TOP TRENDING

Coronavirus UK: 11 new deaths in the death toll


The UK corona virus outbreak could worsen as alarming government figures today show that the average number of new cases has increased six percent in the first week since early May – but the daily death toll has dropped to a 17-week low.

Ministry of Health data shows that 530 more Britons tested positive for the life-threatening illness, meaning the moving average of daily infections rose to 624 for the third day in a row – from 590 last Monday, which was 34 percent less than on the same day the week before.

The last time the UK saw an increase in its average number of daily cases was on May 7th, when 5,600 British people were diagnosed with Covid-19 and the increase was due to more people being dabbed for the infection after officials said Mass had finally increased. Test scheme.

It takes little more than a week for the UK to take the first steps back to normal life after Number 10 finally eased the stringent blackout rules to boost the economy. Millions flocked to pubs to celebrate “Super Saturday,” despite warnings from top scientists that in some cases this would lead to a further increase.

In other promising signs, only 11 more deaths from Covid-19 were announced in the lowest daily death toll in 17 weeks. It may take three weeks for the patient to succumb to the disease, which means that an actual increase in cases may not become apparent until after a fortnight.

Department of Health chiefs say the final death toll, which includes laboratory-confirmed deaths across facilities across the UK, is now at 44,830. However, a few gruesome numbers that take into account suspected deaths show that the UK passed the 50,000 mark in early June.

Government data shows that 21 deaths were recorded yesterday and 16 deaths last Monday. However, the numbers released on Sundays and Mondays are getting lower due to a delay in weekend recording. Eighty-three Britons now die on average every day from Covid-19 – a drop of 12 percent from the average of 95 last Monday.

In other UK corona virus developments today:

  • Face masks could become mandatory in stores "in the next few days" as Boris Johnson promised clarity after ministers caused confusion by contradicting politics.
  • More than 100 outbreaks of corona viruses in schools, businesses and pubs are treated "quickly and tacitly" every week in the UK, Health Minister Matt Hancock said.
  • The urge to take workers back from the coronavirus block to the office encountered a roadblock after some of the country's largest companies said only 40 percent would return from home.
  • Councils in England are preparing to cut jobs and services significantly after losing income from investments in airports, cinemas and offices as a result of the coronavirus pandemic.
  • The British pharmaceutical company AstraZeneca is preparing to start human trials with an antibody treatment that could protect old and vulnerable people from coronaviruses.
  • Beauty salons, nail poles and tattoo shops in England were opened for the first time in four months as part of the recent easing of the restriction.
  • Immunity to Covid-19 could be lost in months, according to studies suggesting that the virus could infect humans annually. like the flu.

Another 21 people have died from coronavirus within 24 hours, increasing the death toll in the UK to 44,819

BORIS PROMISES CLARITY ON FACE MASKS "IN THE NEXT DAYS"

Boris Johnson was wearing his face mask again today when he visited the London emergency services headquarters

Boris Johnson was wearing his face mask again today when he visited the London emergency services headquarters

Boris Johnson vowed clarity on face masks "for the next few days" when the government's approach fell to pieces.

The prime minister, who was wearing a blanket in London this morning, insisted that they were “of great value” in the tightest of spaces, as in shops.

He said ministers and officials "reviewed" the guidelines as to whether they should be mandatory in such situations and suggested that an announcement be imminent.

The comments came on charges that the government was "everywhere" on face masks and that Prime Minister Gove was apparently at odds over asking for them in stores. They are currently only required by law for public transport in England.

Scientists have warned that the public will be "confused" after the cabinet minister insisted that indoor blankets should be "polite".

Mr Johnson said on Friday that the government "must insist that people wear facewear in confined spaces."

Meanwhile, Attorney General Robert Buckland added to the sense of confusion by saying "maybe" internal masks should become mandatory, arguing that this was more than "politeness" and "security".

Nicola Sturgeon has already introduced the rule for Scotland, while London Mayor Sadiq Khan has called for the change.

Ministry of Health numbers released yesterday showed that 207,000 tests had been performed or released the previous day. The number includes front-end antibody testing for NHS and caregivers.

However, the bosses again refused to say how many people were tested, which means that the exact number of Britons dabbed because of the SARS CoV-2 virus has been a mystery for a month – since May 22 .

Health chiefs also reported over 650 other cases of Covid-19. Government statistics show that the official size of the UK outbreak is now 289,603 cases.

The actual size of the outbreak that got out of control in March is estimated at millions based on antibody test data.

Daily death records don't show how many Covid 19 patients have died within the past 24 hours – it's just how many deaths have been reported and registered with the authorities.

The data do not always match the updates provided by the home countries. Department of Health officials are working on a different time limit, which means that daily updates from Scotland and Northern Ireland are always out of sync.

And the NHS England census every afternoon, which only takes hospital deaths into account, doesn't match the DH numbers because they use a different recording system.

For example, some deaths announced by NHS England chiefs have already been counted by the Department of Health, which records deaths "as soon as they are available".

More than 1,000 infected Britons died every day on the darkest days of the crisis in mid-April, but the number of victims had fallen by about 20 to 30 percent from week to week since the beginning of May.

NHS England today had 11 deaths in hospitals across the country. A Covid 19 death has been registered in all environments in Northern Ireland, but none has been registered in Scotland or Wales.

It comes after the Secretary of Health said today that over 100 coronavirus outbreaks are "quickly and tacitly" treated across the UK every week.

Matt Hancock revealed how flare-ups in schools, businesses, and pubs across the country are consistently treated with "local measures" just nine days after many businesses reopened.

He wrote in the Daily Telegraph today, adding that many of the outbreaks are nipped in the bud before they can "make the news".

He said that increased testing, some of which are door-to-door in infected areas, means that officials can be more targeted rather than taking national action.

Mr. Hancock's comments came after 73 cases of the virus had been confirmed at AS Green And Co, a farm in Mathon, Herefordshire, which resulted in around 200 workers being quarantined as a precaution.

In other developments today, Boris Johnson swore clarity about face masks in the next few days when the government's approach to coverings fell into ruins.

The prime minister, who was wearing a blanket in London this morning, insisted that they were “of great value” in the tightest of spaces, as in shops.

COVID-19 IMMUNITY CAN BE LOST WITHIN THE MONTHS

According to research, immunity to Covid-19 could be lost within months. The graph shows how antibody levels peaked five weeks after symptoms started (POS), but then faded. The color of the dots indicates the severity, with purple being the most serious symptoms

According to research, immunity to Covid-19 could be lost within months. The graph shows how antibody levels peaked five weeks after symptoms started (POS), but then faded. The color of the dots indicates the severity, with purple being the most serious symptoms

According to research, immunity to Covid-19 could be lost within months.

The results suggest that the virus, like the common cold and flu, could infect people annually.

This undermines the notion that herd immunity could be a way to defeat the virus.

Scientists from King’s College London examined the immune response of more than 90 patients and healthcare workers at Guy and St. Thomas’s NHS Foundation Trust.

They found that antibody levels peaked three weeks after symptoms and then decreased.

The main author Dr. Katie Doores told the Guardian: "People react reasonably to the virus, but it will go away for a short period of time and depending on how high your peak is, it depends on how long the antibodies stay."

He claimed that ministers and officials would "review" the guidelines as to whether they should be mandatory in such situations and suggested that an announcement be imminent.

The comments came on charges that the government was "everywhere" on face masks and the prime minister apparently disagreed with Michael Gove for asking in shops.

Scientists have warned that the public will be "confused" after the cabinet minister insisted that indoor blankets should be "polite".

Mr Johnson said on Friday that the government "must insist that people wear facewear in confined spaces."

Meanwhile, Attorney General Robert Buckland added to the sense of confusion by saying "maybe" internal masks should become mandatory, arguing that this was more than "politeness" and "security".

Today, more questions came up about the coronavirus immunity puzzle. Studies have shown that the antibody levels peak three weeks after symptoms and then fade.

The results, uncovered by a team at King’s College London, suggest that the coronavirus could infect people like the flu annually.

This undermines the idea that herd immunity could be a way to defeat the virus, that protection against a vaccine may not last very long and that the vaccine may need to be reformulated every year.

The researchers examined the immune response of more than 90 patients and healthcare workers at the Guy and St. Thomas NHS Foundation.

However, there is still a possibility that the body will fight the virus a second time with T cells, even if the antibody levels drop.

Another study found that more than half of coronavirus patients in the hospital who were given cardiac scans worldwide had abnormalities.

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), more than 230,000 Covid-19 cases were registered on Sunday in the darkest 24 hours of the Sunday pandemic.

The record number of new infections means that since the pandemic started in December, 12.5 million people worldwide have been hit worldwide.

Statistics show that outbreaks are increasing in the United States, Brazil, India and South Africa. While the European nations seem to have emerged from the worst of the crisis.

The corona virus, which first appeared in China, has killed more than half a million people, but the number of infected patients who die every day has hardly changed.

WHO chiefs have warned that the peak of the Covid 19 pandemic is yet to come as the spread of the virus accelerates in some parts of the world.

According to Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Director General of the UN agency, the number of cases worldwide has doubled in the past six weeks.

Dr. Tedros warned last week that the coronavirus pandemic was still not at its peak and admitted that the situation was "worsening".

How many people in the UK really died from the corona virus?

Ministry of Health: 44,819

The latest death toll from the Department of Health for all appointments (as of July 8, 9:00 a.m.) is 44,819.

Daily data doesn't indicate how many Covid-19 patients have died within the past 24 hours – it's just how many deaths have been reported and registered with the authorities.

Only patients who tested positive for the virus are considered, as opposed to deaths suspected of being coronavirus.

National statistical offices: 55.216

Data compiled by home country statistics shows that by the end of May, 55,216 people across the UK had died from confirmed or suspected Covid-19.

The National Statistics Office confirmed yesterday that as of June 19, 50,219 people in England and Wales died with confirmed or suspected Covid-19.

According to the Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency (NISRA), the number of coronavirus deaths in Northern Ireland was 824 on the same day.

National Records Scotland – which collects statistics north of the border – said 4,173 people had died nationwide by June 22.

Their numbers are always 10 days behind the Ministry of Health (DH) as they wait until as many deaths as possible have been counted for each date to avoid revising their statistics.

Excessive deaths: 65,249

The total number of surplus deaths has now exceeded 65,000.

Excessive deaths are an accurate measure of the number of people killed by the pandemic because they span a wider range of victims.

The data refer not only to people who may have died with Covid-19 without having been tested, but also how many more have died because of, for example, postponing their medical treatment or when they did not come to the hospital or could you have been seriously ill.

Data from England and Wales show that an additional 59,324 deaths were recorded between March 15 and June 12, 4,924 in Scotland between March 10 and June 22 and 1,001 between March 28 and June 26 in Northern Ireland.

(tagsToTranslate) Dailymail (t) News (t) NHS (t) Coronavirus