according to a review by the Daily Mail.

Only a few dozen employees entered the offices of the Ministry of Education and the Ministry of Labor and Pensions every day. The once busy offices can employ a total of 3,500 people.

The majority of the government's 430,000 Whitehall employees still work from home. Although the departments can accommodate 30 percent of the staff, the cabinet office admitted that only one in five officials is in the offices.

MPs called on staff last week to point the way for the rest of the UK after an email investigation found ministerial offices were like "ghost towns" and only a fraction of the staff showed up.

Treasury Department staff, who must book a spot 48 hours in advance if they want to enter, have reportedly been assured that they will be given two months' notice before going back to work. Only the Ministry of Labor and Pensions, which can accommodate around 1,700 workers, saw a slight increase in the number of employees – from 31 last Thursday to 33 yesterday.

It comes after health officials in the cabinet and home office investigated a coronavirus outbreak last week.

According to reports, workers are being privately reassured by some department heads that they can continue working from home this month and only have to enter if they want to.

There are growing fears that city center shops and restaurants that rely on the habit of office workers will be ruined if more employees are not encouraged to return. Last week, civil servant Alex Chisholm said it was time to "change the default that civil servants work from home and accelerate return to work from August".

Dave Penman, general secretary of the FDA union who represents civil servants, said the government should not use civil servants to give a "sign of virtue" to the private sector.

A government spokesman said, "We are working closely with staff to end the failure that officials should work from home and have made sure workplaces are Covid-safe so officials can return safely."

Many job cuts have been attributed in part to the gradual withdrawal of the vacation program. And MPs warned against further downsizing at smaller companies and called for more to be done.

The cost of vacationing millions of British workers rose by more than £ 2 billion in the last week of July, new figures show.

As of August 2, around 9.6 million jobs were covered by the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme (JRS), government figures show. That was an increase of 100,000 from the previous week.

The cumulative cost of the program rose from £ 31.7 billion on July 26 to £ 33.8 billion on Sunday, an increase of £ 2.1 billion.

However, HM Revenue and Customs said they currently have no data on how many jobs are currently occupied.

This makes it difficult to determine how many people have returned to work as a result of Boris Johnson's call for offices and other workplaces to be reopened to stimulate the economy.

Iain Duncan Smith said, “It is outrageous that people are still being told not to go back to work. If they don't go back to work, Britain will be hit by economic Armageddon, and with it unemployment, which means more lives are lost. & # 39;

The analysis found that major companies that have released figures are shedding 22,500 jobs in retail, 18,100 in restaurants and 21,600 in travel and airlines.

Carl Cowling, CEO of WH Smith, said, "I regret that this will affect a significant number of colleagues. We will do everything we can to support them at this challenging time."

Since the March 23 lockdown, the following companies have announced significant job cuts …

August 5

LGH (hotel group – 1,500 at risk

WH Smith – 1,500

M & Co – 380

4th of August

Dixon's Carphone – 800

Pizza Express – at risk 1.10

3rd August

Hays Travel – up to 878

DW Sports – 1,700 at risk

July 31

Byron – 651

30th July

Pendragon – 1,800

July 28th

Selfridges – 450

July 27th

Oak furniture land – endangered 163

July 23

Dyson – 600 plus 300 abroad

22nd of July

Mears – less than 200

Fortnum & Mason – 50

20th of July

Marks & Spencer – Endangered 950

17th July

Azzurri Group – up to 1,200

16th of July

Genting – Endangered 1,642

Burberry – 150 plus 350 abroad

15th of July

Banks Mining – Endangered 250

Buzz Bingo – Endangered 57

July 14th

Vertu – 345

DFS – endangered 200

July 9

General Electric – 369

Boots – 4,000

John Lewis – at risk 1,300

Burger King – at risk 1,600

7th of July

Polypipe – 250

Reach (newspaper group) – 550

July 6th

Pret a Manger – 1,000 at risk

2nd July

Luton Airport – 250

Casual Dining Group – 1,909

July 1

SSP (owns Upper Crust) – Endangered 5,000

Arcadia (owns TopShop) – 500

Harrods – 700

Virgin money – 300

Accenture – 900

Norwich Theater Royal – 113

Willmott Dixon – 100

June 30th

Airbus – 1,700

TM Lewin – 600

Wright & # 39; s Pies – 80

Harveys – 240

25th June

Royal Mail-2,000

June 24th

Jet2 – 102

Swissport – 4,556

Nicholson Coat of Arms – 130

June 19th

Aer Lingus – 500

15th June

Jaguar Land Rover – 1,100

Travis Perkins – 2,500

June 12

Le Pain Quotidien – 200

June 11th

Heathrow – 25,000

Bombardier – 600 plus 1,900 abroad

Johnson Matthey – 2,500

Centrica – 5,000

Grant Thornton – 70

June 10th

Quiz – 93

Restaurant group – 3,000

Monsoon Accessorise -545

Everest Windows – 188

8th June

BP – 10,000 worldwide

Mulberry – 375

June 5th

Victoria's secret – 800 at risk

Bentley – 1,000

June 4th

Aston Martin – 500

Lookers – 1,500

June 1

Triumph – 240 plus 160 abroad

May 29th

Belfast International Airport – 45

28th of May

EasyJet – 1,900 plus 2,600 abroad

May 26

McLaren – 1,200

May 22

Shearings Holidays – 2,500

Carluccios – 1,000

May 21

Clarks – 900

May 20th

Rolls-Royce – 6,000 plus 3,000 abroad

May 19

Ovo Energy – 2,600

Antlers – 164

May 15

JCB – Endangered 950

The economist – 90 worldwide

May 13th

Tui – 270 plus 7,730 abroad

12th of May

Carnival Great Britain – 450

May 11th

P&O Ferries – 1,100 worldwide

5th of May

Virgin Atlantic – 3,150

1st of May

Ryanair – 3,000 worldwide

April, 30th

Oasis Warehouse – 1,800

April 29th

Deliveroo – 350 worldwide

April 28th

British Airways – 12,000

April 23

Saffron seats – 400

Meggitt – 1,800 worldwide

April 21

Cath Kidston – 900

17th April

Debenhams – 422

March 31

Laura Ashley – 268

March 30

BrightHouse – at risk of 2,400 March 27th

Chiquito – Endangered 1,500

John Menzies – 17,500 worldwide

More British workers are staying at home than in other large European countries – but those who have returned do so longer

David Wilcock, Whitehall correspondent for MailOnline

Fewer UK office workers have returned to work today than any other major European country, according to new figures.

Just over a third (34 percent) of UK employees are back at their desks, with the remainder continuing to work from home.

This is in contrast to 83 percent of French office workers and 70 percent of Germans, according to a survey by researchers at the investment bank Morgan Stanley.

However, their analysis found that Brits who have returned to their offices do so more days a week than their continental rivals.

Almost half (46 percent) of UK return workers work from their office at least five days a week, far more than in France, Germany, Italy or Spain.

The numbers come from a bloodbath on Main Street that left retailers massively less foothold.

WH Smith and M & Co cut hundreds of jobs today, meaning the number of workers laid off as a result of the Covid crisis is now over 100,000.

One in 20 shielding Britons does not plan to return to work anytime soon

Around one in 20 people in England who have been screened for coronavirus have no plans to return to work in the next few months.

About 6 percent of people classified as clinically extremely vulnerable who had normally worked before receiving protection recommendations said they do not intend to return to work in the near future.

Another 21 percent said they would like to continue working from home, while 35 percent said they would return to their previous job.

The figures come from the Office for National Statistics (ONS) and are based on a survey carried out between July 9th and 16th.

A total of 2.2 million people in England were classified as extremely clinically vulnerable (CEV) to the effects of Covid-19 by the government earlier this year and were advised to protect themselves from others.

This council was officially suspended from August 1st.

Tim Gibbs, of the ONS public services analysis team, said, "Before he was advised to shield, nearly a third of CEV employees were working.

"Most plan to return to work or continue working from home in the next four months, but about one in twenty CEV employees plan not to return to work.

"Of those who said they would go back to work outside of the home, 68 percent said they felt comfortable when they or their employer took protective measures."

The figures also show that 60 percent of respondents said they fully followed the protection guidelines – that's an estimated 1.3 million people.

Around 65 percent said they had not received any visitors, except for personal support.

On July 6, the government indicated that CEV people could create a support bubble with another household and be outdoors for sports and other reasons.

The ONS survey shows that of those who had received a visitor without personal attention in the past seven days, 36 percent had only visitors from their support bubble, while 35 percent chose not to bubble at all.

WH Smith announced 1,500 layoffs this morning after customers went to stores during the coronavirus pandemic, saying it needs to cut costs as stores at airports and train stations are hit by low passenger numbers and stores on the main drag also suffer from low numbers step.

Just over half of the UK's travel businesses have reopened and 246 of the largest websites have been reopened.

All 575 high street stores have opened, the company said, but visitor numbers have declined sharply year over year.

Revenue was 57 percent lower last month compared to July 2019, despite websites welcoming customers back, with most of that loss being due to the travel arm.

M & Co announced it will close 47 fashion stores and cut 380 employees, while gambling giant William Hill announces that 119 of its betting shops across the UK will be permanently closed amid fears that store customer numbers will not match pre-pandemic levels will return.

Boris Johnson last month updated the official guidelines for people who want to work from home whenever possible to breathe new life into the economy.

However, he later had to lean back on a liberalization of the lockdown regime for fear of a second coronavirus wave in the coming weeks.

Monday was supposed to be the day many Britons returned to their jobs, but many offices, factories and other workplaces have remained closed.

The cost of vacationing millions of British workers rose by more than £ 2 billion in the last week of July.

As of August 2, around 9.6 million jobs were covered by the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme (JRS), government figures show. That was an increase of 100,000 from the previous week.

The cumulative cost of the program rose from £ 31.7 billion on July 26 to £ 33.8 billion on Sunday, an increase of £ 2.1 billion.

Last week, the Bureau of National Statistics (ONS) said nearly a fifth of workers – an estimated six million people – have stayed on vacation despite the government's attempts to bring the economy back to life.

Pizza Express was among the big names who announced cuts yesterday when chefs announced they could close 67 of their UK restaurants with up to 1,100 jobs at risk.

The 55-year-old company, owned by Chinese private equity firm Hony Capital, has £ 735 million in debt and has put itself up for sale after consulting experts.

The chain's bosses said they wanted to cut rents by closing about 15 percent of the UK's 449 restaurants, which would help protect 9,000 jobs.

The news came when Curry's PC World owner Dixons Carphone also announced today that it is cutting 800 jobs as part of a revision of its business administration structure.

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