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Coronavirus results in the UK were not good, Sir Patrick Vallance admits


The government's best scientific advisor hit Boris Johnson today in the hope of persuading workers to return to their offices, saying that there was "absolutely no reason" to change the current work of the home management.

Sir Patrick Vallance said Britain is "at a time when distancing is important" and remote working "remains a perfectly good option".

He went even further when he said that many companies had found that working from home was not "detrimental to productivity" and that there was therefore no need to deviate from politics.

The Prime Minister is expected to use a press conference on Downing Street tomorrow night to urge more people to physically return to work and use public transport to do so.

The government is increasingly concerned about the impact that continuing work from home could have on the country's economic recovery as many cities and towns remain abandoned.

But Sir Patrick's comments will increase the pressure on the Prime Minister to explain exactly why he believes it is safe and necessary for people to return to normal life.

Meanwhile, Sir Patrick also delivered bomb interventions at the time the UK was blocked and the government's overall performance during the pandemic.

England's chief scientific adviser said lockdown measures should have been implemented a week earlier, while the outcome of the pandemic "was not good for Britain".

He also told MPs on the Science and Technology Committee that researchers have been in favor of wearing face masks since April, since he appears to have made his point clear by wearing a cover for the meeting before removing it.

Sir Patrick Vallance set an example by arriving at today's Science and Technology Committee with a face mask and then declaring that it was safe for him to remove, since everyone was at least two meters away from him

Boris Johnson will use a press conference tomorrow afternoon to set new guidelines for working from home and returning to the office

Boris Johnson will use a press conference tomorrow afternoon to set new guidelines for working from home and returning to the office

The number of employees has decreased by 650,000 since the outbreak of the coronavirus chaos

The number of employees declined by a further 74,000 last month, with 2.6 million benefits rendered. This was announced today.

According to official figures, between May and June, after a further reduction of 0.3 percent between May and June, around 650,000 fewer are on the payroll than before the crisis.

The vacancies are at a record low and working hours have also dropped, according to data from the Office for National Statistics. The number of applicants has increased by 112.2 percent or 1.4 million since March.

However, the massive vacation and self-employment programs seem to hide the scale of the problems.

Rishi Sunak said the government's response was "to protect millions of people from unemployment."

A separate survey by the UK Chamber of Commerce found that a third of companies plan to fire employees over the next three months.

Sir Patrick's appearance on the selection board was as follows:

  • The UK announced another 66 coronavirus deaths, meaning the average daily death rate has dropped to its lowest since March.
  • Scotland had one death today and ended its seven-day stay without victims.
  • The official death toll in Covid-19 in the UK yesterday passed the grim milestone of 45,000 and is now at 45,119.
  • King & # 39; s College London's COVID Symptom Tracker app estimates that 2,100 people in the community contract the virus daily, up from 1,400 in the past week.
  • The number of UK workers on the corporate payroll decreased 649,000 during the freeze, as the pandemic claimed another 74,000 jobs last month, the new National Statistics Office said.
  • ONS data also showed that annual growth of regular weekly wages in the public sector was 4.8 percent in May, while it was minus 2.6 percent in the private sector

Sir Patrick used his appearance in front of the committee this afternoon to conduct a series of interventions that are likely to increase tensions between the government and its top advisor.

However, the timing of his comments on work from home is likely to lead to controversy at number 10 as the prime minister is generally expected to turn the current guidelines upside down in a briefing tomorrow.

Below is a breakdown of Sir Patrick's key points.

To work from home

The chair of the Science and Technology Committee, Greg Clark, asked Sir Patrick directly if he believed that people should no longer work from home unless they are vulnerable or are living with vulnerable people.

Sir Patrick replied, "My view of this and I think this is a view that SAGE shares is that we are still at a time when distance measures are important and the various distance measures that many companies have at home work out, are still perfectly good option because it is easy to do.

"I think a number of companies believe that this does not affect productivity, and in this situation I see absolutely no reason to change it."

Number 10 is believed to be increasingly concerned about the economic impact of continuing to work from home.

Bank of England governor Andrew Bailey told Tory MPs last night that a "Fear" of commuting means "stopping the recovery" and that shops, restaurants and cafes need returning customers.

It is expected that Mr. Johnson will tell people tomorrow that it is now safe for more workers to return to their offices. He is also likely to drop the current guidance that suggests that people should only use public transportation as a last resort.

The economic impact of working from home was addressed by Mr. Clark with Sir Patrick.

The expert said it was not up to the Scientific Advisory Group on Emergency (SAGE) to weigh the economics of the coronavirus crisis and that a further reopening of the UK economy would ultimately be a decision for ministers.

However, he warned that the spread of the corona virus "depends on contacts. The more contacts you have up close, the more likely they are to spread."

He said: “We have not been specifically asked to address this issue, but it is clearly part of the assessment, and this is where the integration of business, economy and science comes together. I was certainly involved in these discussions.

“This is exactly what happens in the cabinet, in the Ministry of Finance, and these things flow into the decision-making process.

& # 39; SAGE can not advise. The principles are fairly simple in a way. The likelihood that the virus will spread depends on the contacts. The more contacts you have up close, the more likely they are to spread, and this principle underpins a lot of advice.

"But then, for all the reasons we've talked about, including the economic and health implications, the decision must clearly be included in the final policy decisions."

Total hours worked in the UK hit a record low from March to May, according to the latest data from the National Statistics Office

Total hours worked in the UK hit a record low from March to May, according to the latest data from the National Statistics Office

The Office for Budget Responsibility Watchdog's downward scenario released yesterday predicts that unemployment will rise to more than four million next year - at a higher rate than in the 1980s

The Office for Budget Responsibility Watchdog's downward scenario released yesterday predicts that unemployment will rise to more than four million next year – at a higher rate than in the 1980s

How many people in the UK really died from the corona virus?

Ministry of Health: 45,119

The latest death toll from the Department of Health for all appointments (as of 3:00 p.m., July 15) is 45,119.

Daily data doesn't indicate how many Covid-19 patients have died within the past 24 hours – it's just how many deaths have been reported and registered with the authorities.

Only patients who tested positive for the virus are considered, as opposed to deaths suspected of being coronavirus.

National statistical offices: 55.216

Data compiled by home country statistics shows that by the end of May, 55,216 people across the UK had died from confirmed or suspected Covid-19.

The National Statistics Office confirmed yesterday that as of June 19, 50,219 people in England and Wales died with confirmed or suspected Covid-19.

According to the Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency (NISRA), the number of coronavirus deaths in Northern Ireland was 824 on the same day.

National Records Scotland – which collects statistics north of the border – said 4,173 people had died nationwide by June 22.

Their numbers are always 10 days behind the Ministry of Health (DH) as they wait until as many deaths as possible have been counted for each date to avoid revising their statistics.

Excessive deaths: 65,249

The total number of surplus deaths has now exceeded 65,000.

Excessive deaths are an accurate measure of the number of people killed by the pandemic because they span a wider range of victims.

The data refer not only to people who may have died with Covid-19 without having been tested, but also how many more have died because of, for example, postponing their medical treatment or when they did not come to the hospital or could you have been seriously ill.

Data from England and Wales show that an additional 59,324 deaths were recorded between March 15 and June 12, 4,924 in Scotland between March 10 and June 22 and 1,001 between March 28 and June 26 in Northern Ireland.

The government's general coronavirus response

Sir Patrick said in March that it would be a "good result" to keep the number of coronavirus deaths in the UK below 20,000.

With more than 45,000 deaths, Sir Patrick said it was "absolutely clear" that the pandemic outcome in the UK was "not good".

The government has long insisted that all decisions it made during the crisis are based on the latest scientific and health recommendations available.

Sir Patrick told the committee that there will be "many factors" that will determine how well countries responded to the outbreak.

He said: “As Chris Whitty (Chief Medical Officer Professor) said earlier, it is very difficult to know where we are at the moment.

“It is clear that the result in the UK was not good. I think you can be absolutely clear about that.

“It is clear that you can see a group of countries that do less well in the temperate zone. Countries that are very well networked internationally, countries with population structures of a certain type.

"There are many factors that will play a role when we look and say," What makes some countries worse than others? "And decisions are made that will not turn out to be right at the time. & # 39;

The timing of the lockdown in Britain

Mr Johnson put the United Kingdom in a locked state on March 23.

But Sir Patrick suggested today that the draconian restrictions should be imposed a week earlier.

The expert said a number of steps had been taken in the run-up to the ban, beginning with self-isolation for people returning to the UK from China.

He continued: “When the SAGE Modeling Subgroup, SPI-M, found that the doubling time had dropped to three days – mid-March – the advice given by SAGE was the rest of the measures should be implemented as soon as possible .

“And I think this advice was given on March 18 or 16. But then that data became available.

"Looking back, you can see that the data may have preceded it, but the data was previously unavailable – the knowledge of the three-day doubling rate became apparent the week before."

UK vaccine hopes

Sir Patrick said it could not be expected that there would be a coronavirus vaccine in the near future as he dashed growing hopes that people could soon be stabbed to remove the risk of infection.

He told the committee that Britain has a "wide range" of vaccination options "because we don't know which one will win," but he added, "We assume that we will not have it and if we get it, we will do it. " be thrilled. & # 39;

When asked about trials with human challenges in which people are deliberately exposed to the virus after vaccination, he said the method is an "established method" for testing vaccines.

Sir Patrick said, "What are the two major challenges for this virus? Dose and rescue. So the prerequisite for running Human Challenge studies is understanding what dose is causing a safe infection, and can you save it if you do something wrong? & # 39;

To the current answer to these questions, he said: “We do not know the dose and do not yet know when remdesivir (medication) will save the infection.

Mr. Johnson is expected to inform people that they can now safely return to public transportation. Some train operators, such as the Southern Railway, have already started changing their messages

Mr. Johnson is expected to inform people that they can now safely return to public transportation. Some train operators, such as the Southern Railway, have already started changing their messages

Traffic data from TomTom show that congestion in London is roughly the same as last week and is 10 percent below average overall

Traffic data from TomTom show that congestion in London is roughly the same as last week and is 10 percent below average overall

The numbers show a dramatic decrease in traffic in the capital when the closure was announced in March, with the numbers increasing steadily in June and July

The numbers show a dramatic decrease in traffic in the capital when the closure was announced in March, with the numbers increasing steadily in June and July

“It is absolutely right to explore, but we are not there yet to have all the answers. We have to make sure that we get on safely. & # 39;

He added: “It is important to recognize that the chances of getting a fully sterilized vaccine, i.e. H. In my opinion, someone who protects you 100 percent from it is minor.

“It is much more likely that you have a vaccine that reduces the severity of the disease and reduces the spread a little. I think that's the most likely result with vaccines. & # 39;

Test regret

Sir Patrick said it would have been "absolutely preferable" to have a much larger testing capacity earlier in the pandemic.

He also told the committee that a lesson from the pandemic is the "importance" of data flow.

He said: “It would have been absolutely preferable to have a much larger testing capacity early on.

“But it's not just about tests, it's about basic information flows about patients in hospitals, about admission rates, about movement rates. These types of things are also important parts of it. & # 39;

Face mask guide

Sir Patrick gave a public example by coming to the committee meeting with a mask when he said he did not know how busy the meeting room would be. He then took it off as soon as he was satisfied that everyone was at least two meters away from him.

People in the UK will have to wear face masks in all stores from July 24, the government said this week after not being recommended for months.

Politicians have now admitted that they can help stop the virus from spreading and, according to Sir Patrick, obtained what the SAGE advisers said in April.

He said the advice given by SAGE (the Emergency Scientific Advisory Group) in April was "essentially" ahead of the World Health Organization's advice and was the information that influenced the latest government policies.

He said to MPs today: “When you go back, our face mask advice was in April.

"And we said that face masks are of little positive value when used in confined spaces where overcrowding can occur and you cannot keep a distance of two meters. This is essentially the advice given by the World Health Organization ) has worked out and is essentially. " the Council, which is now the basis of the policy …

“We (the WHO) were quite ahead of this particular advice. I think there is a risk of confusing corporate accountability with scientific advice. & # 39;

At the meeting, he repeatedly stated that he and SAGE are not empowered to make or influence decisions, but only to advise politicians and ministers.

The chief scientific advisor added: “It is true that in April and during the closure, the value of face masks was rather low because most people don't go out.

“So it makes sense to think about timing. The timing now when we release measures is a reasonable time to think about what other mitigating factors you would like to introduce.

"For example, it would have made no difference to make the workplace completely Covid-safe in the middle of the block since no one was going to work."

Why Boris’s return to work is doomed to failure: half a million people commute to the City of London every day, but now the Square Mile is a ghost town with top companies that plan to get only 20% of their workers back to the office

About 518,000 people would commute to the Square Mile on a normal day before the coronavirus devastated the British economy – and possibly changed the nation's work habits for good.

The streets of the City of London are still empty a week after Boris Johnson asked workers to return to their offices. Ten of the top companies on the Square Mile state that they will only bring back 20 percent or less of their employees.

But even if the rules for social distancing were relaxed, many doubt that the London commuter army would ever return.

While millions of workers have gotten used to working from home, and surveys show they don't feel like going back to the commuter rat race as we knew before, their bosses are in no hurry to do it.

Many companies have been amazed at how well work has been done from home and have found that they can save millions of pounds by making it an integral part of their business, especially if it can cost up to £ 60,000 a year to have only one job in London.

Unfortunately, this promises to be a catastrophe for commercial landlords, the staff who secure, clean, and maintain the buildings, as well as the businesses in cities that rely on office workers who eat, drink, and go to and from work and during lunch shopping hours

The lack of commuters is also a catastrophe for Transport for London, which operates the tube and bus system in the city, and would see a steep drop in revenue if it continues.

Sadiq Khan already had to secure one Boris Johnson's £ 1.6 billion TfL bailout for TfL after the Coronavirus lock cut revenues by 90% and the London Mayor said it was on the verge of bankruptcy.

Tariffs will rise as early as next year, and fewer workers could mean more price increases or congestion fee increases to make up for the deficit.

Chris Biggs, founder and CEO of Theta Financial Reporting, said work from home has now been left out of the bottle – and cannot be reset.

He told MailOnline: "I think it's a turning point. From an employee's perspective, they may not feel safe when they return to the office.

“I spoke to people from large companies who don't want to go back. I know there are companies that have said they won't be back until 2021, and I know some that will now work permanently from home.

“I don't think home management systems would work as well as they do. Now they know it's possible. I know myself when I was commuting before, it's crowded and crowded – who will want to do that without a vaccine? & # 39;

Leave: The Square Mile is empty on a weekday afternoon, and office workers stay away from their desks

Leave: The Square Mile is empty on a weekday afternoon, and office workers stay away from their desks

Road to nowhere: The streets of the city of London are still free of commuters and vehicles as travel costs have dropped by almost 60 percent

Road to nowhere: The streets of the city of London are still free of commuters and vehicles as travel costs have dropped by almost 60 percent

Leadenhall Market was full of visitors during the week before the corona virus, but is now completely empty

Leadenhall Market was full of visitors during the week before the corona virus, but is now completely empty

The normally crowded parking lot at Winchester station at Winchester station was empty and showed how few workers entered

How many employees bring top city companies back to work?

Goldman Sachs: 900 out of 5,000 – 18%

RBS / Natwest: 350 from 3,500 – 10%

Amazon: 500 out of 5,000

Baker McKenzie 13 out of 1,000 1.3%

JP Morgan – 15%

Deloitte – 20%

Standard Chartered – 10%

KPMG – 5%

Deutsche Bank – 10%

London Stock Exchange – handful of employees

Richard Lim, managing director of Retail Economics, said the executives would consider whether the alleged productivity boost outweighed the savings many made during the pandemic.

Mr. Lim explained the mindset of such companies as follows: “We probably don't need as much space as we do. Out of necessity, we managed to focus our work on something that is much more digital and given the fact that rents are actually so expensive when we have people who come an average of two and a half days a week and people who are two and a half days a week Working week from home, we don't need any space and that will create significant savings for many companies. & # 39;

An employee of a company in central London with over 200 employees told MailOnline: "The main concern is that we don't have to be back. So why hurry?"

Retail stores in the city report that their visitor numbers have dropped by up to 95 percent and construction workers with protective helmets are still at least 20 to one more than men in suits.

A MailOnline survey found that a law firm, which typically employs 1,000 people, only has 13 people and is expected to increase to 250 by September, while top law firms such as Goldman Sachs, Standard Chartered and Deloitte do not exceed 20 Percent of their workforce will reach.

The numbers illustrate the extent of the challenge Boris Johnson faces when he wants city workers to return in the city center and pump money into the UK retail and services sector.

They face an implosion when workers stay at home and don't spend money in shops, cafes, and restaurants – while finance and other businesses face a less serious threat from continuing to work at home.

A separate survey by the British Chambers of Commerce (BCC) of 7,400 companies today found that almost three out of ten companies expect to cut staff before the holiday program ends in October. A similar proportion (28 percent) has fired staff since the beginning of the block.

The city's power plant companies say they want to return to their Square Mile headquarters to be more productive, but don't have enough space to accommodate their employees while maintaining social distance.

The lack of city workers can be clearly seen in the commuter belt town of Winchester in Hampshire, where only 64 people could be accommodated in the 647-car park, usually full of vehicles.

After talking to companies and experts on the Square Mile, MailOnline can reveal the following:

  • Standard Chartered, the Royal Bank of Scotland and Amazon have only returned up to ten percent of the workforce
  • The large accounting firm KPMG only returned 5% of its employees, while Deloitte returned 20%.
  • Goldman Sachs has brought 15 percent of its employees back to London, compared to 35 percent in Europe
  • Amazon employees can stay home until October, while a law firm hopes to get 25 percent back in September
  • Smaller businesses that offer services and goods to office workers say they have lost over 80 percent of their trade
  • The London Stock Exchange is still largely empty and the majority of the usual staff still work from home
  • Thousands of City of London bankers are still not in their posh offices with streets and blocks deserted
  • Commuter trends show that travel in the city is almost 60 percent below the level before Covid-19
  • Restaurants – including the names of famous chefs – are among the restaurants that are still closed

Companies across the country are limited due to lack of space and can only bring a fraction of their workforce back to the office if they want to maintain social distance between workers.

The consequence of this is that cafes, pubs and shops that rely on office staff fear they will be pushed out of business.

Even the world-famous London Stock Exchange is abandoned, and only a "minority" of employees can come back.

Companies say they want to follow the government’s instructions to reopen, but protect their employees and adhere to the coronavirus social distance rules.

Everyone wants to go back to the office, almost every company works better when the employees are physically together – especially when it comes to finance. But the truth is that the rules for socially distancing corona viruses are impossible to achieve.

A Square Mile employee who could not be identified for fear of impact said to MailOnline: “Everyone wants to go back to the office, almost every company works better when the employees are physically together – especially when it comes to finance

"But the truth is that coronavirus social distance rules mean it's impossible to achieve."

"Either the scientific or government guidelines have to change, or the situation simply remains the same."

The city is the UK's main financial sector, delivering almost 10 percent of total UK GDP and 11.5 percent of total tax revenue.

But commuter trends show that there is still 56 percent less in the capital, which shows how many people are still at home.

In the Regis snack bar, directly opposite the steel Lloyds Building, business had almost stopped.

Server Malak Ben said: “At least 80 percent of the people who come to the store work at Lloyds.

“The people who came in told us that they would only really open in September and that they would not be fully with the employees until the new year.

"We would serve 150 people a day and now it's around 15-20."

Before the corona virus, five of us worked in the shop and now there are two. We would serve 150 people a day and now it's around 15 to 20. It's not a good situation. & # 39;

Alex Wilkins and Lee Bainbridge rushed through the market to meet customers.

They work for an office management company that is responsible for 70 buildings in the city, and admitted that most were now empty or partially used. "Ich würde sagen, dass weniger als ein Viertel der Mitarbeiter wieder arbeiten", sagte Wilkins.

Diejenigen Arbeiter, die zu ihren Schreibtischen zurückgekehrt sind, sagen, dass sie durch einen Plastikschirm getrennt sind und immer soziale Distanz bewahren müssen.

"Es ist wirklich ziemlich deprimierend und nicht so angenehm", sagte ein Mann, der nur als James bezeichnet wurde und für einen Versicherungsmakler arbeitet.

„In meiner Abteilung sollten 11 Leute sein, aber wir sind nur zu zweit. Uns wurde gesagt, dass es keine Eile gibt, Leute wieder hereinzuholen, da die Arbeit zu Hause ausgeführt werden kann.

"Ich komme gerne ins Büro, um Freunde zu treffen und Kontakte zu knüpfen, aber es ist ein langweiliger Job geworden."

Die Banken leerer Büros, die rund um die Square Mile widerhallen, geben eine mögliche Erklärung für den plötzlichen Abfall.

Die Basis des Plumtree Court von Goldman Sach hat normalerweise rund 5.000 Mitarbeiter in seinen Büros, aber nur 900 sind in – nur 20 Prozent der Kapazität.

Ähnlich verhält es sich in der Basinghall Avenue-Zentrale von Standard Chartered, in der nur zehn Prozent der Mitarbeiter beschäftigt sind.

David Solomon, CEO von Goldman Sachs, sagte gestern Abend zu den Mitarbeitern: „Wir machen auch Fortschritte in Europa, wo auf dem Kontinent 35 Prozent zurückkehrten. und in Großbritannien, wo ungefähr 15 Prozent unserer Mitarbeiter wieder im Amt sind.

'Wir treffen viele neue Vorkehrungen, um die Sicherheit zu gewährleisten, auch durch Masken und soziale Distanzierung, und es ist sicherlich nicht das übliche Geschäft, aber wir machen greifbare Fortschritte.

Malik Ben von der Regis Snack Bar sagte, der Handel sei um 80 Prozent zurückgegangen, weil Büroangestellte nicht an Schreibtischen waren, um das Mittagessen zu kaufen

Die Geschäftsfrau Zdenka Trutzova sagte, ihr Square Mile-Salon stehe kurz vor dem Bankrott

Malik Ben von der Regis Snack Bar sagte, der Handel sei um 80 Prozent gesunken, und die Salonbesitzerin Zdenka Trutzova sagte, sie stehe vor dem Bankrott

Vom Straßenrand aus waren deutlich leere Schreibtische im Amazonas-Hauptquartier zu sehen, da sich rund 500 im Inneren des Gebäudes befanden

Vom Straßenrand aus waren deutlich leere Schreibtische im Amazonas-Hauptquartier zu sehen, da sich rund 500 im Inneren des Gebäudes befanden

Die Arbeitsbereiche im Büro wurden von Mitarbeitern verlassen, denen mitgeteilt wurde, dass sie zu Hause bleiben können, um ihre Arbeit zu erledigen

Die Arbeitsbereiche im Büro wurden von Mitarbeitern verlassen, denen mitgeteilt wurde, dass sie zu Hause bleiben können, um ihre Arbeit zu erledigen

Eine Handvoll Fußgänger - die meisten von ihnen Bauarbeiter - gingen um die Square Mile in der Stadt herum

Eine Handvoll Fußgänger – die meisten von ihnen Bauarbeiter – gingen um die Square Mile in der Stadt herum

"Während wir diese Schritte unternehmen, werden wir weiterhin die Gesundheit und Sicherheit unserer Mitarbeiter als oberste Priorität betrachten."

Das Hill House-Gebäude von Deloitte – eines von sechs Gebäuden, die am 6. Juli wiedereröffnet wurden – ist ebenfalls zu nur 20 Prozent ausgelastet.

Ein Sprecher der Wirtschaftsprüfungsgesellschaft erklärte: „Die Gesundheit und Sicherheit unserer Mitarbeiter und Kunden hat während der anhaltenden COVID-19-Pandemie und bei der Entwicklung unserer Strategie zur Rückkehr zum Arbeitsplatz weiterhin Priorität.

„Deloitte ist seit langem ein Befürworter des agilen Arbeitens. Seit Mitte März arbeiten 20.000 Menschen sicher von zu Hause aus.

'Wir haben eine kleine Anzahl von Büros in ganz Großbritannien eröffnet. Diese Büros wurden zur Verfügung gestellt, um die Gesundheit und das Wohlbefinden unserer Mitarbeiter zu verbessern, wenn die Umstände bedeuten, dass sie nicht von zu Hause aus arbeiten können. Alle unsere offenen Büros entsprechen den Richtlinien der Regierung und den Maßnahmen zur sozialen Distanzierung, um unseren Mitarbeitern ein sicheres Arbeitsumfeld zu bieten. & # 39;

Die Deutsche Bank sagt, dass weniger als zehn Prozent wieder eingeladen werden, aber ihre Zeit zwischen dort und zu Hause aufteilen könnten.

In der Bishopsgate-Basis von Natwest und RBS mit 3.500 Schreibtischen sind weniger als zehn Prozent der Mitarbeiter beschäftigt.

Selbst der Online-Riese Amazon – ein Unternehmen, das während der Pandemie hohe Umsätze erzielt hat – beschäftigt weniger als zehn Prozent seiner Mitarbeiter in seinem Principal Place-Gebäude an der Grenze zur Stadt.

Beim Online-Riesen Amazon werden alle Mitarbeiter, die von zu Hause aus arbeiten können, dies bis zum 2. Oktober tun, bis die Situation überprüft wird.

Eine Handvoll Mitarbeiter betraten und verließen das Hauptquartier des Unternehmens zur Mittagszeit, waren jedoch in der Lobby von Sicherheitspersonal zahlenmäßig unterlegen.

Reihe um Reihe waren leere Schreibtische in dem Gebäude mit Glasfront am Rande der Stadt in Spittalfields zu sehen.

Ein anderes Unternehmen gab an, in seinem Büro nur zu fünf Prozent tätig zu sein, um sicherzustellen, dass seine Mitarbeiter vor Coronaviren geschützt sind.

Das Unternehmen, das 70 Gebäude verwaltet, gibt an, dass die meisten leer stehen oder teilweise genutzt werden

Einige Unternehmen konnten ihre Büros kaum eröffnen.

Lawyers Baker Mackenzie, who can fit 1,000 people into their premises, are currently looking to gradually reopen in September.

Joanna Ludlam, partner in the Dispute Resolution team, told the MailOnline: 'Since lockdown we have maintained a skeleton staff in the building.

It's a core team of 13 who come in three days a week to maintain postal, admin and collection requirements.

'To make the building safe for our staff, initially we will only have capacity for around 25 per cent of our people at any one time, so it won't be a return to pre-COVID times just yet.'

Celebrity chef Gino D'Acampo's pasta restaurant was among businesses still closed along with The Tortilla Grill, Brokes Wine bar and The Lamb Tavern.

'I like coming to the office, to meet friends and socialise but it has become a boring job.

A sign in the window of clothing store Oliver Sweeney said they were now permanently shut.

In the deserted Leadenhall market hairdresser Zdenka Trutzova said her salon was on the brink of bankruptcy.

She said she is lucky to see one customer a day at her salon called Daniels.

Amazon's office on the border of the City of London stood nearly empty with staff at home until at least October

Amazon's office on the border of the City of London stood nearly empty with staff at home until at least October

Mobility data shows how many people are missing from the City of London even though lockdown has been eased

Mobility data shows how many people are missing from the City of London even though lockdown has been eased

Official figures showed GDP grew by 1.8 per cent in May, although it is still nearly a quarter lower than before the draconian coronavirus restrictions were imposed. In this chart 100 represents the size of the economy in 2016

'Before all the offices closed I would have between 15-20 customers a day.

'It is a disaster and unless the office workers come back soon I will have to close.

'The rents in the market are so high and I will struggle to pay them. I think Leadenhall Market will be finished.

'It is so sad. I have worked for 10 years to build up the business.'

At a Holland and Barrett health food store they would 300 people a day but now just 60 people pop in.

The scale of the drop off in foot traffic for cafes and restaurants was made clear by staff at a nearby Joe The Juice café.

One staff member said before the Covid-19 crisis they would serve 300 people an hour during the lunch period.

Since offices closed they now see less than 30 people a day.

'It is awful, but we have continued to work and rely a lot on deliveries to offices. We talk to customers and they say they will not be coming back until at least September or even later.'

Tailor Tim Howard was one of the few men in a shirt and tie and was tie hurrying to an appointment with a client.

His company Tom James Tailoring makes bespoke suits and he has been keeping appointments with those who have returned to work.

'Obviously it is still very quiet, but I have an appointment today with a client,' he said.

'The people I talk to want to come back to work, but that is up to their bosses.

'Hopefully people will start to come back in the next couple of weeks.'

According to many small business owners around The City, less than ten per cent of office workers have returned.

Commuter city's car park is down over 70 per cent in lockdown as business workers stay away

In Winchester, a commuter belt hub where standard class railway season tickets cost up to £6,372 a year, the station was all but deserted last night.

The 647-space railway car parks, which are full to bursting in normal times as affluent commuters drive in from the picturesque villages nearby, held only about 100 cars.

An annual parking permit costs up to £552. From the start of the lockdown in mid-March, South Western Railway received 36,269 refund requests for season tickets, causing the company losses of hundreds of thousands of pounds as veteran commuters opted to work from home.

Winchester railway station car park was practically empty on a weekday evening, when it would usually be packed

Winchester railway station car park was practically empty on a weekday evening, when it would usually be packed

Matthew Hill, 52, a management consultant at Winchester railway station

Ian Dickson, 37, at Winchester railway station

Matthew Hill, 52, and Ian Dickson, 37, were two of the rare commuters using the train station, which serves the City

But the trains are still running, and some workers who have to attend their offices are making use of the services.

'I've been commuting for the last two months and the trains are still empty,' said Ian Dickson, 37, an air traffic controller at Farnborough Airport.

'It is busier than it was, but there's still only two or three people on the carriage with me, so it's easy to observe social distance.

'I go up to Manchester on the weekends to see my family, and those routes are a lot busier. It's really the commuting that has stopped.

'From Monday to Friday, it feels like you're on a ghost train and the stations are deserted, too. Most of the little shops for buying newspapers and things are shuttered.

'On the whole, life feels like it's getting back to normal, but that's not the case on the trains. It's as if commuting is behind the curve compared to the rest of the economy.'

A longtime fan of the Brompton folding bike immortalised by the hit BBC comedy W1A, Mr Dickson said that he was no longer having to use the collapsible function as the trains were so empty.

'There's acres of space,' he said. 'I just wheel my bike on and lean it against the seats. No problem. But it does feel like there's no point in having it. I could just use a normal bike.

'It's been nice in a way,' he added. 'It's quite relaxing to sit and read your book first thing in the morning, with nobody to disturb you. No snoring or arguing, and nobody crammed in around you.'

How many jobs are at risk across the UK?

  • Accenture – 900
  • Airbus – 1,700
  • Arcadia – 500
  • BA – 12,000
  • Beales – 1,052
  • Bentley – 1,000
  • Burger King – 1,600
  • Casual Dining Group (Bella Italia, Cafe Rouge and Las Iguanas) – 1,900
  • DHL at Jaguar Land Rover – 2,200
  • EasyJet – 4,500
  • Go Outdoors – 2,400
  • Harrods – 700
  • Harveys – 240
  • Links – 350
  • Mothercare – 2,500
  • Oasis Warehouse – 1,800
  • P&O Ferries – 1,100
  • Pret a Manger – 1,330
  • Ryanair – 3,000
  • SSP Group (Upper Crust, Caffe Ritazza) – 5,000
  • Ted Baker – 160
  • TM Lewin – 600
  • Tui – 8,000
  • Victoria's Secret – 800 at risk

Matthew Hill, 52, a management consultant who used to commute to London four days a week but who has been working from home since the beginning of lockdown, agreed – though he said that commuting had become 'a bit creepy'.

'It's a bit boring, to be honest,' he said. 'I just fall asleep. There's nobody to talk to or look at. Sometimes you look around and wonder if you've slipped into a Stephen King story.'

Yesterday was the first time that Mr Hill had braved the trains for work in four months. 'It was not as I'd expected,' he said.

'During lockdown, it's like being stuck in a bubble. It's been really hard to relate to the deaths and carnage that have been taking place elsewhere in the country, and difficult to really feel the economic shock in the service industry, for example.

'I thought that getting back on the trains would bring me more in touch with frontline workers and people who have been suffering this thing in different ways. But there's just nobody about.'

He added: 'At the same time, it does bring it home on another level. The damage this is doing to the companies that rely on commuters, from train firms to shops, is tremendous.

'Nobody really wants to go back to the crowded stations we used to have for quite some time.'

Employment figures nationwide also paint an alarming picture of work in Britain post-coronavirus lockdown.

Figures released today show the number of people with jobs fell by another 74,000 last month with 2.6million on benefits.

Some 650,000 fewer are on the payroll than before the crisis, according to official figures.

Vacancies are at a record low and hours have also tumbled, the Office for National Statistics data show. The claimant count has risen by 112.2 per cent, or 1.4million, since March.

Some 650,000 fewer are on the payroll than before the crisis, according to official figures

Some 650,000 fewer are on the payroll than before the crisis, according to official figures

A separate survey by the British Chambers of Commerce has also found that a third of firms are planning to lay off staff over the next three months.

Pay has also been hit hard, dropping 0.3 per cent in the three months to May compared to the same period last year. Accounting for inflation, that is equivalent to a 1.3 per cent reduction.

Jonathan Athow, deputy national statistician at the Office for National Statistics (ONS), said: 'As the pandemic took hold, the labour market weakened markedly, but that rate of decline slowed into June, though this is before recent reports of job losses.

'There are now almost two-thirds of a million fewer employees on the payroll than before the lockdown, according to the latest tax data.

'The Labour Force Survey is showing only a small fall in employment, but shows a large number of people who report working no hours and getting no pay.'

He added: 'There are now far more out-of-work people who are not looking for a job than before the pandemic.'

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