TOP TRENDING

Coronavirus UK: 10 new deaths in the daily preliminary death toll


The UK recorded an additional 10 coronavirus deaths in the preliminary count today, with all deaths occurring in England.

Health authorities have yet to confirm the final day number, which takes into account data from all facilities across the UK. The early census for England includes only laboratory-confirmed victims in NHS-run hospitals.

The virus claimed an additional 17 deaths yesterday, up from 34 on Saturday, although deaths are typically lower on Sundays and Mondays due to delayed detection in hospitals.

Today's jump means the UK coronavirus death toll is 41,998. This is the worst in Europe. Only the United States, Brazil, India and Mexico, all countries with much larger populations, have more victims.

As of Sunday, the average number of daily deaths over seven days was 30, although that is likely to decrease when the Department of Health releases today's true number later this afternoon.

Daily deaths hit a 10-week high last Thursday – when there were 40 deaths for the first time since July 14 – confirming experts' fears that the recent surge in infections could ultimately become fatal.

More than 6,000 people become infected with the disease every day, doubling the amount in early September and tripling the amount in August. Until recently, hospital stays and deaths had remained low and stable, but now admissions are doubling every eight days and deaths are rising too.

NUMBER 10 & # 39; S 10PM CURFEW IS referred to as "SICK EXPERIMENTAL" by TORY MPS

Boris Johnson's 10 p.m. coronavirus curfew was classified by his own MPs as a "sick experiment for a second wave" – ​​when the mayor of one of the UK's largest cities warned that it would "do more harm than good".

Greater Manchester Mayor Andy Burnham said the government drinking period is pushing crowds into supermarkets to buy alcohol to drink by the roadside or in private homes.

It came when dozens of drinkers were spotted on Saturday night in trendy Moseley, Birmingham, turning to a marching band despite restrictions imposing social distancing.

The prime minister's curfew, which he announced last week, has largely been postponed due to these foreseeable consequences.

A Tory MP wrote to Politico, “What clown-faced idiot thought it would be a good idea to throw thousands of p ***** people out of pubs onto the street and into the subway at the same time?

"It's like a sick experiment to see if you can incubate a second wave."

In other twists and turns of today's coronavirus crisis:

  • Boris Johnson faces a growing Tory rebellion over action and evasion of parliamentary control – although spokesman Lindsay Hoyle is expected to save him from a humiliating Commons defeat to coronavirus powers by refusing to vote on a rebel change .
  • No10 has tried to cool the argument over students being forced to self-isolate and insisted that they "expect" to be allowed to return home for Christmas.
  • Former Minister Simon Clarke has signed a letter with fellow Teesside MPs warning that a ban on household mixing would "condemn thousands of locals to loneliness and isolation".
  • Tory MP Steve Baker compared Mr. Johnson to Lord of the Rings character Theoden, who was put into a trance by evil advisors who wreaked havoc on the kingdom.
  • Downing Street has insisted that it is too early to assess whether the rule of six is ​​working, despite a two-week timeframe for evaluation when it was introduced on Sept. 14.
  • Chris Hopson, head of the NHS operator, warned the government must run a million tests a day until winter and that the contact tracing system is now as important as catching criminals or putting out fires.

It comes after official data showed restaurants and pubs were responsible for less than three percent of all recorded respiratory disease outbreaks in the week Boris Johnson announced the hospitality curfew at 10 p.m.

Between September 14 and 20, only 22 outbreaks of acute respiratory infections were reported in grocery stores in England. 17 of these were due to Covid-19 while the others may have been due to flu or other viral illnesses.

Public Health England data provides an overview of where viruses are spread across the country.

In a weekly update on outbreaks in different settings, PHE reports situations where two or more people have been diagnosed with the same breast infection and the cases that have been reported to local authority public health teams. Outbreaks can vary in size and no data is published on how many people are involved in each.

Public Health England showed that the majority of Covid-19 outbreaks were in schools and nursing homes for the week leading up to September 20. Only three percent were reported from pubs and restaurants

Public Health England showed that the majority of Covid-19 outbreaks were in schools and nursing homes for the week leading up to September 20. Only three percent were reported from pubs and restaurants

Bolton is still the UK's Covid-19 hotspot after more than 200 cases per 100,000 last week. In other areas of the UK affected by local lockdowns, infections continued to rise despite stricter measures being imposed

Bolton is still the UK's Covid-19 hotspot after more than 200 cases per 100,000 last week. In other areas of the UK affected by local lockdowns, infections continued to rise despite stricter measures being imposed

LOCAL LOCKDOWNS DO NOT WORK, DATA SHOWS

Data shows Luton is the only area in England that has successfully managed to clear cases to the point where the draconian rules can be lifted - but the infection rate is starting to rise again

Data shows Luton is the only area in England that has successfully managed to clear cases to the point where the draconian rules can be lifted – but the infection rate is starting to rise again

Economically crippling and socially restrictive local lockdowns cannot contain coronavirus outbreaks, the analysis shows.

More than 17 million Britons in 48 cities and counties currently live with even more restricted freedoms than the rest of the country.

Many have been banned from meeting friends or family indoors, and students in the locked areas are virtually confined to their dormitories.

The residents of these places have been told that the rules are essential for suppressing the virus. However, data shows that Luton is the only area in England that has successfully managed to clear cases to the point where the draconian rules can be lifted.

However, there are fears that the city of Bedfordshire could face renewed restrictions after cases rose by a third from 26 per 100,000 to 35.5 per 100,000 last week.

Stockport and Wigan also managed to break free from the shackles of local lockdowns, but measures were reinstated on Friday after infections recovered. The other 46 regions that are on lockdown are all seeing spikes in infections, according to the latest government data.

Bolton is still the UK's Covid-19 hotspot after more than 200 cases per 100,000 last week. Cases have more than tripled in the past three weeks, despite the city of Greater Manchester being locked in place earlier this month.

The data is worrying as it implies that the nationwide measures announced last week – including the "rule of six" and the 10pm curfew – do little to stop the spread of the coronavirus at the cost of restricting freedoms the people and the damage to the economy.

Outbreaks from restaurants and grocery stores lagged well behind schools and colleges, which accounted for 44 percent of the outbreaks in England – 341 total. Nursing homes recorded 25 percent of weekly outbreaks, a total of 195, followed by offices and factories saw 16 percent – a total of 124 .

Of all 772 cough outbreaks recorded across the country for the week ending September 20, 532 were directly linked to the coronavirus.

The numbers stem from growing concerns that pubs and restaurants closing at 10 p.m. could lead to a surge in infections. Over the weekend, drunk travelers were pushed onto public transport when getting off – they would likely have been spread out over longer periods of time before the curfew.

In Piccadilly Circus, Leeds, Liverpool and Manchester in London, drinkers were celebrated in the streets after being evicted from venues that pulled down the shutters.

Manchester Mayor Andy Burnham has warned that the draconian restriction "does more harm than good" for the government, forcing crowds into supermarkets to buy alcohol to drink on the side of the road or in their homes.

And landlords have also warned the measures could mean a “death sentence” on barely “on the water” companies after losing months of trade during the UK's blanket lockdown.

Acute outbreaks of respiratory infections – when two or more people have the same coughing fit – were eight times more common in the second week of September than in the first in England's schools (23-193).

Not all outbreaks will be Covid-19 – they are chest infections in general – but some are.

The high levels of outbreaks in schools may be due to a resurgence of the rhinovirus, which causes runny noses, according to data from Public Health England.

The graph shows a significant increase in this virus as children mingle in schools after months at home.

The dates are likely to put more pressure on the government to end the 10pm curfew, which has been accused of being "dangerous" and "creating an incentive for people to gather on the streets".

Former Labor leadership contender, Mr Burnham, said: “I received reports that supermarkets were full to the rafters and crowds of people gathered after 10pm.

“I think there is an urgent need to review emerging evidence from police forces across the country. My gut feeling is that this curfew does more harm than good.

“It may be contradicting itself because it creates an incentive for people to gather in the street, or rather at home. This is the opposite of what our local restrictions are trying to do.

"I don't think this has been properly thought through, to be honest, and of course it harms bars and restaurants too."

His words were repeated by Liverpool Mayor Joe Anderson. The city has had its average number of daily cases nearly tripled in two weeks, putting it on the government's lockdown watchlist.

Taking the government's blanket approach, he said, "No off-licenses and supermarkets are allowed to be open to sell beer until midnight, and pubs can empty at 10 p.m. when people go off-licenses, beer buy or drink on the street in large groups or go into houses and drink in large groups. It will only spread the virus.

“The current situation makes things more dangerous, not better.

"I think it's silly to close restaurants at 10pm," he said, adding that midnight is "more responsible" and that pub closings should be staggered.

An angry Conservative MP also expressed concern about the measures, telling Politico, “What clown-faced idiot thought it was a good idea to throw thousands of people out of pubs onto the street and onto the subway at the same time?

"It's like some kind of sick experiment to see if you can incubate a second wave."

Pictures showed thousands of night owls crowding England's streets and public transport this weekend after the 10 p.m. curfew came.

Data from NHS Test and Trace shows that between September 21-27, the most common place of transmission was reported as being at home or visiting another household.

The data also showed that coronavirus sufferers were most likely to say they would eat out or shop before symptoms appeared, followed by a vacation, or alone or with family.

Scientists are spread out over the 10pm deadline, which "does not appear to be based on evidence" but suggests that a compromise has been struck between economic damage and a desire to contain the spread of viruses.

(tagsToTranslate) Dailymail (t) News (t) NHS (t) Scotland News (t) Coronavirus (t) Wales